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Listings

: 'The First News' .

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report, Football Results, and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band

Conducted by FRED BERRY (North Regional Programme)

Contributors

Conducted By: Fred Berry

: Chamber Music

EDWARD ISAACS (Pianoforte)
THE ENTENTE STRING QUARTET : BERNARD ANDREWS (Violin) ; DOROTHY CHURTON (Violin); HORACE AYCKBOURN
(Viola); EDITH CHURTON(Violoncello)
JOHN DYER (2nd Viola) rpHERE is no work of Mozart's which more
emphatically dispels the mistaken idea of him as a composer of nothing but gracious and light-hearted music. Only in the last movement does this quintet sing of the joy of life ; till then, it is heavy-hearted with grief, even despairing at times. And besides being one of his most impassioned pieces, one of the profoundest, it is one of the most beautiful, in its melodies and in its masterly design. Except for the Quintet, K.406, which is an arrangement of an earlier serenade for wind instruments, Mozart had written none for this team-string quartet with an extra viola-since 1773, till his thirty-second year, 1787. It may have been the popularity which Boccherini's quintets were enjoying which turned his thoughts to five instruments, and ho certainly gave of his very best in the two lie composed that summer, in Vienna. This, the second of them, is in a key of which he was specially fond in his chamber music-G Minor. The first two movements, as well as the slow introduction to the last, have all the sadness we are wont to associate with minor keys ; even the major of the big slow movement which comes third, is deeply serious. The happy mood of the last is all the more striking by contrast.
RICH and sonorous throughout, this Quintet for strings is terse and compact as compared with some of Brahms' earlier chamber music.
The shapeliness and simplicity of the opening melody in the first movement make it one of the easiest of all Brahms' themes to follow in its subsequent appearances.
The next movement is quite unusual, combining a somewhat tragic slow section with what might have been the Scherzo. The two are interchanged in a most interesting way. The first solemn theme occurred to Brahms originally many years before as a pianoforte piece which ho called Sarabande.
In contrast to the smooth mood of much of the second movement, the third is in the highest spirits throughout; it, too, is terse and concise, like the first.

Contributors

Pianoforte: Edward Isaacs
Violin: Horace Ayckbourn
Unknown: John Dyer

: Songs from the Shows —VIII

Revue Songs with OLIVE GROVES ANONA WINN
REGINALD PURDELL
HAROLD KIMBERLEY
THE B.B.C. THEATRE ORCHESTRA and THE REVUE CHORUS
Conducted by LESLIE WOODGATE
Compere, JOHN WATT

Contributors

Unknown: Anona Winn
Unknown: Reginald Purdell
Unknown: Harold Kimberley
Conducted By: Leslie Woodgate
Unknown: John Watt

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE and his ORCHESTRA, from THE
MAY FAIR HOTEL








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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