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: THE DAILY SERVICE

@ From page 36 of ' When Two or Three'

: Weather Forecast

@ for Farmers and Shipping

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

Casals (violoncello) : Komm' susser
Tod (Come, sweet death) (Bach, arr. Siloti) ; Toccato in G (Bach) ; Musette (Bach, arr. Pollain)
Adolf Bush (violin), Rudolf Serkin
(pianoforte), Aubrey Brain (horn) : Trio in E (Brahms)-I. Andante ; 2. Scherzo : Allegro; 3. Adagio mesto ; 4. Finale : Allegro con brio

Contributors

Violin: Adolf Bush
Violin: Rudolf Serkin
Pianoforte: Aubrey Brain
Unknown: I. Andante

: QUENTIN MACLEAN

At the Organ of The Trocadero Cinema,
Elephant and Castle

: CHARLES MANNING AND HIS ORCHESTRA

Relayed from
The Granada, Walthamstow

: An Organ Recital

by G. THALBEN-BALL
From the Concert Hall, Broadcasting
House

: THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL ORCHESTRA

Leader, BERTRAM LEWIS
Conductor, RICHARD AUSTIN
ORREA PERNEL (violin)
Relayed from
The Pavilion, Bournemouth
'Tannhäuser ! Richard Wagner ! ' said the Emperor, musingly, stroking his moustache in his habitual manner, ' I have never heard of the opera or the composer. And you think it is really good ? ' Princess Metternich, answered that she did, and the Emperor turned to his Lord Chamberlain, Bacciochi, who had charge of the Imperial theatres, and said to him in his off-hand way : ' Oh, Bacciochi, Princess Metternich is interested in an opera called Tannhauser, by one Richard Wagner , and wants to see it performed here in Paris-will you arrange to have it done ? ' Bacciochi bowed and replied : ' As your Majesty commands. But it will take some time ; a big opera cannot be staged in a day or so '. And that was how Tannhauser found its way to Paris.

Contributors

Leader: Bertram Lewis
Unknown: Richard Wagner
Unknown: Richard Wagner

: Speeches

by the Rt. Hon. MALCOLM MACDONALD , Secretary of State for the Colonies, and Sir ARNOLD HODSON , K.C.M.G.,
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Gold Coast, on the occasion of the opening of the Gold Coast Wireless Exchange at Accra

Contributors

Unknown: Rt. Hon. Malcolm MacDonald
Unknown: Sir Arnold Hodson

: THE BBC DANCE ORCHESTRA

Directed by HENRY HALL

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall

: THE FIRST NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Bulletin for Farmers

: THE BBC MILITARY BAND

Conductor
B. WALTON O'DONNELL
Weber's opera Euryanthe contains some of his finest music, but it is now rarely performed. It was killed, almost from the first, by the weakness of its libretto, which is one of the worst in operatic history. But the overture, one of Weber's best, has always been a favourite in the concert hall. It begins with an impetuous introduction ; the subject matter that follows is taken from songs in the opera, two of the chief being sung by the hero.
At one point, listeners will remark an impressive silent pause; here the composer indicated that the curtain should rise and reveal a tableau serving as an unspoken prologue to the drama.

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell

: TROISE AND HIS MANDOLIERS

with DON CARLOS (tenor)

Contributors

Tenor: Don Carlos

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

by FRANCIS TOYE

Contributors

Unknown: Francis Toye

: THE BBC ORCHESTRA

(Section C)
Led by LAURANCE TURNER
Conducted by FRANK BRIDGE
It is a notable fact that although Sir Edward German created an old English idiom, he found it unnecessary to adapt folk tunes or to imitate their style. In a letter to Irving concerning the incidental music to Henry VIII , German says: 'If you will have confidence in me, I will give you music that will have the necessary touches of old English style and be in keeping with the play. I am naturally desirous that such music shall be my own. I cannot feel that this is unreasonable since I propose to colour it as you wish, and to keep up the old-fashioned character
Actually, German had already experimented with this idiom in the ' Gypsy Suite ' which, though written a couple of years before, was not given its first performance- until 1892, when August Manns conducted it at the Crystal Palace.

Contributors

Unknown: Laurance Turner
Conducted By: Frank Bridge
Unknown: Henry Viii

: THE SECOND NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: Transatlantic Bulletin

RAYMOND SWING
(From America)

: Chamber Music

MRS. TOBIAS MATTHAY (narrator)
DALE SMITH (baritone)
B. J. DALE (organ)
JOHN COCKERILL (harp)
THE LESLIE BRIDGEWATER
QUINTET
A poem adapted from the German of Ernst Von Wildenbruch
Directed by PAUL CORDER
Melodrama is a dramatic composition in which a poem or piece of prose is recited to a musical accompaniment. Melodrama can be very impressive, as those who heard the last part of Schonberg's, Gurrelieder will testify. An interesting and attractive example of melodrama is Strauss's Enoch Arden , but there are some earlier examples, though not self-contained melodramas, such as the grave-digging scene in Beethoven's opera Fidelio and the dream in Egmont, the incantation scene in Weber's Der
Freischutz, and some of the numbers in Mendelssohn's incidental music to A Midsummer Night's Dream. Two Czech composers, Fibich and Janacek, have written a number of melodramas.
For instance, Fibich's Hippodameia' is a trilogy of dramas intended for performance on three consecutive evenings.
Among more recent composers, Sir
Alexander Mackenzie wrote several melodramas and Frederick Corder , whose The Witch's Song is being perfo'rmqd this evening. Under the direction of THE COMPOSER

Contributors

Baritone: Dale Smith
Baritone: B. J. Dale
Harp: John Cockerill
Directed By: Paul Corder
Unknown: Enoch Arden
Unknown: Alexander MacKenzie
Unknown: Frederick Corder

: DANCE MUSIC MAURICE WINNICK AND HIS ORCHESTRA

Relayed from San Marco

Contributors

Unknown: San Marco








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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