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: THE SHEPHERD'S BUSH PAVILION ORCHESTRA

Conductor, HARRY FRYER
From THE SHEPHERD'S BUSH
PAVILION

: The Philharmonic Midday Concert

Directed by JOHAN HOCK
From QUEEN'S COLLEGE,
BIRMINGHAM
(Midland Regional Programme)
BEATRICE HEWITT and TOM
BROMLEY
Duets for Two Pianofortes

Contributors

Directed By: Johan Hock
Unknown: Beatrice Hewitt

: LADDIE CLARKE'S IMPERIAL HYDRO HOTEL ORCHESTRA

From THE IMPERIAL HYDRO
HOTEL, BLACKPOOL
(North Regional Programme)

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
Bulletin : London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Leslie Bridgewater Quintet

in TRANSCRIPTIONS OF POPULAR PIANOFORTE PIECES

: Halle Concert

From The FREE TRADE HALL, MANCHESTER
(North Regional Programme)
A Mass of Life by FREDERICK DELIUS
DOROTHY STANTON (Soprano)
ASTRA DESMOND (Contralto)
TREFOR JONES (Tenor)
ROY HENDERSON (Baritone)
THE HALLE CHORUS
THE HALLE ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir HAMILTON HARTY
Choirmaster, HAROLD DAWBER
COMPOSED in 1904 and 1905, the Mass was first performed by Sir Thomas Beecham in 1909, in London. The most important of Delius's works for solo voices, chorus and orchestra, it is to many of his admirors the greatest music ho has yet given us. The text is chosen from Nietzsche's Thus Spake Zarathustra, the philosophy of life on which Strauss' Tone-poem of that name is founded. Fragmentary as tho text may appear in the selection Delius has made from it, it has so much of unity that the mood it sets forth is the joyful acceptance of life and all that it holds : any doubt or thought of grief which falls on the spirit is banished by happiness, and the Mass rises at the end to a very ecstasy of joy. The chorus, in eight parts, with a rich accompaniment, begins with an invocation to the will, bidding it prepare for the last great triumph: that is among the most exultant of all Delius's music. The clue to the mood of the baritone solo which follows is the line ' I have canonized laughter,' and the first dance-song comes next, after a beautiful prelude. It closes in more serious mood, and the first part ends with a sense of the peace of night.
Part Two begins with a calm introduction, leading to a joyous outbreak, with chorus, and afterwards solo voices, proclaiming the glory of noontide on the heights. Then, when Zarathustra has sung to his muso, there is a second dance song, for women's voices without words. It leaves Zarathustra musing in a melancholy which makes way for a peaceful scene of great beauty. The next movement sings of the quiet sadness of evening, and the end, after midnight has sounded, reaches an exaltation of happiness, to the words, ' Joy desireth everlasting Day.'
CHORUS
0 Thou my Will
Roy HENDERSON
Now lift up your Hearts
TREFOR JONES
In Thine Eyes I gazed
Roy HENDERSON
Woe is me ! Whither is Time fled? Night reigneth
CHORUS
Arise, now arise, thou glorious Noontide

Contributors

Unknown: Frederick Delius
Soprano: Dorothy Stanton
Conducted By: Sir Hamilton Harty
Choirmaster: Harold Dawber
Unknown: Sir Thomas Beecham
Unknown: Roy Henderson
Unknown: Roy Henderson

: Interval

Including a Reading from the Studio : 'Legends of the North-The Flitting Boggart,' read by Mr. KENNETH ADAM

Contributors

Read By: Mr. Kenneth Adam

: A Mass of Life

(Continued)
CHORUS
Lyre, my Solace Stop not dancing
God's Woe is deeper
Roy HENDERSON
Come, now let us wandor

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Henderson

: A RECITAL OF GRAMOPHONE RECORDS

Arranged by CHRISTOPHER STONE

Contributors

Arranged By: Christopher Stone

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL News
Bulletin

: DANCE MUSIC

JACK PAYNE and his B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

Contributors

Unknown: Jack Payne








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