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Listings

: ' 'NEW PENNIES, OLD PURSES'—IV

' The Family Bills on £3 a Week '—III

: QUENTIN MACLEAN

At THE ORGAN of THE TROCADERO
CINEMA, ELEPHANT AND CASTLE

: JACK MARTIN and his HOTEL MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA

From THE HOTEL MAJESTIC, ST. ANNE'S-ON-SEA
(From North Regional)

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

RECEPTION TEST
2.30 Biology and Hygiene
Professor WINIFRED CULLIS , C'.B.E. : ' Your Body every Day-V, How we seo '
2.55 Interval
3.0 English Literature
Miss N. KIEMEYER : Delight in Poetry-V.
Ben Battle , by Hood, and The Jackdaw of Rheims, by R. H. Barham

Contributors

Unknown: Professor Winifred Cullis
Unknown: Ben Battle
Unknown: R. H. Barham

: A Brass Band Concert

(From North Regional)
THE PEXKETH TANNERY BAND
Conducted by J. A. GREENWOOD

Contributors

Conducted By: J. A. Greenwood

: REGINALD NEW

At THE ORGAN OF THE BEAUFORT CINEMA
From WASHWOOD HEATH, BIRMINGHAM

: The Children's Hour

' THE KNIGHT'S VISION '
From ' The Talisman'
(Sir Walter Scott )
Incidental Music provided by GENIAL JEMIMA

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Walter Scott

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST. FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

MOZART'S PIANOFORTE VARIATIONS
Played by MAURICE COLE
Twelve Variations on the Air, Ah! vous dirais-je, Maman ?
Kino Variations on the Minuet of Mr.
Duport

Contributors

Played By: Maurice Cole

: ' THE CINEMA'

Mr. CEDRIC BELFRAGE

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Cedric Belfrage

: TALK ON FARMING

Sir DANIEL HALL , K.C.B., F.R.S., Chief Scientific Adviser, Ministry of Agriculture

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Daniel Hall

: ' SPEECH IN THE MODERN WORLD '—I

Mr. A. LLOYD JAMES : 'What Speech really is '
DESPITE the fact that speech is the most familiar of all human experiences, the vehicle of human knowledge and the dividing line between man and beast, little is known about it because it is always taken for granted. In these days of mechanical reproduction and transmission of the voice by microphone, telephone, gramophone and talking film speech plays an increasingly important part in our lives. Mr. A. Lloyd James in this new series attacks some of the more obvious aspects of this universal problem.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. A. Lloyd James
Unknown: Mr. A. Lloyd James

: An Orchestral Concert

THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Section D)
(Led by LAURANCE TURNER )
Conducted by T. H. MORRISON
WHEN Liszt was in Paris in his early twenties, he beard Victor Hugo read his own poem ' Ce qu'on entend sur la Montagne,' and it so impressed him that the idea of rendering the subject of it in terms of music remained with him for years. He finally carried out his plan when he was in Weimar, and comparatively settled. Here he wrote his famous twelve symphonic poems, Victor Hugo 's verses suggesting the first of them, and in so doing set his stamp very forcibly ou the development of nearly all modern music. Scarcely a composer of all those, great and small, who followed after him but has composed works in the symphonic poem form. Of these, the examples with which Richard Strauss has enriched the orchestral repertory are among the finest and most successful. The methods of Strauss, however, differ from those of Liszt in an important respect. Strauss worked to a programme, practically to a scenario, and the literary incidents of his subject arc reproduced more or less faithfully and in the same order in his music. This was not Liszt, the inventor's method, which has been well described by Ernest Newman : ' Instead of trying to tell us ui music precisely what the poet has told )is in verse, Liszt re-thinks in. music what the poet has already said, and gives it out to us as something born of musical feeling itself.' For example, the subject of Les Préludes is taken from Lamartine's Méditations Poétiques, and is a commentary on life as a. series of preludes to the unknown song of which death is the 6rst dread note.

Contributors

Unknown: Laurance Turner
Conducted By: T. H. Morrison
Unknown: When Liszt
Unknown: Victor Hugo
Unknown: Victor Hugo
Unknown: Richard Strauss
Unknown: Ernest Newman

: The Second News

Weather Forecast, Second General News Bulletin

: ' A Hundred Years Old'

By SERAFIN and JOAQUIN ALVAREZ
QUINTERO
English Version by HELEN and HARLBY
GRANVILLE BARKER
Adapted for Broadcasting by DuLCiMA GLASBY
Produced by HOWARD ROSE

Contributors

Unknown: Joaquin Alvarez
Unknown: Granville Barker
Broadcasting By: Dulcima Glasby
Produced By: Howard Rose

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND, from MONSEIGNBUR
(And perhaps the Song of the Nightingale)

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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