• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 24 of ' When Two or Three

: Shopping and Cooking

' Food values in the Kitchen '
V. H. MOTTRAM
Professor of Physiology in the University of London

Contributors

Unknown: V. H. Mottram

: SIDNEY TORCH

At the Organ of The Regal,
Edmonton

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Regional Geography
Peoples of the World-10
Reindeer Hunters and Herders of the Tundra'
BOSWORTH GOLDMAN
This is the last Regional Geography talk this term, and the last of Mr. ROSWORTH Goldman 's three talks on Siberia. Last week he told you about the Southern Samoyed ; today he is to take you to the extreme north, to that part of Siberia touching the Arctic Ocean, to the portion of the Tundra that lies east of the Obdorsk Mountains.
Here is a flat, cold, desert, treeless plain, with low-growing vegetation. lichens, and moss, frozen for most of the year, and inhabited by the Southern Samoyed and the Tungus people (who originally came from China and whom the Samoyed call Aiya or ' younger brothers ').
The Samoyed and Tungus live in tepees or tents, and are dependent on reindeer for food, drink, and clothes. Their settlements are guarded, and their haulage is done by the snow-white Samoyed dog such as you see in Britain. They are less affected by the Russians, and therefore less civilised, than the Southern Samoyed. They are shy, and avoid the big rivers and places of trade. They have their peculiar habits and customs. The reindeer, on which they depend for survival, they use both as mounts and as pack-animals.

Contributors

Unknown: Bosworth Goldman
Unknown: Mr. Rosworth Goldman

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Alois Melichar : Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, in F (Bach)-i. Allegro; 2. Adagio; 3. Allegro; 4. Minuet

Contributors

Conducted By: Alois Melichar

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Nature Study
Round the Countryside-10
' Young Birds '
NOBLE ROLLIN
Young birds vary in the way they grow up. Much depends on whether they are active from the first, or whether they remain in the nest until they can i fly. Those that are restricted to the confines of a nest are often hatched in an almost naked state, blind and dependent on their parents for food and warmth. More active species that do not stay in the nest are hatched with their eyes open, have a warm covering of down, and, although guided and helped by their parents, search for their own food.
When fully feathered, the young may be coloured and marked like their parents, or 1 ike one of them, or they may be unlike either parent. One of the most interesting examples of difference between parents and young is shown bv the starling-the young of these dark, glossy-coated birds being pale brown.
Young birds have so many enemies that mortality is very high. Of the vast numbers hatched out, only comparatively few reach maturity. Many are now killed by a new enemy, the motor-car, and towards the end of the summer, when the number of young birds is at its height, the road claims a large toll.
Noble Rollin , who is to give this interesting talk, studies the habits of birds at his research station in Northumberland.

Contributors

Unknown: Noble Rollin
Unknown: Noble Rollin

: Early Stages in French

Lesson 10
E. M. STÉPHAN

: Talk for Sixth Forms

The Situation Abroad-3
Religion and the State (Germany,
Russia, Italy)
ARNOLD J. TOYNBEE
Research Professor of International History in the University of London, and Director of Studies in the Royal
Institute of International Affairs

: To the Unemployed

'This and That'
JOHN HILTON

Contributors

Unknown: John Hilton

: A Light Classical Concert

THE SYLVAN TRIO :
John Francis (flute) ; Sylvia Spencer
(oboe) j Millicent Silver (pianoforte)

Contributors

Flute: John Francis
Flute: Sylvia Spencer
Pianoforte: Millicent Silver

: THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND

Conductor,
B. WALTON O'DONNELL

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell

: The First News

including Weather Forecast and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

Contemporaries of Bach and Handel
3-Chamber Music
DAVID WISE (violin)
AMBROSE GAUNTLETT (viola da gamba)
ERNEST LUSH (harpsichord)
Sonata m A minor, Op. I, No. 3
Dietrich Buxtehtide (1637-1707)
1. Adagio, Allegro; 2. Lento, Vivace, Presto

Contributors

Viola: Ambrose Gauntlett

: French

E. M. STÉPHAN

: Freedom and Authority

in the Modern World
' The Liberty of the Individual'
The Rt. Hon. Lord HUGH CECIL ,
LL.D., M.P.

Contributors

Unknown: Lord Hugh Cecil

: ' Charlemagne '

A Comedy with Music
Music by WALTER LEIGH
Lyrics by V. C. CLINTON-BADDELEY
THE B.B.C. VARIETY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by MARK H. LUBBOCK
Adaptation and production by LAURENCE GILLIAM
Based on the original scenario by Yves Mirande for the Pathe-Natan film,
' Charlemagne'
By arrangement with the Academy
Cinema, London, W.I
Characters
The action takes place on Baron St. Mayer's yacht, on a Desert Island, and in Paris
Time, the Present
(' Charlemagne' was broadcast in the Regional programme last night. Pictures from the film version will be found on page 13)

Contributors

Music By: Walter Leigh
Conducted By: Mark H. Lubbock
Production By: Laurence Gilliam
Unknown: Yves Mirande
Charlemagne: Sam Livesey
Rose Val: Yvette Darnac
Baron St Mayer: Bruce Winston
The Doctor: Matthew Boulton
The Author: John Cheatle
Malet: Bruce Belfrage
The Captain: Andrew Churchman
Second Stoker: Philip Wade
A Journalist: Leo Von Pokorny

: THE SIX OF US

CLIVE ERARD
RONALD HILL
JACK LORIMER and THE RADIO THREE

Contributors

Unknown: Clive Erard
Unknown: Ronald Hill
Unknown: Jack Lorimer

: The Second News

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: Current Economic Affairs

Sir WILLIAM BEVERIDGE , K.C.B.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir William Beveridge

: Gas'

ALLAN FERGUSON , D.Sc. (Assistant Professor of Physics, Queen Mary
College)
The many' amenities brought into our lives by scientific discoveries have become so much a matter of course that we pay little attention to them-until something goes wrong. Still less do we consider the concentrated effort that has been expended in generations of patient research to provide these amenities.
What a fascinating story, for example, is that of gas, from its first faint flickerings more than a century ago, when the peace of Amiens was made the occasion of the illumination of the Soho foundries, to the position today, when gas provides efficient light for our rooms, cooks our meals, contributes towards the solution of the smoke-problem in cities, and provides us with by-products essential to many important industries, and tq the comforts of our daily lives.
Storage, purification, transport, measurement : think of the problems involved in the supply of gas to such cities as London and Manchester-problems solved so quietly and efficiently that we, as consumers, hardly give them a thought.

Contributors

Unknown: Allan Ferguson

: A Recital

MARIA SANDRA (soprano)
FRANK LAFFITTE (pianoforte)

Contributors

Soprano: Maria Sandra
Pianoforte: Frank Laffitte

: DANCE MUSIC

LEW STONE AND HIS BAND
Relayed from The Hollywood








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel