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Listings

: 'The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: An Orchestral Concert

MARIE WILSON (Violin)
DALE SMITH (Baritone)
THE B.B.C. LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
THE Marriage of Camacho is a comic opera with a poor libretto based on an episode from Don Quixote, and was composed when Mendelssohn waa only sixteen. Even then it was not his first work by three years. Spontini, at that time music director of the Berlin Opera House, thought it juvenile stuff, and, though it was rehearsed and produced, it ran for one nigbt only. Mendelssohn himself came to regard it as a mistake in later years. ' For God's sake,' ho writes to a friend, ' do not let my old sin of Camacho's Wedding be stirred up again ! ' The overture is decidedly the best part of the opera.

Contributors

Baritone: Dale Smith
Conducted By: Joseph Lewis

: 'Carmen'

(Bizet)
From THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE, COVENT GARDEN
Act I. A Square in Seville
Conductor, FREDERICK HEY
CARMEN, in English, was first heard in London fifty-two years ago, four years after the première in Paris, where it was at first—incredible as it seems-a a failure. Much as one lias longed ever since for a dozen such failures, no opera has succeeded in beating Carmen on its own ground for half a century. The plot is based on a story by that brilliant writer Prosper Mérimée, who is certainly entitled to some of the credit, but never gets it. The first act opens on a square in Seville. Don Jose, corporal of the guard, is on duty with his men, and dreaming of his village sweetheart, Micaola. A cigarette factory is near by, and with military discipline as tax as it always is in opera, the fun begins as soon as the girls begin arriving at the factory. One of them, Carmen, resplendent, irresistible, whose love affairs are legion, is out for further conquest. Piqued at Don José's indifference, she sets confidently to work to lift him out of it-with such partial success as time allows before the hooter calls the girls to work. But José is to have no rest from the women. Micaela has called to see him, bringing him, as plausible excuse, a somewhat sentimental and quite unnecessary message from his mother. No sooner is she off and out of sight than a rumpus is heard in the factory, a babble of girls pours out of the door, headed by a termagant, dishevelled Carmen. She has picked a quarrel with another girl and knifed her. Sullen and smouldering, she is put under arrest, but recovers her debonair insouciance when Jose is set to guard her. With practised art, she reduces him to abject and pitiable slavery, tempts him with a rendezvous, kills his scruples with a glance, and secures the loosening of her bonds. Then, as she is being led away under escort, she frees her hands, bowls Jos6 over as it has been arranged between them, and escapes in the crowd.

Contributors

Conductor: Frederick Hey

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN

: Vaudeville

WEE GEORGIE WOOD (in 'Wee
Macgreegor ')
LENA CHISHOLM AND ORD
HAMILTON (in Something New)
HARRY HEMSLEY (in Child
Impersonations)
CLAUDE HULBERT AND ENID
TREVOR
(in Some More Nonsense)
ANN PENN (Impersonations)
KEITH WILBUR (The New Zealand
Mimic)
THE ORCHESTRA under the direction of LESLIE. WOODGATE
TMPERSONATIONS of three kinds— -L Ann Penn mimicking her contemporaries, Keith Wilbur emulating various animals and musical instruments, Harry Hemsley with his ' family ' of ' children.' Ann Penn is an established favourite with the radio audience. Those who think her an American are wrong ; she was born in England, though she began her career in the States. She first returned to England as a star of musical comedy until a theatrical bigwig, chancing to overhear her ' impressions ' at a party, vaudeville and revue claimed her.
Keith Wilbur leaves next week for a tour of America; we shall not be hearing him again for some time.
Claude Hulbert and Enid Trevor are, of course, husband and wife. She is the daughter of Colonel Philip Trevor , whose name is known to sportsmen for his cricket and football writings in The Daily Telegraph. She is a little depressed by the verdict of her daughter Jill, who, last time she and her husband were broadcasting, remarked: ' I fink I'll go to bed early tonight, mummie— then I won't have to listen-in !' -

Contributors

Unknown: Georgie Wood
Unknown: Lena Chisholm
Unknown: Claude Hulbert
Unknown: Keith Wilbur
Unknown: Ann Penn
Unknown: Keith Wilbur
Unknown: Harry Hemsley
Unknown: Ann Penn
Unknown: Keith Wilbur
Unknown: Claude Hulbert
Unknown: Enid Trevor
Unknown: Colonel Philip Trevor

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE and his ORCHESTRA from THE MAY
FAIR HOTEL








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