• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: FRANK NEWMAN

At the Organ of Lozells Picture House,
Birmingham
(Midland Regional Programme)

: JACK MARTIN and his HOTEL MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA

From The Hotel Majestic, St. Annes-on-Sea
(North Regional Programme)

: A GRAMOPHONE RECITAL

Arranged and Presented by ROBERT TREDINNICK
(Midland Regional Programme)

Contributors

Presented By: Robert Tredinnick

: The Midland Studio Orchestra

Directed by Frank Cantell
(Midland Regional Programme)

Contributors

Directed By: Frank Cantell

: THE SCOTTISH STUDIO ORCHESTRA

Directed by Guy Daines
(Scottish Regional Programme)

Contributors

Directed By: Guy Daines

: REGINALD DIXON

At the Organ of The Tower Ballroom, Blackpool
(North Regional Programme)

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN and Bulletin for Farmers

: THE NORTHERN STUDIO ORCHESTRA

Directed by JOHN BRIDGE
STELLA TAGGART (Soprano)
JAMES LOUGHLIN (Pianoforte)

Contributors

Directed By: John Bridge
Soprano: Stella Taggart
Pianoforte: James Loughlin

: THE B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Directed by HENRY HALL

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall

: String Orchestral Concert

SURYA SENA (Sinhalese Folk-songs)
THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Strings of Section D)
(Led by LAURANCE TURNER )
Conducted by LESLIE HEWARD
Concerto Grosso in E minor (Op. 6, No. 3) Handel
1. Larghetto, Andante ; 2. Allegro ; 3. Polonaise : Andante ; 4. Allegro, ma non troppo
Nearly two hundred years ago-that is to say, in 1739, when this Grand Concerto, one of twelve, was composed-Handel was alive, very popular, and was still composing as hard as he could go. Besides, there was not then anything like the modern choice from which to make up programmes, and Handel's share was naturally a lion's one. There can be little doubt that these Grossi Concerti were popular with audiences of those days, as were the twelve organ concertos written about the same time, and in no place was Handel's music more welcome than in the Gardens of Vauxhall and Ranelagh. The organ concertos were certainly played there, for a new and expensive organ had recently been built in the rotunda of Vauxhall Gardens; and the Grand Concertos figure often in the programmes. Handel was, of course, a frequent visitor to the Gardens, and an honoured one. One recalls all this because, if such an imposing title as Concerto Grosso did not appal the very mixed audiences at Vauxhall, it need not appal any listener tonight. As a matter of fact, these ' Grand Concertos ' are extremely robust, jolly things, and far more free and unlicensed in form than was the kind of work which presently took its place-the symphony.
The first three of his native Sinhalese songs which Surya Sena is singing are remarkable for their great antiquity. They are sung, as all Indian melodies are sung, without harmonic accompaniment-for the Tambura, a stringed instrument which will be used as a bass, makes only a drone. The words and melodies of such songs as these are based on the gait and movements of various animals, birds, and reptiles.

Contributors

Unknown: Laurance Turner
Conducted By: Leslie Heward
Unknown: Grossi Concerti

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE'S BLUE LYRES, from THE DORCHESTER
HOTEL








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel