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: 0 ' NEW PENNIES, OLD PURSES '— XIII

Dr. P. Sargent FLORENCE: A Summing Up *
(Stayed from Birmingham)

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. P. Sargent Florence:

: REGINALD FOORT

At THE ORGAN of THE REGAL, KiINGST-ON-
THAMES

: JACK MARTIN and his HOTEL

MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA
From THE HOTEL MAJESTIC, ST. ANNE'S-ON-SEA

: The Bournemouth Municipal Orchestra

Conductor, SIR DAN GODFREY
MAY MUKLE (Violoncello)
From THE PAVILLION, BOURNEMOUTH
MAY MUKLÉ and Orchestra
Violoncello Concerto .............. d'Albert
E UGEN D'ALBERT, whose death occurred only recently, was really an Englishman, though he lived for most of his mature life in Germany and had a French cavalry officer for grandfather. His father, too, was French, though he emigrated as a boy to England, became ballet-master at Covent Garden Theatre, remove] to Newcastle and to Glasgow-where Eugpn was born-and wrote a quantity of dance music, including the Edinburgh Quadrille.
Eugen studied in London, showed early signs of becoming a brilliant pianist, and as a promising composer gained a Mendelssohn Scholarship for further study abroad. However, either d'Albcrt only took a siugle ticket or lost his return half, for he never came back to England. at least to live, and ended up as Director of the Hochschule in Berlin.
He was considered one of the most, famous pianists of his day. but it is as an opera composei that he is now most regarded. Tieflanel was his most successful opera-so successful that it reached even London and was performed here in one of the Beecham opera seasons. In all, d'Albcrt wrote sixteen operas, many of which achieved extraordinary popularity. , at 4.45

Contributors

Conductor: Sir Dan Godfrey

: NORAH MILNE

At THE ORGAN of THE ASTORIA CINEMA,
CORSTORPHINE
(From Edinburgh)

: The Children's Hour

' An Insult to the Standard' from
'The Talisman'
(Sir Walter Scott )
With suitable Music provided by GENIAL JEMIMA

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Walter Scott
Provided By: Genial Jemima

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST. FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; Bulletin for Farmers at 630

: The Foundations of Music

BEETHOVEN'S PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by DOROTHY MOGGRIDGE
Sonata No. 26 in E Flat (Das Lebewobl)
(The Farewell)
1. Adagio: Allegro (Das Lebewohl ) (Farewell)
2. Andante espressivo (Die Abwesenhoit) (Absence); *3. Vivaccissimamente (Das Wiedersehen) (The Return)
Sonata No. 24 in F Sharp
Adagio cantabile-Allegro ma non troppo ; Allegro vivace
BEETHOVEN was not in the habit of writing works to a programme. especially those in the sonata form, much less did he give names to them except on rare occasions, such as when he appended the title ' Kroica ' to the third symphony. But in regard to the piano sonatas, the fanciful labels ' Moonlight,' ' Appassionata,' ' Pastoral,' and so forth are merely publishers' blurbs and Beethoven would have been the last to countenance them. However, Beethoven did himself give names to two of his pianoforte sonatas. One of them was the early Sonata Pathétique, which he so called because at the impressionable age of twenty-seven he persuaded himself that he was consciously experimenting in the use of pathos as an artistic medium, and he was really pleased with what, in this sonata, he had achieved in the way of introducing pathos. The other was the one being played today. Das Lebe wohl. This work has not only a title, but also a programme—the only one of the sonatas that has-though considered as programme it is altogether lacking in interest and substance. It was written for an occasion-as a musical tribute, in fact, to his patron the Archduke Rudolph , with whose political troubles Beethoven was in sympathy. Rudolph was under orders to leave Vienna, but it was hoped he would quickly return. The whole programme, therefore, is contained in the words departure, exile, and return. It is true some attempt has been made to illustrate the feelings conjured up by these words, but the sonata, as music, is not in the least affected by the pro-grammatical side issue.

Contributors

Played By: Dorothy Moggridge
Unknown: Das Lebewohl
Unknown: Das Lebe
Unknown: Archduke Rudolph

: 'IDLE THOUGHTS OF A BUSY FARMER '—VI

Mr. A. G. STREET : A Lazy Farmer '

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. A. G. Street

: An Organ Recital

By 0. H. PEASGOOD
Relayed from ST. MARK'S, NORTH
AUDLEY STREET

Contributors

Unknown: H. Peasgood

: British Theatre Music

THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Section D)
(Led by LAURANCETURNER)

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: ' ENCOUNTERS '

Captain ROBERT A. L. HARTMAN and Mr. F. H. GRISEWOOD
A SHORT, sharp encounter in a club smoking-room between two members who to the very young would appear middle-aged and to the middle-aged would seem very young. They start with a discussion of habit in love, in marriage, and in work. veer off into a lively exchange on politics, and are still talking when Time ' is called. This provocative exchange of views should start many arguments in homes where there are habits of love, marriage, or work.

Contributors

Unknown: Captain Robert A. L. Hartman
Unknown: Mr. F. H. Grisewood

: The Wireless Military Band

Conducted by CHARLES LEGGETT
HERBERT THORPE (Tenor)
FOSTER RICHARDSON (Bass)

Contributors

Conducted By: Charles Leggett
Tenor: Herbert Thorpe

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND, from
MONSEIGNEUR

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox








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