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: A Concert

(From North Regional)
THE NORTHERN STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Directed by JOHN BRIDGE
A LTHOUGH not quite what the Scots describe as ' a stickit minister,' Reissiger did intend to adopt a theological career, changing his mind only when unexpected success was gained by one or two early church compositions of his own. On their production, a number of his works, including several operas, gained a wide popularity, but posterity is inclined to regard them as of no very great value. None the less, they are melodious and pleasing, as this overture ' will show. -
It begins with a slow introduction which foreshadows the principal tune of the quick section, the one which forms tho basis of the greater part of it. '
ELGAR'S Op. 27 is a suite for Choir and Orchestra, called From the Bavarian Highlands, an echo of the composer's travels in that kindly part of the world. Three numbers of the suite are for orchestra alone, and these are often played separately in the form of a suite. The first is a light-hearted dance in which the tune enters boldly at the third bar. Once or twice its course is interrupted by a still more animated movement, and there is a more suavo melody sometimes heard alone and sometimes along with the merry tune of the opening.
The second dance, called In Hammersbach, opens with three introductory bars, and then the first violins play the leading tune. Here, too, there is another, more smoothly flowing melody, heard along with the first, and a quieter section in the middle of the piece.
The third, more vigorous than the others, begins energetically with reiterated notes. When the boisterous tune appears, it is played first by wood-winds. Again, as in the other movements,
.there is a more gracious melody which interrupts the energy of the dance from time to time, but it is the strenuous spirit of the opening which chiefly prevails and which brings the movement to an end with great strength and sonority.

Contributors

Directed By: John Bridge

: Organ Recital

by G. D. CUNNINGHAM
From THE TowN HALL, BIRMINGHAM
(From Midland Regional)
WHEN the E Flat prelude and fugue appeared first, in the third part of the Klavierubung, they were quite separate pieces, the fugue coming at the end of a whole series of choral preludes. Who it was who first thought of joining them, no one knows, although for generations, players and accepted Bach authorities like Forkel and Spitta, have been agreed that there was nothing inappropriate in tho union. Mendelssohn was one of those who played the two together, choosing the prelude as one which was likely to make a special appeal to English listeners, and proving himself there, as so often, uncannily right in his judgment of our likes and dislikes. Mr. Harvey Grace, however, in his masterly book on the Organ Music of Bach, while agreeing that it would be useless to interfere' now with the tradition which has linked the two pieces, says : ' It is high time we gave up pretending to see the alliance in spirit and form between them,' to which earlier writers have pointed. The prelude and fugue together have long been popular in this country, despite the way in which the prelude can be made, by some organists, to sound decidedly dull. But when played at a reasonably brisk pace, it need lose nothing of the stately dignity of its great opening theme; and the suggestion of monotony in its frequent repetition of similar harmonies is not so evident as when the piece is taken at too solemn a speed.
The fugue is Bach at his splendid best; in every way a big and imposing work compactly built up, and welding its subjects, despite their many rhythmical changes, into a wonderful unity.

Contributors

Unknown: G. D. Cunningham

: Gramophone Records

(From North Regional)

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: Songs from the Shows-Ill

Presented by JOHN WATT with THE WIRELESS CHORUS and THE B.B.C. THEATRE ORCHESTRA
Conductor, LESLIE WOODGATE

Contributors

Presented By: John Watt
Conductor: Leslie Woodgate

: THE MONEY GAME—II

Sir NORMAN ANGELL

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Norman Angell

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

HENRY HALL'S GLENEAGLES HOTEL BAND, from
THE ADELPHI HOTEL, LIVERPOOL








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