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Listings

: ' SAVING TIME IX THE KITCHEN'—

VII
Miss HELEN SIMPON : 'Making Tinned
Foods Interesting' .

Contributors

Unknown: Miss Helen Simpon

: REGIXALD FOORT

At THE ORGAN of THE REGAL, KINGSTON-
ON-THAMES

: M03CHETTO and his ORCHESTRA

From THE DORCHESTER HOTEL

: The Children's Hour

' The Showing-up of Larry the Lamb'
(S. G. Hulme-Beaman )
With Incidental Music by THE GERSHOM
PARKINGTON QUINTET

Contributors

Unknown: G. Hulme-Beaman

: 'The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

BEETHOVEN'S PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by DOROTHY MOGGRIDGE
Sonata No. 13 in E Flat
1. Andante; 2. Allegro molto e vivace ; 3. Adagio con espressione; 4. Allegro vivace
Sonata No. 20 in G
1. Allegro ma non troppo; 2. Tempo di Menuetto

Contributors

Played By: Dorothy Moggridge

: Pride and Prejudice

by Jane Austen
Read by Mr. RONALD WATKINS

MR. RONALD WATKINS resumes today from Chapter XVII, and continues on Thursday to the end of Chapter XXI. Last week Elizabeth's conversation with Mr. Wickham had only increased the natural dislike she feels towards the haughty Darcy. Now we follow her to the Netherfield Ball, there to be mortified by the dancing of Mr. Collins, 'awkward and solemn,' by the attentions of the detested Darcy, by the bad singing of her sister Mary, and by the indiscreetly audible reflections of her mother on suitable marriages for her daughters.

Contributors

Read By: Mr. Ronald Watkins
Read By: Mr. Ronald Watkins

: String Orchestral Concert

THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Section E)
(Led by MARIE WILSON )
Conducted by ARTHUR CATTERALL
SINCE (the days of Bach and Handel, composers who have written works to bo played by a number of string instruments alone have done so deliberately, and have been careful to make the fact known in the title of the piece —even Mozart and Haydn did so-but before their day it was scarcely necessary, since orchestras were practically composed only of string players. True, both Bach and Handel frequently added oboes, bassoons, and trumpets, and, less often, several other instruments, but that was done with the idea mainly of adding volume and power to the strings, or of giving an individual character to solos, bpt with no notion of imparting richness and colour to the orchestration -a development in tone painting that had not yet been given its head.
The original corner stone of the string orchestra was the viola. On that instrument, the chief inheritor of the viol and its family, all the stringed instruments in use today are founded, as, indeed, their names imply. Yet, in point of fact, the viola took its place in the orchestra much later than the others, for the early combinations of strings were made up of violins and a bass (which meant the violoncello and its deeper octave) filled in as to the middle harmonies with organ or harpsichord. Gradually, however, the needs of a fuller music demanded a more sensitive machine and the st ring orchestra as we know it was developed and finally established. Yet, as a , consequenceof the absence of any but tho crudest notion of orchestral colour in the minds of composers of the eighteenth century—excluding Mozart, as one invariably docs in any sweeping statement of fact—praetically the whole music of that period is drawn of necessity in black and white, and as there are no tools better adapted to orchestral line and wash than the family of stringed instruments, it is not surprising that in the rich mine of music of the past a vein of eighteenth-century concerted string music of amazing value has been unearthed in recent years.
Sextet, Op. 70 (Souvenir de Florence)
Tchaikovsky
1. Allegro con spirito; 2. Adagio cantabile e con moto ; 3. Allegretto moderato ; 4. Allegro vivace
THE technique of scoring with orchestral colour has developed slowly. A whole century, with Wagner intervening, lies between the achievements of Beethoven and Richard Strauss , and the best part of another between the deathless experiments of Berlioz and Ravel's silken diaphane. And with it all, to this day the string orchestra holds its own. The reason is clear.
The convention that the palette of orchestral tone is roughly divided into three sections—strings, wood wind, and brass— each functioning individually, was born lusty and is dying hard. This convention was practised by the majority of romantic composers of the nineteenth century, and it served them very well. One universally acknowledged axiom, however, governed all their operations, and out of it arose a second axiom of equal value. The first was that by skilfully spreading and spacing chords, colour variety could be achieved and controlled, and the second was that the string section is in this respect the only self-contained one. Moreover, it was quickly discovered that string colour is tho most satisfying and palls least of the three. That accounts for the sustained favour which the string orchestra has enjoyed without a break to modern times. Nearly all the symphonic composers havo made handsome gifts to the repertory of string orchestral music—one of the wealthiest of all the repertories. It would ho impossible to mention all even of the finest of the string orchestral works written during the last hundred years, hut those composers who will come readily to the mind in this connexion include Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Elgar, Dvorak and Crieg.

Contributors

Unknown: Marie Wilson
Conducted By: Arthur Catterall
Conducted By: Richard Strauss

: The Music of Dorothy Howell

DOROTHY HOWELL (Pianoforte)
ELSIE OWElM-Violin)
DOROTHY HOWELL
Humoresque
Study in G Sharp Minor Toccata
-ELSIE OWEN and DOROTHY HOWELL
Andante and Allegro DOROTHY HOWELL
Three Preludes
1. Prelude in C ; 2. Prelude in F Minor ; 3. Prelude in A Flat
ELSIE OWEN
The Moorings Rosalind
(Accompanied by THE COMPOSER)

Contributors

Pianoforte: Dorothy Howell
Unknown: Dorothy Howell
Unknown: Elsie Owen
Unknown: Dorothy Howell
Unknown: Allegro Dorothy Howell
Unknown: Elsie Owen
Unknown: Moorings Rosalind

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN

: 'Bread'

A Play for the Microphone, by L. DU
GARDE PEACH
ANEW Radio play by the author of those notable microphone achievements,
Path of Glory, Love One Another and Ingedient is an event of great interest. Bread treats in satiric-narrative fashion of tho problem of wheat-shortage as it has affected individuals and groups at differont epochs. The action of the play covers three generations, including the ' Hungry Forties ' in England, the early years of the present century in America, and the post-war period of trustification, when the cornering of wheat by the Chicago Pit and other wheat Exchanges was followed by the sensational fall in prices. Starvation in the midst of plenty is the cardinal indictment of modern distributive methods, and Mr. du Garde Peach has handled this world-drama with great power, without sacrificing interest in his individual characters.

: Dance Music

Bertini's Dance Band, from The Tower Ballroom, Blackpool
Time Signal, Greenwich, at 11.30








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