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Listings

: THE DAILY SERVICE

From page 33 of ' When Two or Three

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

Jacqueline Blancard (pianoforte): Studies (Debussy)

Contributors

Pianoforte: Jacqueline Blancard

: For the Schools

Districts of England
The South West Corner - 2.
'The Cornish Coast'
A.K. HAMILTON JENKIN
In his talk this morning Mr. A.K. Hamilton Jenkin is to speak of the rocks and beaches of the Cornish coast. He will describe a typical fishing village, a fisherman's home, and the life and work of a fisherman. He will say something of Cornish dishes, of the old Cornish language and Cornish names. And finally he will discuss the changes that have come to Cornwall lately.
'"And having heard this talk, you will be able to compare the Cornish coast with the particular coast you know
Are the tides safer or more dangerous
Would you find saffron cakes at Thanet, and what colour are they? Would you like to spend your next holiday in Cornwall?

Contributors

Unknown: A. K. Hamilton Jenkin

: THE RUTLAND SQUARE

and NEW VICTORIA ORCHESTRA
Directed by NORMAN AUSTIN
Relayed from
The New Victoria Cinema, Edinburgh

Contributors

Directed By: Norman Austin

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

'Tracing History Backwards'
'Government Now and Then'
2.—' The Cabinet Then
K. C. BOSWELL

Contributors

Unknown: K. C. Boswell

: Biology-How Life is Lived

WINIFRED C. CULLIS , C.B.E., D.Sc., Professor of Physiology, London (Royal Free Hospital) School of Medicine for Women : 2. ' How we Develop Habits'

Contributors

Unknown: Winifred C. Cullis

: EVENSONG

Relayed from WESTMINSTER ABBEY
Psalms, 6, 7, 8
Lessons, Proverbs xvi, 1-19; James ii,
1-17
Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis (
Walford Davies in G)
Anthem, Almighty and Everlasting
God (Gibbons)
Hymn, The race that long in darkness pined (S.P. 96)

Contributors

Unknown: Walford Davies

: A Programme of Gramophone Records

The B.B.C. Symphony Orchestra, conductor, Adrian Boult : Tragic Overture (Brahms)
Arthur Rubinstein (pianoforte) and The London Symphony Orchestra, conducted bv Albert Coates : Concerto No. 2, in B flat (Brahms)
Brahms himself Rave this overture its name of ' Tragic.', but he did not give any other reason for his choice of title than is contained in the music. It was written at the same time as the Academic Festival Overture, in the summer of 1880, and may be considered its complement. Both overtures were first performed at Bres]au in the following year, and the performance was somewhat of an occasion, for Brahms had just been made a Doctor of Philosophy by the University of that city.
Brahms appeared as soloist in his Second Pianoforte Concerto on its first appearance; that was in the Christmas week of 1880, in Vienna. Nearly twenty-two years had elapsed since the First Pianoforte Concerto came out, and by contrast with the stress and conflict which sounds almost all through it, this second seems light-hearted. Happiness certainly inspired it, and its message is one of sanity and whole-hearted rejoicing. There are four movements, and Brahms himself explained that he added the second because the first and third were so simple that something bigger was needed between them.
It is dedicated to Brahms's old master,
Eduard Marzsen , as a token of the lifelong gratitude and affection which united the two men.

Contributors

Conductor: Adrian Boult
Pianoforte: Arthur Rubinstein
Unknown: Albert Coates
Unknown: Eduard Marzsen

: An Organ Recital

by GILBERT MILLS
Relayed from The Church of the Messiah, Birmingham

: ALFREDO CAMPOLI

and his
ORCHESTRA

: ' The First News'

including Weather Forecast and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

Handel Celebration
Under the direction of EDWARD J. DENT
Miscellaneous Harpsichord Music played by RUDOLPH DOLMETSCH
Chaconne in F (Third Collection No. 5)
Suite in F minor (First Collection No. 8)
Prelude., Fugue, Allemande, Courante

Contributors

Played By: Rudolph Dolmetsch

: German

MAX KROEMER

Contributors

Unknown: Max Kroemer

: ' Markets and Men' Rubber-I J. W. F. Rowe

This evening Mr. J. W. F. Rowe is to give the first of two talks on rubber. He will describe the various sources from which rubber is obtained, e.g., a British or Dutch rubber company's plantation, a Chinese plantation in Malaya, a Malay smallholding, a Dutch native rubber ' garden ', and so forth.
He will briefly sketch the development of modem production and consumption up to 1922, and relate the history of the British Restriction scheme, 1922 to 1928. And in this, and in his second talk on rubber next Thursday, he will compare the rubber situation at the end of the restriction era with its aspect in 1930. There is much ground to be covered in his second talk.

: Love needs a Waltz

A Modern Fairy Tale by James Dyrenforth to music by Kenneth Leslie-Smith
Love needs a Waltz ' was broadcast in the Regional programme on Tuesday

Contributors

Unknown: James Dyrenforth
Music By: Kenneth Leslie-Smith

: THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND

Conductor,
B. WALTON O'DONNELL in A Programme of Regimental Marches

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell

: ' The Second News'

including Weather Forecast and Forecast for Shipping

: A SHORT MID-WEEK SERVICE

Conducted by The Rev. W. H. ELLiorr
Relayed from
St. Michael's, Chester Square

: THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA

(Section D)
Led by LAURANCE TURNER
Conducted by AYLMER BUESST
Although everything in the Argentine is still in its youth, the sources of Argentine Folk Music have already become obscure. No one has yet been able to establish with any certainty what has been handed down from the Indian who inhabited the land before the Spanish Conquest, or what was brought over by the Spanish settlers and Conquisfadores. It is, however, generally believed that the contact of the popular Spanish songs and dances with the Indian probably produced the great variety of National Airs and Dances we today call Argentine Folk Music.
R. Q. Blarney Lafone's ' Scenes from
Catamarca ' have been inspired by the customs and folk tunes and rhythms common to the Northern Andine Provinces of the Argentine Republic. The only one which perhaps does not convey by its name alone a sufficient explanation is the ' Angelito ', the wake of an infant, which immediately follows the Preamble. This scene attempts to evoke once again the impression such a wake makes on the composer-the mumbled benedictus, the songs and the dances, as the little body lay in its coffin surrounded with candles and gaudy paper flowers, dressed in paper and with paper wings and crown.
The ' Chacarera' is a popular
Argentine dance of brilliant character. In ' Dona Elena Dances the Cueca' the composer wishes to convey the charm and grace of the dancer as well as the dance itself. ' Carnival Sunday ' is a typical scene of these parts, with its riotous singing, dancing and fighting. The work ends with a shorter and brighter version of the preamble.

Contributors

Unknown: Laurance Turner
Conducted By: Aylmer Buesst
Unknown: Dona Elena Dances

: DANCE MUSIC

THE GROSVENOR HOUSE DANCE BAND
Conducted by SYDNEY I.IPTON
Relayed from
Grosvenor House, Park Lane

Contributors

Conducted By: Sydney I.Ipton








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