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Listings

: The B.B.C. Theatre Orchestra

Conductor, LESLIE WOODGATE
BETSY DE LA PORTE (Contralto)
EDITH PENVILLE (Flute)

Contributors

Conductor: Leslie Woodgate

: Chamber Music

ASTRA DESMOND (Contralto)
THE CANADIAN TRIO:
ANNA NELSON (Violin), IDA NELSON (Violoncello),
SARA NELSON (Pianoforte)

Contributors

Violin: Anna Nelson
Pianoforte: Sara Nelson

: A RELIGIOUS SERVICE

From THE STUDIO
Conducted by the Very Rev.
H. R. L. SHEPPARD , C.H., D.D.
(Daventry National Programme)
Hymn (Ancient and Modern., 61)
Christians, awake, salute the happy Morn
Confession
Thanksgiving Psalm 122
Bible Reading Canticle
Prayers of Intercession
Hymn (English Hymnal, 402) Ho wlio would valiant be (Ancient and Modern, 670)
Address by the Very Rev.
H. R. L. SHEPPARD , C.H.,
D.D. Hymn , (Ancient and Modern, 308)
0 praise ye, the Lord !
Blessing

Contributors

Unknown: H. R. L. Sheppard
Unknown: H. R. L. Sheppard
Unknown: D.D. Hymn

: ' The News'

WEATHER FORECAST, GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN; Regional News

: THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND

Conductor, .
B. WALTON O'DONNELL
ARTHUR FEAR (Bass)
WEBER'S Euryanthe was completed in 1823, the first performance taking place in October of that year in Vienna. It was for long immensely popular on all the operatic stages of the world, and the Overture, at any rate, bids fair to remain a perennial favourite.
It begins with an impetuous rushing introduction, and then the winds give out the first tune. It is taken from a song in the first act, sung there by Adolar, the hero:' I trust in God and in my Euryanthe.' This is brilliantly elaborated, and then the violoncellos lead in the second tune, played by the violins. It, too, is from a'song of Adolar's, this time from the second act. Then the excited mood of the opening returns, closing with an impressive, silent pause. At this point the composer intended the curtain to rise and reveal a tableau which should serve as an unspoken prologue to the drama. There follows a slow and impressive section in strong contrast to the beginning. After this solemn section, a Fugato succeeds which is made of the first theme turned upside-down ; again we hear the brilliance of the opening, as well as the second subject, and the Overture closes in a mood of exultation.
WITH the same order of enthusiasm with which
Brahms and Dvorak collected and gave to the concert world the Hungarian and Slavonic Dances which are now so universally popular, Granados edited four volumes of national Spanish dances, arranging them in the lirst instance for pianoforte. Their strongly marked Spanish character is most clearly evident in their vigorous rhythm; that, indeed, seems to matter almost more than the tunes.
Listeners will remember that Granados, like his older compatriot Al.beniz, was a native of Catalonia, a part of Spain where national sentiment is a very sturdy growth.
WHEN Hercules, in a fit of madness, had slain his friend,
Iphitus, he was stricken by illness. The only cure, so the oracle told him, was that he must serve three years for wages, and give his earnings to Eurytus, whose oxen he was suspected of having carried off. He became the servant of Omphale, and, to please her, wore her dress and took her place at the spinning-wheel while she donned his lion's skin. As a mere youth, watching his father's oxen, he had slain a great lion with his hands, and thereafter wore its skin as a cloak, with its head and open jaws as a helmet. It is his submission to Omphale which is set forth in Saint-Saens' bright orchestral piece Omphale's Spinning- Wheel.

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell








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