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Listings

: THE DAILY SERVICE

from page 93 of ' New Every Morning '

: HOUSEKEEPING FOR FUN

Minnie Pallister

Contributors

Unknown: Minnie Pallister

: THE BBCSCOTTISH ORCHESTRA

Leader, J. Mouland Begbie
Conductor, Guy Warrack
European Rhapsodies

Contributors

Leader: J. Mouland Begbie

: A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by Robert Taylor
(From Scottish)

Contributors

Unknown: Robert Taylor

: SONG AND DANCE

Popular dance music and songs on gramophone records

: BOBBY HOWELL ANDHIS BAND

from the Granada, Clapham Junction

: FALKMAN AND HISAPACHE BAND

with Tessa Deane

Contributors

Unknown: Tessa Deane

: 'GETTING OFF' and 'SALLY'

Two short stories by Dora M. Broome , read by Mary Eastwood

Contributors

Stories By: Dora M. Broome
Read By: Mary Eastwood

: ' THE MUSIC GOES ROUND'

Gramophone record All-Sorts

: DUDLEY BEAVEN

at the Organ of the Granada, Woolwich

: THE BBCMIDLAND ORCHESTRA

Conducted by Eric Warr
David Branson (pianoforte) Beethoven's superiority over his contemporaries was largely due to the fact that he was never content to go on re-duplicating a pattern, and the G major Concerto shows one or two interesting points of departure from conventional concerto form. The most striking is the entry of the solo instrument at the commencement of the first movement, where it quickly announces the first sentence of the principal subject, which is then completed by the orchestra.
Display is an essential characteristic of the concerto, and Beethoven never fails to recognise this. There is therefore much brilliant embroidery for the solo instrument and due provision is made in this, as in his other concertos, for the introduction of cadenzas at the usual points. Certainly he directs the cadenza in the Rondo to be a short one, but by inference the cadenza in the first movement may be of the usual length. At any rate' he made no attempt to forestall some recent critics and eliminate the cadenza entirely.
The slow movement is a remarkable dialogue between piano and orchestra. The contrast between the stern staccato phrases of the strings and the soft pleading tones of the piano is as near a satisfactory fusion of music and poetic feeling as seems possible.

Contributors

Conducted By: Eric Warr
Pianoforte: David Branson

: JACK HARRIS AND HIS BAND

with Pat Taylor
Dinah Miller
Hughie Diamond

Contributors

Unknown: Pat Taylor
Unknown: Dinah Miller
Unknown: Hughie Diamond

: THE FIRST NEWS

including Weather Forecast

: A Sonata Recital

Winifred Small (violin)
Maurice Cole (pianoforte)

: STOP

For the Sixth Season and One Hundred and Seventy-second time, we silence the mighty roar of London and from its great crowds we bring to the microphone some of the interesting people who are
IN TOWN TONIGHT
Introducing unusual stories from every walk of life
Flashes from the News of the Week and ' Standing on the Corner'
(Interviews with the Man in the Street)
Produced by C. F. Meehan

Contributors

Produced By: C. F. Meehan

: SING SONG

A Saturday Night Entertainment
TOMMY HANDLEY ,
RUPERT HAZELL , and ELSIE DAY as Hosts and Hostess with HARRY HEMSLEY
Marvellous Child Studies
THE RADIO REVELLERS and THE THREE IN HARMONY in individual and collective syncopation and CARYLL and MUNDY
The Inimitable Comedy Duo
THE BBC VARIETY
ORCHESTRA
Programme produced and conducted by Ernest Longstaffe
Do join in the choruses if you feel like it

Contributors

Unknown: Tommy Handley
Unknown: Rupert Hazell
Conducted By: Ernest Longstaffe

: THE THIRD NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: AMERICAN COMMENTARY

A weekly commentary on American
Affairs
Raymond Gram Swing
(From America)

: A PIANOFORTE RECITAL

by Arthur Benjamin

Contributors

Unknown: Arthur Benjamin

: 'SO WHAT?!'

An After-Dinner Revue by Joyce Lustgarten and Muriel Levy
Lyrics by Joyce Lustgarten
Music by Henry Reed with Taylor Frame
The Three Semis
Frederick Allen
Jessie Driver
Eileen Draycott
Donald Avison
Wilfred Pickles
James Miller
Henry Reed and Maurice Arnold at the pianos
Produced by David Porter
(From North)

Contributors

Revue By: Joyce Lustgarten
Unknown: Joyce Lustgarten
Music By: Henry Reed
Unknown: Frederick Allen
Unknown: Jessie Driver
Unknown: Eileen Draycott
Unknown: Donald Avison
Unknown: Wilfred Pickles
Unknown: James Miller
Unknown: Henry Reed
Unknown: Maurice Arnold
Produced By: David Porter

: Sharks Permitting

Robert Gibbings
It was when visiting the South Seas a few years ago that Robert Gibbings first saw tropical fish in their natural surroundings, and decided there and then that in these rainbow-hued creatures of the coral lagoons lay the perfect subject-matter for the artist. To paint the fish from above the water's surface was impossible, so he equipped himself with diving apparatus, a special pencil, and non-soluble drawing materials, and set about the task of producing his famous under-water pictures which have appeared as illustrations to close on fifty books.
Robert Gibbings has painted tropical fish in the South Seas, in Bermuda - which he found somewhat disappointing - and in the Red Sea where, foot for foot, there is as great a variety of coral as anywhere else in the world. In his broadcast today he will describe what it is like working in the deathly quiet, limpid-green depths of the tropical seas, surrounded by fishy models which show not the slightest fear of the artist. The extraordinary diversity, colour, and beauty of the under-water scenes in such places may defy description, but not the eye of the artist.
From time to time
Robert Gibbings has had encounters with sharks - none of them, however, sufficiently serious to dissuade him from his purpose.

Contributors

Speaker: Robert Gibbings

: JACK JACKSONAND HIS BAND

with Helen Clare *
Jack Cooper
Joe Ferrie
The Three Jackdaws from the Dorchester Hotel

Contributors

Unknown: Helen Clare
Unknown: Jack Cooper
Unknown: Joe Ferrie

: DANCE MUSIC

on gramophone records








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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