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Listings

: The Buxton Municipal Orchestra

Conducted by HORACE FELLOWES
Relayed from THE PAVILION GARDENS, BUXTON
(North Regional Programme)

Contributors

Conducted By: Horace Fellowes

: The Manchester Tuesday Midday Society's Concert

Relayed from THE HOULDS'
WORTH HALL, MANCHESTER
A Pianoforte Recital by CYRIL SMITH
(North Regional Programme)

Contributors

Unknown: Cyril Smith

: The Midland Studio Orchestra

Directed by Frank Cantell
(Midland Regional Programme)

Contributors

Directed By: Frank Cantell

: Moschetto and his Orchestra

From The Dorchester Hotel

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; Bulletin for Farmers.

: The Cedric Sharpe Sextet

RONALD GOURLEY (Entertainer)

Contributors

Unknown: Ronald Gourley

: Promenade Concert

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL, LONDON
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
British Concert
ENID CRUICKSHANK
ISOBEL BAILLIE
ERIC GREENE
JEAN POUGNET
AUBREY BRAIN
A SECTION OF THE B.B.C. CHORUS
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by SIR HENRY WOOD
CHORUS and Orchestra
Overture for Chorus, Organ, and Orchestra, Noël
Cyril Scott

CYRIL SCOTT 'S Christmas Overture was published only last year. It is scored for a very full orchestra with. at the end, a chorus singing a choral, 'Praise be to God in the Highest, for born is Our Saviour.' The overture is in the form of a fantasy and introduces Christmas melodies somewhat disguised in the Scott manner, of which the chief is ' Good King Wenceslas.'

DAME ETHEL SMYTH believes this unusual combination to be the only example of its kind and offers as .a probable explanation that the application of the valve mechanism which revolutionized horn playing has only in recent times been brought to a state of perfection. Brahms, for example, wrote a horn trio, and one of Richard Strauss 's early works is a-concerto for the horn.
The second of the three movements entitled ' Elegy,' employs a theme taken from a song in Dame Ethel's opera, The Wreckers. A special effect which should be noted in the third movement is a series of descending pianissimo chords mysteriously produced by the solo horn. It would at first seem impossible that chords can be played on such an instrument, but incredulous listeners need only listen to Aubrey Brain playing tonight to realize what this gifted artist, whom, by the way, Dame Ethel had in mind when writing the work, can accomplish on his instrument. The concerto was written in 1926, and had its first performance the following year.

THIS work was written twenty years ago when Delius was at the height of his powers. Delius' love of nature in all its manifestations is well known and is clearly shown in nearly all of his works, particularly in this one, of which Philip Heseltine in his book on Delius says that it ' is like the rugged outline of a great range of mountains whose heights are hidden from the eyes in cloud. The music is full of a sense of spacious solitudes and far horizons. The elation of the ascent is succeeded by a mood of ecstatic contemplation and the soul rises through the pure, still air to the very heights of rapture, losing all consciousness of itself as the mountain-tops are lost from the ken of man. among the wandering mists and the eternal snows.' It should not be regarded as a choral work with orchestral accompaniment, but as a work for orchestra with the voices treated as one of the instruments. No words are sung by the singers, who are instructed to use vowel sounds best suited to the expression of the moment.

Contributors

Unknown: Isobel Baillie
Unknown: Eric Greene
Unknown: Jean Pougnet
Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Unknown: Cyril Scott
Unknown: Cyril Scott
Unknown: Dame Ethel Smyth
Unknown: Richard Strauss
Unknown: Philip Heseltine

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE and his ORCHESTRA, from THE
MAY FAIR HOTEL








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