• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: 'A PACKET OF ElGHTEENTH CENTURY LETTERS’— II

Mrs. V. M. MACDONALD

Contributors

Unknown: Mrs. V. M. MacDonald

: Reginald New

At THE ORGAN of THE BEAUFORT CINEMA, BIRMINGHAM
(From Midland Regional)

: THE COMMODORE GRAND ORCHESTRA

Under the direction of JOSEPH MUSCANT
From THE COMMODORE THEATRE, HAMMER-
SMITH

: THE B.B.C. THEATRE ORCHESTRA

(Loader, S. KNEALE KELLEY )
Conducted by LESLIE WOODGATE
GRACE REYNOLDS (Soprano)

Contributors

Unknown: S. Kneale Kelley
Conducted By: Leslie Woodgate

: REGINALD FOORT

At THE ORGAN of THE REGAL, KINGSTON-ON-
THAMES

: 'The Children's Hour'

Songs by DEREK MCCULLOCH
Set to Music by MAYNARD GROVER and Sung by STUART ROBERTSON
'Ruffles becomes Roberto ' (M. H. Fitzgerald )

Contributors

Songs By: Derek McCulloch
Music By: Maynard Grover
Sung By: Stuart Robertson
Unknown: M. H. Fitzgerald

: The First News

Weather Forecast, First General News Bulletin; Bulletin for Farmers

: ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL—II

Mr. T. CREW: The Referee and the Spectator'
THE referee is a man more tolerated as a necessary evil than understood as the vital guardian of the rules and etiquette of the game. Many spectators seem to resent his doing work for which they feel better equipped themselves. For these reasons the position of the man with the whistle will stand explaining, and he could have no better champion than Mr. T. Crew , himself a famous referee, with twelve years' experience of League Football, one Cup Final, and many international matches to his credit. Tonight he will explain how a referee qualifies for his position, tell of some of the knotty points he has had to decide on the spur of the moment, surrounded by twenty-two angry men and a crowd of man-eaters, and indicate how the individual spectator can make the game more enjoyable for himself, and the poor referee.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. T. Crew

: WELSH INTERLUDE

Mr. E. MORGAN HUMPHREYS : ' Welsh
Orators I have heard '
(From West Regional)

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. E. Morgan Humphreys

: THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND

Conductor, B. WALTON O'DONNELL

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell

: Promenade Concert

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL, LONDON
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappcll and Co., Ltd.)
Russian Concert
ODA SLOBODSKAYA
PARRY JONES
SOLOMON
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal First Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by SIR HENRY WOOD
THE scene of Borodin's groat and only opera is
Russia of the tenth century. Vladimir, and his father, Prince Igor, have been taken captive hy the Polovtsi, under the leadership of Khan Kontchak. Standing nt the opening of his tent facing the sunset, Vladimir recalls in an intensity of nostalgia tlio homo from which war and captivity have turn him. Only one thing consoles him, the love that has come to him and Kontchakovna, the daughter of the Khan. As he thinks of her, the music grows more lyrical, and as the twilight gathers and the lovely song draws to an end, Kontchakovna herself appears and steals softly up to Vladimir.
FIREWORKS is one of Stravinsky's very early compositions. He wrote it, while lie was still a pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov's, as a contribution to the wedding festivities of Rimsky-Korsakov's daughter, Sonia. At the wedding there were probably no real fireworks, and it was Stravinsky's idea, literally, to provide a substitute ; therefore, his music does splutter, crackle and sparkle, just like real fireworks do. The middle of the work is a little quieter, and that might easily be. representative of the usual set-piece in a firework display.
THIS symphony has an affinity with Borodin's opera Prince Igor, since it was forming in the composer's mind at much the same time as the opera, when he was obsessed by visions of mediæval Russia and was drawing his inspirations from the period. Borodin was essentially a composer of programme music, and this symphony is said to have a definite programme. Early in the first movement, for example, one can imagine a procession of old Russian princes and their retinues assembling with almost barbaric splendour; again, the slow movement can be said to recall the songs of the Slavonic troubadours; while the Finale clearly illustrates a company of heroic warriors banqueting to the music of stringed instruments and flutes and to a background of the acclamations of the people.

Contributors

Unknown: Parry Jones
Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Unknown: Khan Kontchak.

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE and his ORCHESTRA, from THE
MAY FAIR HOTEL








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel