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Listings

: ERNEST PARSONS and his ORCHESTRA

From The PALACE, ERDINGTON, BIRMINGHAM

: REGINALD DIXON

At THE ORGAN of The TOWER BALLROOM,
BLACKPOOL

: THE MIDLAND STUDIO

ORCHESTRA
Directed by FRANK CANTELL

Contributors

Directed By: Frank Cantell

: 'The First News"

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; Bulletin for Farmers

: The Gershom Parkington Quintet

JOHN COLLINSON (Tenor)

Contributors

Tenor: John Collinson

: Promenade Concert

Relayed from The QUEEN'S HALL, LONDON
(Sole Lesses Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
Wagner
FLORENCE AUSTRAL
KEITH FALKNER
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by SIR HENRY WOOD
A Faust Overture
WAGNER designed this piece of music as the first movement of a Faust symphony, the idea of writing which is said to have come to him after hearing Beethoven's Ninth Symphony rehearsed in the Conservatoire. He was then a young man in Paris, heavy with disappointment and very near starvation, and to fit his mood he chose as his subject matter the Faust of Goethe; But nothing of his condition is reflected in the overture (the only part of the original scheme he completed). It is vigorous, illustrative music, and in no sense depicts the composer 'longing for kindly Death and hating life,' as the text on which the music is based would have us suppose.
FLORENCE AUSTRAL and Orchestra
Elizabeth's Prayer
Elizabeth's Greeting} (Tannhauser)
ORCHESTRA
Klingsor's Magic Garden and Flower-
Maidens' Scene (Parsifal)
KEITH FALKNER and Orchestra
Hans Sachs ' Monologues (The Mastersingers):
(a) Was duftet doch der Flieder (The Elder's
Scent is waxing)
(b) Wahn ! Wahn ! (Mad ! Mad !)
ORCHESTRA
Funeral March (Dusk of the Gods)
FLORENCE AUSTRAL and Orchestra
Prelude and Liebestod (Tristan and Isolda)
WAGNER composed his music dramas essentially for the stage, and it was very natural that he should have opposed the tearing of any parts of them from their context. But so much of his operas is as suitable for the concert room as are symphonies, symphonic poems, and other purely instrumental works, and so inevitable was the performance of long stretches from the operas away from the stage, that Wagner at last yielded with good grace. He ever conducted such performances himself. ThiE arrangement of the opening Prelude and the final scene from Tristan and Isolda was sanctioned, and a purely instrumental version actually made by Wagner himself. Isolda has hastened across the sea to the mortally wounded Tristan, only to witness his death in her arms. She now sings, in the Liesbestod, of her longing to follow him into the dark beyond, and surrendering herself to death sinks lifeless across his body.

Contributors

Unknown: Florence Austral
Unknown: Keith Falkner
Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Unknown: Keith Falkner
Unknown: Hans Sachs

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

BERTINI and his BAND, from THE TOWER BALLI
ROOM, BLACKPOOL
(North Regional Programme)








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