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Listings

: THE RUTLAND SQUARE AND NEW VICTORIA ORCHESTRA

Directed by Norman Austin
From The New Victoria Cinema, Edinburgh (Scottish Regional Programme)

Contributors

Directed By: Norman Austin

: Philharmonic Midday Concert

(Under the direction of Johan Hock)
From Queen's College, Birmingham)
THE GRILLER QUARTET:
Sydney Griller (1st Violin) ; Jack O'Brien (2nd Violin); Philip Burton (Viola); Colin Hampson
( Violoncello)
Assisted by JOHAN HOCK (Violoncello)

Contributors

Violin: Jack O'Brien
Violin: Philip Burton
Viola: Colin Hampson
Assisted By: Johan Hock

: LADDIE CLARKE'S IMPERIAL HYDRO HOTEL ORCHESTRA

From The Imperial Hydro Hotel, Blackpool

: THE HOTEL METROPOLE ORCHESTRA

(Leader, A. Rossi )
Directed by Emilio Colombo
From The Hotel Metropole, London

Contributors

Leader: A. Rossi
Directed By: Emilio Colombo

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
Bulletin and Bulletin for Farmers, followed by Regional Announcements

: REGINALD FOORT

At The Organ of The Regal, Kingston-on-Thames

: Reginald King and his Orchestra

OLIVE GROVES (Soprano)

Contributors

Soprano: Olive Groves

: The Royal Philharmonic Society Concert

Relayed from The Queen's Hall
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
Albert Sammons (Violin)
Lionel Tertis (Viola)
The London Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor, Sir Thomas Beecham
At the moment Rossini's music appears to be under a cloud, but the time is not far off when it will again come into its own. The Barber of Seville and William Tell are undoubtedly Rossini's two most successful operas, the music of which has definitely lasting qualities. In the overture to William Tell there is plenty of variety in the way of sentiment and gaiety, and the orchestral treatment is brilliant to an extreme.
In the eighteenth century orchestral works which contained a prominent solo part for one or more instruments were called 'concertantes.' The concertante was therefore a kind of forerunner to the modern concerto. Mozart's very beautiful example of this form is said to have been written in 1780. It is scored for solo violin and viola and an orchestra consisting of two oboes, two horns, and strings. There is not very much independence in the solo parts: when the violin and viola unite they play for the most part in thirds and sixths.

Contributors

Violin: Albert Sammons
Viola: Lionel Tertis
Conductor: Sir Thomas Beecham

: Interval

Including the ' Song of Honour,' by Ralph Hodgson , read by FABIA DRAKE

Contributors

Unknown: Ralph Hodgson
Read By: Fabia Drake

: CONCERT

(Continued)
Towards the end of 1872 Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother that his Second Symphony was nearing completion and that he was unable to think of anything else : ' It seems to me to be my best work, at least as regards correctness of form, a quality for which I have not so far distinguished myself.' It was performed early in the following year with great success. Known as the Little Russian Symphony because the finale is based on a little Russian folk-song called The Crane, it is quite a charming work, but the music is not so original and powerful as that of the later symphonies. The last movement has always been the popular one.

: ' The Second News'

WHEATHERFORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA, directed by HENRY HALL

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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