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Listings

: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 101 of ' New Every Morning'

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Regional Geography
' Northern Mexican Ranch Country '
G. Pfeifer
This morning Dr. Pfeifer, of the University of Bonne, is to take you with him on a journey he once made by car from Hermosillo, in the interior of Sonora, one of the biggest States in Mexico, to the coast.
A rough journey in blazing heat ; car loaded with cans of petrol and hung with water-bags ; roads bumpy ; blankets to sleep under through the cold nights. You will start in the morning while it is still cool, and by noon will have climbed to a height of 1,500 feet. A marvellous view, cactus trees 30 feet high, cactus plants with flowers of lovely colours.
You will push on and come to cattle ranches; see cows with their noses like pin-cushions from eating cactus. You will lunch with cowboys-called vaqueros-on maize cakes and meat as tough as leather.
On to the coast, and breakfast off turtle.
Dr. Pfeifer will show you other pictures of Sonora-Spanish mining towns beautifully laid out, places eastward where oaks grow on pleasant land, and the mountains are dark with pine trees. Before he finishes, you will feel you have actually been to Mexico and you will certainly want to go there.

Contributors

Unknown: G. Pfeifer

: THE BBCWELSH ORCHESTRA

Leader, Frank Thomas
Conducted by Mansel Thomas
Elsie Griffin (soprano)

Contributors

Leader: Frank Thomas
Conducted By: Mansel Thomas
Soprano: Elsie Griffin

: A BALLAD CONCERT

Marguerite Natalia (soprano)
Donald Campbell (bass)

Contributors

Soprano: Marguerite Natalia
Bass: Donald Campbell

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Interlude
2.5 Your Home and Mine
' Roofs of all Sorts '
GEOFFREY BOUMPHREY
2.25 Interlude
2.30 British History
' Time : Clocks and Calendars ' a dramatic interlude written by NAOMI MITCHISON

Contributors

Unknown: Geoffrey Boumphrey
Written By: Naomi Mitchison

: MEN TALKING

In the eighteenth century, watches were made to tell not only the time of day but also the season of the year and many things about the sun, moon, and stars. In 1752 the British parliament passed a special Act ordering that eleven days should be dropped from the calendar, and that the year should begin on January 1, instead of March 25.
Today you are going to hear about some of the early ways of measuring time, and how clocks gradually became more and more complicated. The second part of the broadcast is a Dramatic Interlude, in which you will hear why we have to lose eleven days in 1752, and what the people of the time thought about it.

: AN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT

by the Combined
BOURNEMOUTH AND
EASTBOURNE
MUNICIPAL ORCHESTRAS Conducted by Richard Austin
Jelly d'Aranyi (solo violin) from the Winter Gardens, Eastbourne
Brahms's Violin Concerto in D is one of the three or four greatest concertos written for the instrument. It was composed in 1878 when Brahms was forty-five years of age. The first performance took place at a Gewandhaus Concert at Leipzig on January 1, 1879, with Joachim as soloist and Brahms as conductor. Seven weeks later Joachim played the Concerto at the Crystal Palace with great success.
The history of Borodin's Second Symphony is closely linked with that of his opera, Prince Igor. The first ideas for the Symphony occurred to him early in 1869, but in April of that year Stassov suggested the opera subject to him, and for a time he devoted all his energies to Igor. Then he decided (temporarily) that the subject was unsuitable. ' Don't worry about it ', he wrote to Stassov. ' The material won't be wasted. It will all go into my Second Symphony '. Accordingly the first movement of the Symphony was written in 1871. During the period 1874-76 he was working at both opera and Symphony, and the last two movements of the Symphony were based on themes originally intended for an epilogue to Prince Igor.

Contributors

Conducted By: Richard Austin

: JACK HARRIS AND HIS BAND

with PAT TAYLOR and FRED LATHAM

Contributors

Unknown: Pat Taylor
Unknown: Fred Latham

: THE FIRST NEWS

including Weather Forecast

: Book Talk HUMOROUS BOOKS

J. D. Woodruff

Contributors

Unknown: J. D. Woodruff

: HAYDN-4

String Quartets, Op. 3 played by The Hirsch String Quartet:
Leonard Hirsch (violin) ; Reginald Stead (violin) ; Sydney Errington (viola) ; Leonard Baker (violoncello)
Quartet in A, Op. 3, No. 6
1 Presto. 2 Adagio. 3 Minuetto. 4 Scherzando
(From Manchester)

Contributors

Violin: Leonard Hirsch
Violin: Reginald Stead
Violin: Sydney Errington
Viola: Leonard Baker

: THE BBC MILITARY BAND

Conductor, B. Walton O'Donnell

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell

: THE FOL-DE-ROLS

The Seaside Summer Show
Sketches and Lyrics by Greatrex Newman
With a cast of popular artists selected from the resident ' Fol-de-
Rols ' companies at Hastings, Eastbourne, and Llandudno
The BBC Variety Orchestra conducted by Charles Shadwell
Produced by George Royle
The Fol-de-Rols will broadcast again on Saturday at 4.0 in the Regional programme

Contributors

Unknown: Greatrex Newman
Conducted By: Charles Shadwell
Produced By: George Royle

: SHAKESPEARE

' Acting Shakespeare'
Edith Evans
Today's talk in this series on Shakespeare in the theatre concerns the acting of his plays. It is to be given by a distinguished actress, who has scored many of her successes in Shakespearean roles. Edith Evans attracted attention by her first appearance on any stage as Cressida. That was twenty years ago. She was still attracting attention six months ago by her performance as the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet in John Gielgud 's production at the New Theatre, and as recently as a few weeks ago as Rosalind in As You
Like It at the Old Vic. In 1918 she toured with Ellen Terry as Mistress Ford in the Basket scene from The Merry Wives of Windsor, and as Nerissa in the Trial scene from The Merchant of Venice, so a great actress of today can speak at first hand of a great actress of yesterday. Listeners will remember her broadcast in the part of Cleopatra in Antony and Cleopatra to Godfrey Tearle 's Antony in February, 1934.

Contributors

Unknown: Edith Evans
Unknown: Edith Evans
Unknown: John Gielgud
Unknown: Ellen Terry
Unknown: Godfrey Tearle

: THE THIRD NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: THE BBC THEATRE ORCHESTRA

Leader, Montague Brearley
Conducted by Harold Lowe

Contributors

Conducted By: Harold Lowe

: A SHORT MID-WEEK SERVICE

from the Concert Hall, Broadcasting
House

: A RECITAL

ZOLTAN SZEKELY (violin)
BELA BARTOK (pianoforte) Virtuoso and Composer
Zoltan Szekely is not only a brilliant violin virtuoso, but also a notable composer. He studied the violin with Hubay, and composition with Kodaly. A violin sonata of his was chosen for performance at the International Music Festival in Venice. He made his debut as a violinist with the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra.
Bela Bartók
Hungary can boast of at least four great composers-Liszt, Dohnányi, Kodaly, and Bartok. The names of the last two composers are usually linked together, not, however, because their styles necessarily resemble each other-each has a distinctive individuality-but because they are contemporaries and have joined forces in the collection and revival of Hungarian or Magyar folk song. Their achievements in this direction are similar to those of Cecil Sharp and Vaughan Williams with regard to English folk song. While Bartok's music is allstrongly nationalistic in colour and idiom, particularly from a rhythmic point of view, it shows the stamp of a powerful and original musical mind, which if sometimes challenging in its love of crude rhythms and dissonant harmony commands respect and arouses intense interest.

Contributors

Violin: Zoltan Szekely








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