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: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 51 of 'When Two or Three'

: Food to Music

PHILIP THORNTON

Contributors

Unknown: Philip Thornton

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

The Busch String Quartet: Quartet in C, Op. 59, No. 3 (Razumovsky): 1. Introduzione (Andante con moto) Allegro vivace; 2. Andante con moto quasi allegretto; 3. Menuetto-Grazioso and Coda ; 4. Allegro molto (Beethoven)

: QUENTIN MACLEAN

At the Organ of The Trocadero Cinema,
Elephant and Castle Selection of Melodies by Vivian Ellis

Contributors

Unknown: Vivian Ellis

: CHARLES MANNING AND HIS ORCHESTRA

Relayed from
The Granada, Walthamstow

: An Organ Recital

by HAROLD RHODES
Relayed from
St. Mark's, North Audley Street

Contributors

Unknown: Harold Rhodes

: THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL ORCHESTRA

Leader, BERTRAM LEWIS
Conductor, RICHARD AUSTIN
NORENA SEMINO (violoncello)
Relayed from
The Paviliop, Bournemouth
It is a curious fact that Mendelssohn complained that the ' Italian Symphony ', completed in 1831, cost him some of the bitterest moments in his life, and in consequence it was not published until after his death, in 1847. Yet it is one of his finest works, perfect in workmanship and ful! of melodic charm and vital energy. We may ' safely conclude ' says Sir Donald Tovey , ' that Mendelssohn's own dissatisfaction with the " Italian Symphony " is rather an objection to the laws of human growth than the recognition of defects that self-criticism and revision can remedy. Certainly in the first three movements every bar and every note is in the right place, except for one tiny oversight in the slow movement which only a mistaken piety would leave uncorrected. As to the finale, no defect is discoverable ; but we can imagine that Mendelssohn could have wished to broaden its design towards the end'. Despite the excellence of this last movement, Mende!ssohn had intended to revise it.
In this second suite from ' Music to a Child's Play ', the first movement, a march, is the longest and most elaborately worked out. In ' Little Bells ' actual bells are included. In the third movement we are to suppose the ' Moths and Butterflies ' dancing in the sun, and in the fourth, ' Fountain Dance ', the sparkling water is vividly presented to us. Although in the fifth movement ' The Tame Bear ' is for the most part well-mannered, we are here and there reminded that he is, nevertheless, a bear and can still growl ; ' The Wild Bears ' bring the suite to an end with great energy.

Contributors

Leader: Bertram Lewis
Unknown: Sir Donald Tovey

: S A Programme of Gramophone Records

The New Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Malcolm Sargent : Suite, Otello (Coleridge-Taylor) — Dance ; Children's Intermezzo: Funeral March ; Willow Song ; Military March
The Grand Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Nils Grevilius : Intermezzo and Apache Dance (Jewels of the Madonna) (Wolf-Ferrari)
Grand Symphony Orchestra : Japanese Lantern Dance (Yoshitomo) ; Chinese Serenade (Siede)

Contributors

Conducted By: Malcolm Sargent
Conducted By: Nils Grevilius

: THE BBC DANCE ORCHESTRA

Directed by HENRY HALL

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall

: THE FIRST NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Bulletin for Farmers

: Variety

Relayed from
THE ARGYLE THEATRE
BIRKENHEAD
The Argyle, which through broadcasting has become a household word throughout Great Britain since April, 1931, when it gave its first relay, is one of the smallest and one of the most historic music-halls in the country. It goes back to the 'sixties, to the days of Chairmen and churchwardens and beer.
It is one of the few remaining theatres that are privately owned, and it has belonged to the same family for three generations. One Denis Grannell started it as a side-show to an hotel, and the billiard-rooms and bowling alleys still exist beneath the auditorium. His nephew, the late D. J. Clarke —that great showman ' The Guv'nor '—made its name and fortune. Today his son, Tom Clarke , carries on the tradition.
The Argyle was always a pioneer.
In the 'nineties it presented the first moving pictures and showed a marvel of the times-an early form of gramophone.
Lauder; the two Georges, Robey and Formby; Wilkie Bard ; even Charlie Chaplin ; all appeared there before making their great names. Four years ago, when ' The Guv'nor' decided to co-operate with the BBC in starting regular broadcasts from the Argyle, he gave the lead to music-hall proprietors throughout the country.

Contributors

Unknown: Denis Grannell
Unknown: D. J. Clarke
Unknown: Tom Clarke
Unknown: Wilkie Bard
Unknown: Charlie Chaplin

: A Pianoforte Recital

by LILIAS MACKINNON
Lilias Mackinnon was born in Aberdeen. She was the only member of her family to show any marked gifts for music. After having studied the piano under a local teacher, Miss Mackinnon was sent to the Royal Academy of Music where she worked for several years with Carlo Albanesi. In 1916 she won the Macfarren Gold Medal.
During the next few years Miss
Mackinnon gradually made a name for herself as a teacher and concert artist. Her name became linked with Scriabin, of whose music she made a deep study. She played Scriabin's Piano Concerto with Vaclav Talich when he made his debut in Britain with the Scottish Orchestra in 1925, and again in the same year with Serge Koussevitzky at the Scriabin Memorial Concert in London.
Miss Mackinnon is very well known in Paris where she has often given recitals.
Scriabin's orchestral works may or may not be the masterpieces that his admirers claim they are. But about his piano pieces there can be no doubt. They are beautifully adapted to the instrument-Scriabin was himself a magnificent pianist-and entitle their composer to be ranked beside Liszt and Debussy among the greatest piano composers since Chopin. This is true of his smaller piano pieces-preludes and so on-even more than of his sonatas. He excelled in the miniature forms and his little pieces are perfectly polished gems, exquisite epigrams. He is the musical equivalent of Heinrich Heine.

Contributors

Unknown: Lilias MacKinnon
Unknown: Lilias MacKinnon
Unknown: Carlo Albanesi.
Unknown: Vaclav Talich
Unknown: Serge Koussevitzky
Unknown: Heinrich Heine.

: The first performance of City of Music

A new Pot-pourri of Viennese Music
This Pot-pourri will be repeated in the Regional programme tomorrow night.

: THE SECOND NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: Transatlantic Bulletin

RAYMOND SWING
(From America)

: THE LESLIE BRIDGEWATER QUINTET

MIGNON NEVADA
(soprano)
Mignon" Nevada, a direct descendant of George Washington, has largely associated herself with American songs. In 1931 Mme. Nevada appeared in a Festival of American Music given at Homburg, and in the following year took part in the Washington bi-centenary celebrations in Paris.

: DANCE MUSIC

SYDNEY KYTE AND HIS BAND
Relayed from The Piccadilly Hotel
11.0 11.45 London National only (261.1 m.)
TELEVISION (low definition)
By the Baird Process 'Hungarian Goulasch'
Devised and produced by EUSTACE ROBB
HARRIET BENNETT (songs)
JOHN HENDRIK (songs)
DERRA DE MORODA (in authentic National dances)
(assisted by Richard Ellis ) RAY ESPINOSA and GEOFFREY ESPINOSA
(dances) GEORGE HARRIS (the stage and screen comedian)
SYDNEY JEROME'S ORCHESTRA

Contributors

Produced By: Eustace Robb
Produced By: Harriet Bennett
Songs: John Hendrik
Assisted By: Richard Ellis
Assisted By: Ray Espinosa
Assisted By: Geoffrey Espinosa
Unknown: George Harris








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