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Listings

: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 75 of ' When Two or Three'

: Weather Forecast

for Farmers and Shipping

: THE BBC NORTHERN ORCHESTRA

Leader, Alfred Barker
Conductor, T. H. MORRISON
ERIC GOLDIE (baritone)
Semiramide was the last opera Rossini wrote for Italian audiences, and for an odd reason. He wrote Semiramide with far greater care than was his habit, and the reception, probably in consequence, was very cold ; Rossini thereupon wiped his hands of Italian audiences and resolved to establish himself elsewhere. Opportunely, he received an invitation to go to London and to write a new opera for the King's Theatre, for which he was to get £240 (he had already had £200 for Semiramide, almost a maximum payment in those days).
From London he went to Fans, accepted the post of musical director at the Theatre Italien, produced Semiramide, amongst other operas, with a success rightly due to it, and settled down in Paris for the rest of his life.

Contributors

Leader: Alfred Barker
Conductor: T. H. Morrison
Conductor: Eric Goldie

: THE COMMODORE GRAND ORCHESTRA

Directed by HARRY DAVIDSON
Relayed from
The Commodore Theatre,
Hammersmith Second Selection of Wilfred Sanderson's Songs

Contributors

Directed By: Harry Davidson

: The Coventry Hippodrome Orchestra

Conducted by Charles Shadwell
Relayed from The Hippodrome Theatre, Coventry
(D)
North National will radiate the National Programme from 3.0

Contributors

Conducted By: Charles Shadwell

: HAROLD RAMSAY

At the Organ of the Granada, Tooting Popular Medley
Waltz Medley, The Elegant Eighties

: THE B B C

MILITARY BAND
Conductor, B. WALTON O'DONNELL
ARTHUR CRANMER (baritone)

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell
Baritone: Arthur Cranmer

: TROISE AND HIS MANDOLIERS with

DON CARLOS (tenor)

Contributors

Tenor: Don Carlos

: Five Hours Back

A Short-wave Relay of what morning Listeners in America are hearing this afternoon
FRANK BLACK AND HIS ORCHESTRA

: THE FIRST NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Bulletin for Farmers

: Sports Talk

'Twelve Miles an Hour'
A Talk on the early days of motoring
J. C. CRITCHLEY
Way back in the early 'nineties motorcars were sometimes clumsily termed ' horseless carriages '.
Listeners will hear all about these fascinating pioneering days from J. C. Critchley. He took part in the historic ' emancipation drive' to Brighton in which twenty vehicles arrived out of an approximate total of fifty starters-and of the few who finished there were two who had to pocket their pride and get a ' lift ' on a railway train for the greater part of the journey. Montague Grahame-White will be mentioned in this talk. And Critchley will tell of the amazing way in which this veteran motorist successfully managed to pilot his car fifty miles, despite the fact that its steering-gear was hopelessly out of action.

Contributors

Unknown: J. C. Critchley
Unknown: J. C. Critchley.
Unknown: Montague Grahame-White

: All Nationals except Droitwich A Recital

by MARY BONIN (soprano)
Mary Bonin
was bom in Russia, but has lived in England since the age of three. Miss Bonin began her career as a dancer at the age of ten, and. four years later, during the war, began to sing at concerts and in hospitals. After a course of serious study Miss Bonin gave several recitals and appeared in opera at the Old Vic. She first broadcast in 1925, and since that time has been heard on several occasions from Milan. Miss Bonin's artistic interests are not confined to music alone, for she has won considerable success at painting and sculpture.
6.45 Welsh Interlude
' Cymhleth y Taeog' Sgwrs Cymraeg, gan HENRY LEWIS

Contributors

Soprano: Mary Bonin
Soprano: Mary Bonin
Unknown: Henry Lewis

: The Saturday Magazine

A Week-end Programme including ' In Town Tonight'
Edited by A. W. HANSON

Contributors

Edited By: A. W. Hanson

: THE BBC ORCHESTRA

(Section C)
Led by MARIE WILSON
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
STUART ROBERTSON
(bass-baritone) The overture ' The Marriage of Camacho ', written at the age of sixteen, is a very charming work and is, in fact, the best part of the opera, which unfortunately suffers from a weak libretto based on an episode from ' Don Quixote '. When it was produced at Berlin it ran for one night only.
This is incidental music to the children's play, The Starlight Express, written by Algernon Blackwood and Violet Pearn, which was put on at the Kingsway Theatre during the war. Elgar has written very little incidental stage music, but for at least two reasons he took pleasure in providing music for this play-he made use of a real understanding of the young and a love of writing for and about them (consider only the ' Wand of Youth ' and ' Nursery ' Suites), and he sought relaxation from his war-inspired and patriotic compositions, which formed the major part of his work in the first years of the war.
Alexis Chabrier , born in 1841 (died
1894), is one of those few but distinguished composers who practically taught themselves. He studied law, but fortunately preferred music. His music is brilliant, witty, and full of colour, his ' Spanish Rhapsody ' affording a very famous example of all these qualities. He wrote operas, the most famous of them being Le rot malgre lui, which is still sometimes performed. He had a remarkable influence on the French composers who succeeded him, and he is considered to be one of the founders of modern French music.

Contributors

Unknown: Marie Wilson
Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Bass-Baritone: Stuart Robertson
Unknown: Alexis Chabrier

: ALFREDO AND HIS ORCHESTRA

in an interlude of Gypsy Revelry with ERIC BARKER intervening

Contributors

Unknown: Eric Barker

: THE SECOND NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: THE BBC THEATRE ORCHESTRA

Leader, MONTAGUE BREARLEY
THE BBC CHORUS
(Section C)
Conductor,
STANFORD ROBINSON

Contributors

Leader: Montague Brearley
Conductor: Stanford Robinson








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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