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: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 99 of ' When Two or Three '

: HENRY CROUDSON

At the Organ of The Paramount
Theatre, Manchester
IN THE LATE AUTUMN of 1874 Robert Louis Stevenson wrote to his friend Mrs. Sitwell that he had heard three pieces of great music. One was a Mozart symphony, ' thoroughly Mozartian, and of the colour and scent of rose leaves. The second was Cherubini's Overture to Anacreon ; and that seemed to me the colour of green bronze. I know you will not laugh at these far-fetched analogies of mine ; but for the third I can give you none. It was a " Jota aragonesa" by one Glinka ; and it was better than gold ; yea, than much fine gold. If you have a chance, go to hear it. It is the breath of man's nostrils '. Others, besides Stevenson,

Contributors

Unknown: Robert Louis Stevenson

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Districts of England
' The River Thames '—5
' Oxford'
HUGH CHESTERMAN
Today Schools are to hear about one of the most famous and beautiful University cities in the world. Hugh Chesterman in his talk is to describe
Oxford's peculiar geographical position, with rivers on three sides ; and you will hear how a castle and two monasteries were built there. You will learn the names of the oldest colleges, and exactly what a University is.
Hugh Chesterman will describe the life of a student long ago, and present-day life in Oxford, its work and play. The Bodleian Library, founded in 1602 ; the busy High ; the life of the colleges, which are part of the University, and yet little self-governing communities in themselves ; the river with its college barges and labouring crews ; the roads that lead out of Oxford ; the soaring, self-confident beauty of Magdalen and the grey splendour of Merton-you will hear something about these and such matter-of-fact things as why Oxford is crowded.

Contributors

Unknown: Hugh Chesterman
Unknown: Hugh Chesterman

: THE RUTLAND SQUARE AND NEW VICTORIA ORCHESTRA

Directed by NORMAN AUSTIN
Relayed from
The New Victoria Cinema, Edinburgh

Contributors

Directed By: Norman Austin

: For the Schools: Tracing History Backwards: Government - Now and Then: 6: The Parish - Then

K.C. Boswell
Last week Commander King-Hall told you about the Parish Council as it exists to-day. This afternoon Mr. K.C. Boswell is to tell you about its fore-bear, the parish of olden times. The parish is the smallest unit in our local government, and you all live in one, whether in town or country. It owes its origin to the Church, and at first was concerned with church matters. During Elizabeth's reign, it was used to help in the work of relieving the poor.
There are many curious offices connected with the story of the parish, and it is of them that Mr. Boswell is going to speak to you. Sixteenth-century sextons, early nineteenth-century constables and beadles, linkmen who lighted fair ladies home in the days of the Sedan chair - all were romantic figures in the parish of long ago.

Contributors

Speaker: K.C. Boswell

: Biology

' How Life is Lived '—6
' Insects and Flowers'
Doris L. MACKINNON , D.Sc.
(Professor of Zoology, King's College,
University of London)
Though some flowers are fertilised by the wind, others hy water, some in tropical countries, by humming birds, and some in Java even by bats, insects are the commonest fertilisers of all ; and it is of nature's marvellous ways of adapting different flowers for different insects that Professor Doris Mackinnon is to talk to you this afternoon.
Pollination, as you know, means the transference of pollen to the female flower. Without the nectar in the flower, butterflies and moths, bees and wasps could not exist ; the nectar theirs, they cannot help carrying the pollen that sticks to them to the female flower and so fertilising it. Each depends for its existence on the other.
Colour and shape that help the day-flying insect to find the particular flower it is adapted to would be useless as a guide at night, and so nature give the tobacco plant the most potent scent to attract the night-flying moth. Snap-dragons and broom have closed flowers and so they are adapted for the bumble-bee that is heavy enough to open them.

