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Listings

: Experimental Television Transmission

by the Baird Process
(356.3 m. Vision; 261.3 m. Sound)

: FRANK NEWMAN

At THE ORGAN of LOZELLS PICTURE HOUSE,
BIRMINGHAM
(From Midland Region)

: THE TROCADERO ORCHESTRA

Directed by ALFRED VAN DAM
From THE TROCADERO CINEMA, ELEPHANT AND
CASTLE

Contributors

Directed By: Alfred Van

: 'The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: REGINALD DIXON

At THE ORGAN of THE TOWER BALLROOM,
BLACKPOOL
(From North Region)

: Reginald King and his Orchestra

(First Performance)
Radio Memories of 1931

: A Reading from 'Alice'

by Mr. James Agate
The day before yesterday was the centenary of the birth of Charles Dodgson, the shy and retiring Oxford mathematical don who wrote, under the name of Lewis Carroll, the 'Alice' books, 'The Hunting of the Snark' and 'Sylvie and Bruno,' while under his own name he wrote important and highly technical mathematical works. Everybody knows the story of how 'Alice in Wonderland' was first told to the original Alice of the story, Alice Liddell, the daughter of Dean Liddell, and later Mrs. Reginald Hargreaves, who sold the manuscript recently for £15,400. Besides the 'Lewis Carroll' books and his mathematical works, Dodgson published from time to time pamphlets on various subjects: descriptions of games of intellectual activity which he had invented, hints to mathematical examiners, and advice concerning letter-writing. Although the identity behind his pseudonym was an open secret, he used to disclaim any connection with 'books' not published under his real name. He died in 1898.

Contributors

Author: Lewis Carroll
Reader: James Agate

: THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND

Conductor, B. WALTON O'DONNELL
MAURICE REEVE (Pianoforte)

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell
Pianoforte: Maurice Reeve

: Music of William Young

Played by THE BARBARA PULVERMACHER QUINTET :
BARBARA PULVERMACHER (Violin); ALBERT CURRAN (Violin); MARY WHITTAKER (Viola) ; OLIVE RICHARDS (Violoncello);
DOROTHEA ASPINALL (Pianoforte)
HAVING in mind the old reproach that this country has depended so much on imported music and on foreign singers and players, it is refreshing to read of an Englishman who was so eminent in his own day as to command an important position in Europe. William Young, Englishman, as he was wont to describe himself, was Chamber Musician to one of the Austrian Princes about the middle of the seventeenth century, and his first pieces wore published in Innsbruck. They are notable in another way, too. It was an age when the viols were still the popular instruments for home and concert music ; William Young 's pieces are among the first written for violins. More than that, his were the first English sonatas, so-called, to be printed. They made their appearance in the year in which the great Italian violinist and composer, Corelli, was born, and some five years before our own Henry Purcell saw the light.

Contributors

Unknown: Barbara PulvermacHer
Violin: Barbara PulvermacHer
Violin: Albert Curran
Violin: Mary Whittaker
Viola: Olive Richards
Pianoforte: Dorothea Aspinall
Music: William Young
Unknown: Henry Purcell

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

THE SAVOY HOTEL ORPHEANS, from The SAVOY
HOTEL








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