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Listings

: A Ballad Concert

Kathleen Hay (mezzo-soprano)
Alexander Fortune (tenor) Gladys White (pianoforte)

Contributors

Mezzo-Soprano: Kathleen Hay
Mezzo-Soprano: Alexander Fortune
Pianoforte: Gladys White

: HAYDN HEARD and his BAND

Relayed from
The West End Cinema, Birmingham

: ARTHUR SALISBURY and his ORCHESTRA

Relayed from The Savoy Hotel

: RED MARLEY

Op''" tt"J Climb for Motor Cycles
(Under me auspices of the Birmingham Motor
Cycle Club)
A Running Commentary by Major
Vernon Brook
Relayed from Red Marley Hill , Great
Whitley , Worcs.
The famous Red Marley Hill is 550 yards long with gradients as follows :
First 150 yards, i in 10 Second 100 yards, i in 5 and i in I Finishing the last 150 yards, i in 3 The Record Climb is held by Mr. L. Heath in 26 4/5 seconds

Contributors

Unknown: Vernon Brook
Unknown: Marley Hill
Unknown: Whitley Worcs.
Unknown: Marley Hill
Unknown: Mr. L. Heath

: 'The First News'

Weather Forecast, First General News Bulletin and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Leslie Bridgewater Quintet

VERA SIDDONS (soprano),
GLADYS PALMER (contralto)
BARRINGTON HOOPER (baritone)
GEORGE PIZZEY (bass) and at 6.50
'Highways and Byways '
Popular Songs arranged for four- voices and quintet, by Herman Lohr and Leslie Bridgewater

Contributors

Soprano: Vera Siddons
Contralto: Gladys Palmer
Baritone: Barrington Hooper
Bass: George Pizzey

: THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND

Conductor,
B. WALTON O'DONNELL

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell

: Act 2 of Johann Strauss's Opera 'Die Fledermaus '

(First Performance, April 5, 1874)
The artists taking part include :
ELISABETH SCHUMANN
VERA SCHWARZ.
ALFRED PICCAVER
VIENNA STATE OPERA CHORUS
VIENNA PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Conducted by OSWALD KABASTA
Relayed from the studio of the Austrian
Broadcasting Company
THIS PERFORMANCE of Die Fledermaus from Vienna is within a day or two of the sixtieth anniversary of the first performance of the operetta in that city. It was produced on April 5, 1874, at the famous Theater an der Wien, where Strauss was to score triumph after triumph for the next twenty years. Already as popular a musician as any that Vienna had yet produced, by reason of his waltzes and dance music, Strauss became in the end practically a national figure, and Viennese music is associated more with his name than with even Mozart's or Beethoven's.
It is not too high praise to say that
Die Fledermaus is the perfect operetta. It is certainly the most famous and the most popular. Even Strauss himself never wrote anything finer ; it sparkles with the gayest music imaginable, and the plot is, of its kind, first rate. It has been performed many thousands of times in Vienna alone, and its total performances all over the world must constitute a record. The plot is a complicated one of masks, disguises, flirtations and the usual amusing intrigues belonging to farce. The second act is a ball given by Prince Orlofsky. Everybody in the cast is there, mostly disguised with masks, and the assumption is that the disguise is effective and the ensuing complica- tions natural. The music, however, is so extraordinarily effervescent that for the purpose of this broadcast the plot matters scarcely at all.

Contributors

Unknown: Elisabeth Schumann
Unknown: Vera Schwarz.
Unknown: Alfred Piccaver
Conducted By: Oswald Kabasta

: THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Directed by HENRY HALL

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall

: 'The Second News'

Weather Forecast, Second General News Bulletin

: DANCE MUSIC

LEW STONE and his BAND

Contributors

Unknown: Lew Stone








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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