Contributors

Unknown: Doris L. MacKinnon
Unknown: Professor Doris MacKinnon

: EVENSONG

Relayed from Westminster Abbey
Order of Service
Psalms 32-34
Lesson, Isaiah 40, 1-17, 25-end Magnificat (Walmisley in D) Lesson, Luke vii, 36-50
Nunc Dimittis (Walmisley in D)
Anthem, Lift up your heads (Handel)
Hymn, Praise the Lord ! ye heavens, adore Him (A. and M. 292)

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Clemens Krauss: Scherzo (Symphony No. 4, in E flat) (The Romantic (Bruckner)
The Lamoureux Orchestra of Paris, conducted bv Albert Wolff: Viennese Rhapsody (Florent Schmitt)
Friedrich Schorr (bass-baritone) with The London Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Robert Heger: Prometheus (Wolf)
Brussels Royal Conservatoire Orchestra, conducted by Desire Defauw: Mephisto Waltz (Liszt)
Friedrich Schorr (bass-baritone) with Orchestra of The Berlin State Opera, conducted by Leo Blech: Wotan's Farewell and Magic Fire Music (Act III, Die Walkure) (Wagner)

: An Organ Recital

by PHILIP TAYLOR
Relayed from
The Town Hall, Cheltenham

Contributors

Unknown: Philip Taylor

: THE BBC DANCE ORCHESTRA

Directed by HENRY HALL

Contributors

Directed By: Henry Hall

: THE FIRST NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

Bach Celebration under the direction of C. SANFORD TERRY , Litt.D., Mus.D., LL.D. (Hon. Fellow of Clare College,
Cambridge)
HARPSICHORD MUSIC played by ALICE EHLERS
English Suite No. 2, in A minor
1. Prelude ; 2. Allemande; 3. Courante ; 4. Sarabande ; 5. Bourree I and II ; 6. Gigue

Contributors

Unknown: Sanford Terry
Played By: Alice Ehlers

: German

MAx KROEMER

Contributors

Unknown: Max Kroemer

: Danubian Clues to European Peace-7

' The Creation and Present Position of the Little Entente and the Achievement of the Balkan Pact'
WICKHAM STEED

Contributors

Unknown: Wickham Steed

: 'Liebelei'

A Play by ARTHUR SCHNITZLER
Translated from the German by P. MORTON SHAND
' Liebelei ' was broadcast in the Regional programme on Tuesday

Contributors

Play By: Arthur Schnitzler
Unknown: P. Morton Shand

: ' I've got to have Music'

Presented by AUSTEN CROOM-JOHNSON
All orchestrations by ERIC SIDAY
The Singers
ANNE LENNER
PAT O'MALLEY
DOROTHY LEIGH
The Orchestra
ERIC SIDAY
AUSTEN CROOM-JOHNSON
ALBERT HARRIS
MAX GOLDBERG
REGINALD LEOPOLD
LAURIE and NORMAN PAYNE
LEW DAVIS
DICK BALL
RONNIE GUBERTINI
E. O. POGSON
GEORGE MELACHRINO

Contributors

Presented By: Austen Croom-Johnson
Singers: Anne Lenner
Singers: Pat O'Malley
Unknown: Dorothy Leigh
Unknown: Eric Siday
Unknown: Austen Croom-Johnson
Unknown: Albert Harris
Unknown: Max Goldberg
Unknown: Reginald Leopold
Unknown: Norman Payne
Unknown: Lew Davis
Unknown: Dick Ball
Unknown: Ronnie Gubertini
Unknown: E. O. Pogson
Unknown: George Melachrino

: THE SECOND NEWS

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: A SHORT MID-WEEK SERVICE

Conducted by the Rev. W. H. ELLIOTT
Relayed from
St. Michael's, Chester Square

Contributors

Unknown: Rev. W. H. Elliott
Unknown: Chester Square

: 'Music of Glinka' THE BBC MIDLAND ORCHESTRA

Leader, ALFRED CAVE
Conducted by LESLIE HEWARD
Overture, Waltz, and Krakoviak (A
Life for the Tsar)
Souvenir of a Summer Night in Madrid Kamarinskaya Waltz Fantasy
March and Oriental Dances (Russian and Ludmilla)
-

Contributors

Leader: Alfred Cave
Conducted By: Leslie Heward

: DANCE MUSIC

THE CASANI CLUB ORCHESTRA
Directed by CHARLES Kunz
Relayed from Casani's Club

Contributors

Directed By: Charles Kunz








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