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Listings

: CRICKET

AUSTRALIA v. ENGLAND
Mr. A. F. KIPPAX : An Eye-witness Account of the day's play in the second Test Match.
Relayed from The Melbourne Cricket Ground.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. A. F. Kippax

: HAYDN HEARD and his BAND

Fom The West-End Cinema, Birmingham
(From Birmingham)

: REGINALD NEW

At The Organ of The Beaufort Cinema, Wash-wood Heath, Birmingham
(From Birmingham)

: EMANUEL STARKEY and his ORCHESTRA

From The Regal, Marble Arch

: Light Classical Concert

Freda Townson (Contralto)
The Grimson Piano Quartet: Ethel Hobday (Pianoforte); Jessie Grimson (Violin); Dorothy Jones (Viola); Robert Grimson (Violoncello)
Richard Strauss has made an interesting confession as to his methods of composing songs; these methods would not seem to differ from those employed by the majority of song-writers who take their art seriously, but are none the less revealing. 'For some time,' he says, 'I may have no impulse to compose at all. Then one evening I find myself turning the leaves of a volume of poetry; a poem will strike my eye. I read it through; it agrees with the mood I am in; and at once the appropriate music is instinctively fitted to it. I am in a musical frame of mind, and all I want is the right poetic vessel into which to pour my ideas. If good luck throws this in my way, a satisfactory song results.' Hugo Wolf had other methods and other stimuli. He differed from predecessors and from most of his contemporaries in the fact of being equally poet and musician. He was the first composer to regard the poem as an integral part of the whole and of equal importance with the music. He did not make his appeal through the music alone, but set his poem so that note for note, bar for bar, and phrase for phrase, the music interpreted the poem end the poem supplemented the music. He did not write for the voice accompanied by the piano, but for the voice and piano as an inseparable whole. Wolf's greatness lies not only in the beauty of the music of his songs, but in his supreme faculty of piercing to the very heart or a poem and finding there the music that he sought. He had something of the temperament of Schubert in his capacity for work. When the fit was on him he would compose songs in great number at great speed - two or three a week for months on end. In two years he wrote two hundred, almost without stopping, and then, as though exhausted and empty of all ideas, he composed absolutely nothing for three whole years.

Contributors

Contralto: Freda Townson
Pianoforte: Jessie Grimson
Violin: Dorothy Jones
Viola: Robert Grimson

: The Scottish Studio Orchestra

Directed by Guy Daines
(From Glasgow)
Schumann's hundred and odd songs were written practically all in one year, the year before his marriage. They are nearly all love songs and bear strong evidence of his obsession with thoughts of his betrothed. Schumann as a song-writer is in a direct line from Schubert ; he shows the same devotion to melody: but he had a cultivated literary sense that Schubert lacked, and he was, therefore, more nearly able to express the poet in his music; moreover, as the songs of a pianist, Schumann's songs are pianistically - but only in that respect - in advance of Schubert's. The main point of difference between them lies in the fact that Schubert, throughout his life, could not help pouring out songs without ceasing, whereas Schumann, being married, closed an incident in his career with the statement: 'I cannot venture to promise that I shall produce anything further in the way of songs, and am satisfied with that I have done'; and he was, indeed, satisfied. He writes to a friend expressing his distress that he is placed by a critic in the second rank of song-writers; 'I do not ask,' he wrote, 'to stand in the first rank, but I think I have some pretension to a place of my own.'
Grieg's claim to a place in the company of great song-writers is affected by his limitations; nearly all the one hundred and fifty songs that he wrote are seldom more than compact lyrics embraced within a single idea, or merely stretched upon a simple but unusual harmonic frame. His expressive and piquantly characteristic melody. attached to his novel and individual sense of harmony, give to Grieg's songs, however, a charm which it is often impossible to withstand.
(From Scottish Regional)

Contributors

Directed By: Guy Daines

: The Children's Hour

FIRST DAY OF REQUEST WEEK
Another adventure of Eustace the Pig, by C. E. HODGES
Songs by RONALD GOURLEY
'The Sea Trout' (Mortimer Batten)

Contributors

Unknown: C. E. Hodges
Songs By: Ronald Gourley
Unknown: Mortimer Batten

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

Bach's Pianoforte Music
Played by JAMES CHING
Two-Part Inventions, I-XV

Contributors

Played By: James Ching

: 'New Books'

Mr. BASIL DE SELINCOURT

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Basil De Selincourt

: PROMENADE CONCERT

(Christmas Season, 1932-3)
WAGNER
MAY BLYTH
HORACE STEVENS
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE )
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
Relayed from The Queen's Hall
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
ORCHESTRA
Overture, Tannhäuser
MAY BLYTH and Orchestra
Senta's Ballad (The Flying Dutchman)
Senta, who sings this ballad in the second act of The Flying Dutchman, is the daughter of Daland, a Norwegian sea captain. The scene is a room in which several girls are spinning, but Senta is not working. Her gaze, which is centred upon a picture of the Flying Dutchman hanging on the wall of the room, rouse? the curiosity of her companions. Presently she relates to them the legend of the Dutchman and his phantom .ship. The music begins with the motif of ' The Curse,' and continues with the ' Storm Music ' already foreshadowed in the overture. Senta narrates how the Dutchman is condemned to sail the seas for ever unless he can find a woman who will be faithful to him to death. With great emotion she now declares that such a woman can be found, and that it is she herself who will deliver the Dutchman from his terrible curse.
ORCHESTRA
Siegfried Idyll
Entrance of the Gods into Valhalla (The Rhine-gold)
Ride of the Valkyries (The Valkyrie)
HORACE STEVENS and Orchestra
Wotan's Farewell and Magic Fire Music (The
Valkyrie)
Brynhilda, the Valkyrie, has flagrantly disobeyed her father's command in endeavouring to shield Siegmund from death. In a fury Wotan has followed her to the Valkyrie's Rock, and after an impassioned scene, in which he is induced to lighten his daughter's punishment by making it possible for a hero to effect her deliverance, he proceeds to send her into a long sleep. True to his word, lie rings the rock round with an almost impassable barrier of fire, and taking a long and sorrowful farewell of hie erring daughter, he leaves her, descending through the fire to the valley below.
(Ticket.9 can be obtained from The British
Broadcasting Corporation, Broadcasting House, If. I ; The Queen's Hall, Langham Place, W.1 ; and usual Agents. Prices (including Entertainments Tax) : 7s. 6d., 6s., 5s. (reserved), 3s. (unreserved), Promenade (payment at doors only), 2s.)

Contributors

Unknown: May Blyth
Unknown: Horace Stevens
Violin: Charles Woodhouse
Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Unknown: May Blyth
Unknown: Horace Stevens

: 'The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: Sir H. KINGSLEY WOOD, M.P. : 'The Post Office'

Now that the Post Office has recovered its breath and the public their tempers, Christmas boxes but a fragrant memory, and Mount Pleasant looking itself again, the P.M.G. comes to tho microphone with a calm survey of the work of his organization. Post Office services have grown steadily throughout the year, and Sir Kingsley Wood will touch tonight on many ways not generally known in which they meet the ever-growing need for safe and speedy communication.

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Kingsley Wood

: DANCE MUSIC

MAURICE WINNICK and his ORCHESTRA, from THE
CARLTON HOTEL
(Shipping Forecast at 11.0)

Contributors

Unknown: Maurice Winnick








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