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Listings

: Frank Newman

At THE ORGAN of LOZELLS PICTURE HOUSE, BIRMINGHAM
(Midland Regional Programme)

: JACK MARTIN and his HOTEL MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA

From THE HOTEL MAJESTIC, ST. ANNES-
ON-SEA
(North Regional Programme)

: A RECITAL OF GRAMOPHONE RECORDS

(North Regional Programme)

: Organ Recital

by HAROLD SPICER
From THE CHURCH of THE MESSIAH,
BIRMINGHAM
(Midland Regional Programme)

Contributors

Unknown: Harold Spicer

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN and Bulletin for Farmers

: THE SCOTTISH STUDIO ORCHESTRA

Directed by GUY DAINES
JOHN MATHEWSON (Baritone)

Contributors

Directed By: Guy Daines
Baritone: John Mathewson

: Act III of Wagner's Opera 'The Mastersingers'

Performed by The Covent Garden Opera Company
Relayed from The King's Theatre, Edinburgh
Scene 1: Inside Sachs' House
Scene 2: The Festival Meadow.
Cast in order of appearance:
Chorus of Apprentices, Citizens, etc.
Conductor, John Barbirolli
It is the morning of the Festival of St. John. Sachs is seated reading. He talks a little with David, his apprentice, and falls into meditation, voicing his thoughts in the famous monologue, ‘Mad, mad, all the world's mad.' Walther, his guest, now enters and tells Sachs of a song that came to him in his dream. Sachs notes it down and comments upon it; they go out leaving the song on the table and Beckmesser enters the room. He is Walther's rival in the song contest and for the hand of Eva, and seeing the song, concludes it is by Sachs and carries it off. Sach's returning, is visited by Eva. who pretends that one of her shoes needs attention, but who really hopes to see Walther, and is rewarded by his appearance. David and Magdalena now enter, and the scene concludes with the singing of the glorious quintet, one of the most lovely passages in all opera. The next scene is the meadow prepared for the Song Contest. The Guilds, with banners flying, arrive one after another, followed by the dignified entry of the Mastersingers. After a chorus in praise of Sachs, the Contest begins. Beckmesser sings first and not understanding the song he has stolen, makes it sound ridiculous. He is derided by the people. Walther now sings the song as it should be sung and wins his right to election in the Guild and the hand of Eva. The act comes to an end with Sachs' impassioned defence of German Art and the Mastersingers, followed by a chorus of the assembled multitude singing in homage of Sachs.
(From Edinburgh)

Contributors

Conductor: John Barbirolli
Hans Sachs (Shoemaker): Horace Stevens
David (Sachs' Apprentice): Ben Williams
Walther Von Stolzing: Francis Russell
Sixtus Beckmesser (Town Clerk): William Michael
Eva (Pogner's Daughter): Thea Philips
Magdalena (Eva's Nurse): Gladys Parr
Veit Pogner (Goldsmith): Philip Bertram
Kunz Vogelgesang: Percy Harris
Konrad Nachtigall: Leslie Horsman
Fritz Kothner: Frank Sale
Balthazar Zorn: H Spencer Grundy
Augustin Moser: Liddell Peddieson
Hermann Ortol: Harry Mann
Hans Schwarz: Norman Roe
Hana Foltz: George Gorst

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

MAURICE WINNICK and his ORCHESTRA, from
THE CARLTON HOTEL

Contributors

Unknown: Maurice Winnick








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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