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Listings

: THE DAILY SERVICE

Hymns, Ancient and Modern, Nos. 136 and 127

: ' Country Ways and Country Days'

Mr. A. G. STRRET

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. A. G. Strret

: QUENTIN MACLEAN

At The Organ of The Trocadero Cinema,
Elephant and Castle

: THE GROSVENOR HOUSE ORCHESTRA

Directed by Raymond A. Goddere
Relayed from Grosvenor House, Park Lane

Contributors

Directed By: Raymond A. Goddere

: Pianoforte 'Recital

by ERNEST LUSH

Contributors

Unknown: Ernest Lush

: THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA

Conductor, Sir DAN GODFREY
BASIL MAINE (Orator)
Relayed from The Pavilion, Bournemouth
Aithnr Bliss's Morning -Heroes, which the composer has described as ' A Symphony on War,' was first heard at the Noiwich Festival in 1930. The text for the separate movements have been drawn from Homer, Walt Whitman , Li-Tai-Po, Wilfred Owen , and Robert Nichols. The words given to the soloist are not sung, but recited; the cast, therefore, demands an orator, who declaims to musical accompaniment. The number to be performed this afternoon is from the 'Iliad ' and begins : ' So Andromache met Hector now, and with her went the handmaid, bearing in her bosom the tender boy, the little child, Hector's loved son, like unto a beautiful star.' The text then describes how Andromache with their child in her arms implores Hector not to go to battle, but to stay with her, lest the child become an orphan and the wife a widow. Hector is not to be moved. He prays to Zeus to protect his son and bids farewell to him and his mother. The text ends with these words: 'So spake glorious Hector, and took up his horsehair-crested hplmet; and his dear wife departed to her home, oft looking back and letting fall big tears.'

Contributors

Conductor: Sir Dan Godfrey
Conductor: Basil Maine
Unknown: Walt Whitman
Unknown: Wilfred Owen
Unknown: Robert Nichols.

: REGINALD FOORT

At The Organ of The Regal, Kingston-on-Thames

: The Children's Hour

' Pomona and the Motor Bandits '
A Dialogue Story by W. M. LETTS
With Incidental Music played by ERNEST Lush

Contributors

Story By: W. M. Letts
Played By: Ernest Lush

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

PIANOFORTE DUETS OF SCHUBERT
Played by BERKELEY MASON and ERNEST LUSH
Sonata in B flat

Contributors

Played By: Berkeley Mason
Unknown: Ernest Lush

: ' Man versus Microbe'

'Drugs and their Uses'

: Farmers' Talk

Professor R. G. WHITE : Hill Sheep'

Contributors

Unknown: Professor R. G. White

: ' Industrial Relations '—I

Mr. John HILTON (Professor of Industrial Relations in the University of Cambridge) :
' Personal Contacts '
The first of a new series that will analyse the relation between those who employ and those who are employed. Professor Hilton deals in his first talk with the various attitudes to ' personal contact' current in modern industrial conditions. Later he will touch on such fundamental problems of industry as collective bargaining, wage systems, staff welfare, labour control and method of co-operation between employers and employees. Four debates on issues raised in the talks will conclude the series.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. John Hilton

: THE FOUR MUSKETEERS

with MABEL PEARL at the Piano

: ' The Second News'

)
WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: 'India—II'

Sir JOHN PERRONET THOMPSON , K.C.S.I., K.C.I.E.
The second of three factual talks by Sir John Thompson , in explanation of the White Paper on India, which sets forth the Government's proposals for Indian Constitutional Reform.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir John Perronet Thompson
Unknown: Sir John Thompson

: Symphony Concert ADILA FACHIRI (Violin) THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA

(Section D)
(Led by LAURANCE TURNER )
Conductor, ADRIAN BOULT
The best known orchestral suite of Bach-or overture as he used to call this type of work--is the third; that is the one which contains
ADILA FACHIRI plays
Sir Alexander Mackenzie 's Concerto in E, with Section D of the Orchestra, in the Symphony Concert, tonight at 9.35. the famous Air in D. The one now to be played is not nearly so often heard, indeed, for some time it was questioned whether the suite was actually by Bach; but since the opening movement is practically the same as one of the numbers of the Christmas Cantata, published much later, there is no question as to its authenticity. Bach often used a piece of music he had written for one work again in another; one can fully understand that at times he had such pressure of work on hand that he was forced to have recourse to this device. The work is in the usual movements of the suite of those days, and contains the customary number of stately dance tunes.
Sir Alexander Mackenzie , by reason of his long association with the Royal Academy of Music-he was its Principal for thirty-six years, retiring in 1924-exercised a very powerful influence, not only on the generation now in its maturity, but on a younger school of composers and executives actively practising today. Sir Alexander's crowded life has witnessed the progress of British music from the days when the influence of Mendelssohn was all pervading, through the early years of the present century when a renaissance was unmistakably evident, to the present day when British composers take their rightful place in the esteem of the world. To this status Mackenzie has contributed invaluably. The concerto to be played this evening was written as long ago as 1885, and was first performed at the Birmingham Festival with Sarasate as soloist.
When Berlioz's opera, Benvenuto Cellini , was produced at Covent Garden in 1852, it was described as a ' grand semi-serious ' opera in three acts. It was not a success, in fact, no opera of Berlioz has been particularly successful either in Paris or abroad, yet the story of Benvenuto Cellini , which that supremely gifted artist wrote down himself in his autobiography, is one that readily lends itself to operatic, even melodramatic, treatment. The ' grand semi-serious ' description fits the situation like a glove; it would describe much of Berlioz and much of Cellini. Both took their art seriously and in a grand manner, yet the outlook of each was that of revolt, ironic in one case, and lawless in the other. It seems odd that so sympathetic an association should have led to failure. The story of the opera concerns the abduction of Teresa, the daughter of a high Papal officer, by Cellini, who, having stabbed an opponent, is condemned 'to death. He is pardoned, however, in order that he may complete his statue of Perseus. The overture of the opera, after a. tempestuous opening, follows the usual course. Airs from the opera are used; one of these is the big aria sung by Cellini himself.

Contributors

Conductor: Laurance Turner
Conductor: Adrian Boult
Unknown: Adila Fachiri
Unknown: Sir Alexander MacKenzie
Unknown: Sir Alexander MacKenzie
Unknown: Benvenuto Cellini
Unknown: Benvenuto Cellini

: A Reading from ' Will Shakespeare'

(Clemence Dane ), by IAN SINCLAIR PHAIL
(From Edinburgh)

Contributors

Unknown: Clemence Dane
Unknown: Ian Sinclair

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND, relayed from The Kit-Cat
Restaurant
(Shipping Forecast at 11.0)

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox








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