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: SENSE AND SUSTENANCE '—III

Professor S. J. COWELL : ' Eating for Pleasure '

Contributors

Unknown: Professor S. J. Cowell

: REGINALD FOORT

At THE ORGAN of THE REGAL, KINGSTON-ON-
THAMES

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Nature Study
Mr. ERIC PARKER : Round the Country-side—
VI Thunder and Lightning '—II

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Eric Parker

: Music

Sir WALFORD DAVIES : Two Peals of Bells that
Agree ' (2.30 Juniors ; 3.0 Seniors)

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Walford Davies

: French

Monsieur E. M. STÉPHAN and Mademoiselle
COUSTENOBLE: Early Stages in French '—VI

Contributors

Unknown: Monsieur E. M. Stéphan

: 'THE CLAIMS OF SCIENCE '—III

Mr. GERALD HEARD : 'Life-VI, The Control of Life (Genetics)

: THE GROSVENOR HOUSE ORCHESTRA

Directed by JOSEPH MEEUS
From GROSVENOR HOUSE, PARK LANE

Contributors

Directed By: Joseph Meeus

: The Children's Hour

' A Country Holiday '-IV
' Down by the River '
A Dialogue Story by ARTHUR DAVENPORT

Contributors

Story By: Arthur Davenport

: The First News

Weather Forecast, First General News Bulletin; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

SCHUMANN'S SONGS
. Sung by ANNE THURSFIELD (Soprano)
Du bist wie eine Blunie (Thou'rt like a Flower) Schneeglockchen (The Snowdrop) 0 Sonnenschein (0 Sunlight)
Aus don ostlichen Rosen (From the Eastern
Rose)
Zum Schluss (At tho Close)
Jasminenstrauch (The Jasmine Bough) Frühlingsnacht (Spring Kight)

Contributors

Sung By: Anne Thursfield

: FRENCH TALK

Monsieur E. M. STÉPHAN

: The Wireless Military Band

Conducted by CHARLES LEGGETT
RAIE DA COSTA (Pianoforte)
THE Military Band is more accurately a Wind
Band, that is to say, it is composed almost entirely of wind instruments, the violins and other stringed instruments being excluded. The wind band in a primitive form dates from mediaeval times in England, and as a combination has always been popular with the people. The Tudor sovereigns had wind bands of their own for performance on State occasions, but it was not till the seventeenth century that the military band as an integral part of the army was inaugurated by Louis XIV, who entrusted Lully to organize a number of regimental bands. In the early days brass instruments alone were used in army bands, and it was only with the invention of the clarinet that wind bands began the era of popularity they now enjoy And that era is giving place to another, for the old idea that the full concert orchestra appealed to a different and more cultivated class than did the military band is now being discredited by the fact that concerts like that of tonight are not only possible, but increasingly frequent.

Contributors

Conducted By: Charles Leggett

: ' LIFE AMONG NATIVE TRIBES '—II

Dr. AUDREY RICHARDS : ' The Rhodosian Native in his Home'
DR. AUDREY RICHARDS is a woman anthropologist who has studied the natives of the Babemba tribes of North-Eastern Rhodesia from no other motive than to find out exactly how they live. In all parts of the Empire, and in Africa particularly, the root problem of administration is to enable the white man and the black to live side by side in harmony. The contacts of traders and missionaries have both tended to break up the primitive forms and beliefs of the. life of the native without offering him satisfactory substitutes. Where business and religion have failed, science, in the form of anthropology, alone can give answers of enduring value, based on accurate knowledge of the way the native organizes his own life. Dr. Richards's picture of the Rhodesian native in his home is more than an entertaining word-picture of a strange scene ; it is an example of the new and hopeful way imperial problems are yielding to scientific treatment.
, at 9.0

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. Audrey Richards

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: Symphony Concert

LAURI KENNEDY (Violoncello)
THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Section B)
(Leader, ARTHUR CATTERALL )
Conductor, ADRIAN BOULT
THE responsibility for giving a sentimental title
J- to a work of a serious nature is usually traceable to the publisher or to emotional public opinion. In this case, however, Brahms himself gave this overture its name of ' Tragic,' but he did not give any other reason for his choice of title than is contained in the music. It was written at the same time as the Academic Festival Overture, in the summer of 1880, and may be
' considered its complement. Both overtures were first performed at Breslau in the following year, and the performance was somewhat of an occasion, for Brahms had just been made a Doctor of Philosophy by the University of that city.
LAURI KENNEDY and Orchestra
Violoncello Concerto in B Flat
Boccherini, rd. Gürtzmacher
T AURI KENNEDY , who is the first 'cellist of the B.B.C. Orchestra, has been playing violoncello solos in public since he was eight. He made his debut at that ago in Australia, later studied in Vienna and London, and was then advised by Dame Nellie Melba to go to America. There he met John McCormack and joined him on a long series of tours. Besides travelling with McCormack, Kennedy has toured with Melba, Tetrazzini, and many others, and everywhere with great success. He is a soloist of the first order one of many such in the B.B.C. Orchestra.

Contributors

Leader: Arthur Catterall
Conductor: Adrian Boult
Unknown: Lauri Kennedy
Unknown: Auri Kennedy
Unknown: Dame Nellie Melba
Unknown: John McCormacK

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE'S BLUE LYRES from the DORCHESTER
HOTEL








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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