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Listings

: 'THE WEEK IN WESTMINSTER '

Miss M. GRAVES , M.P.

Contributors

Unknown: Miss M. Graves

: Organ Recital

by ALLAN BIGGS
From ALL SAINTS', MARGARET STREET

Contributors

Unknown: Allan Biggs

: A RECITAL OF GRAMOPHONE RECORDS

By CHRISTOPHER STONE

Contributors

Unknown: Christopher Stone

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

RECEPTION TEST
2.30 Rural Science
Sir JOHN RUSSELL , F.R.S. : ' The Conquest of the Soil-III, Cultivation'
2.55 Interval

Contributors

Unknown: Sir John Russell

: ' LIFE AND WORK IN THE BRITISH ISLES '-VI

Mr. GEORGE FLETCHER : ' Ireland— The Dairy
Farmer'

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. George Fletcher

: FRIDAY AFTERNOON STORY

Mr. FRANK RoscoE

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Frank Roscoe

: Moschetto and his Orchestra

From The Dorchester Hotel

: The Children's Hour

The Falcons of Ser Frederigo (Longfellow) (Part 1)
Songs at the Piano by HELEN HEN-
SCHEL
At approximately 5.35 p.m., ' Here and There,' a Summary of the Week's
News, by STEPHEN KING-HALL

Contributors

Unknown: Stephen King-Hall

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

ENGLISH SONGS from the TweJfth to the Twentieth Century
Sung by JOHN MOREL
Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Vaughan Williams (1872), Whither must
I wander ?
Gustav Hoist (1874), Betelogeuso John Ireland (1879), Vain Desire Arnold Bax (1883), At the last
Eugene Goossens (1893), I hear an Army
Peter Warlock (1894-1931 ),Late Summer Alec Rowley (1892), The Bird
IN the last group there is time for only a small number of the many line songs of our present era, and those few can only serve to indicate certain individual trends and tendencies of some of our foremost composers, whose influence on the development of song is above question. It is safe to say that amongst the mass of material published each year there are the few songs which betoken the certain fact that we are fortunately in full tide of progression again along our long line of English song.

Contributors

Sung By: John Morel
Unknown: Vaughan Williams
Unknown: Arnold Bax
Unknown: Eugene Goossens
Unknown: Alec Rowley

: ' THE WEEK-END IN THE GARDEN '— VIII

Mr. A. N. RAWES : 'The Fruit Trees '

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. A. N. Rawes

: 'MODERN LIFE AND MODERN LEISURE '—VIII

Dr. C. DELISLE BURNS , D .Litt. (Stevenson Lecturer in Citizenship in the University of Clasgow) : Boys and Girls of Today '
(Front Glasgow)

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. C. Delisle Burns
Unknown: D .Litt.

: ' THE FORSAKEN CITY'

' London is a Desert Growne '
Being a picture in sound of the Great
Plague of 1665 Compiled by M. H. ALLEN from the works of Defoe, Pepys, Nash, liarrison Ainsworth, and contemporary anonymous authors
Wi th the following : EDMUND WILLARD
CARLETON HOBBS
DENNIS ARUNDELL
ROBERT DONAT
V. C. CLINTON BADDELEY
Produced by PETER CRESWELL

Contributors

Unknown: M. H. Allen
Unknown: Edmund Willard
Unknown: Carleton Hobbs
Unknown: Dennis Arundell
Unknown: Robert Donat
Produced By: Peter Creswell

: ' WAYS AND MEANS'

(a frivolous affair with a little music)
By PETER CRESWELL
Songs set by ToNY LOWRY and DOUGLAS BROWNSMITH
Characters :
Peggy, a young woman who knows her own mind ... VIVIEN LAMBELET
Gemmett, was once her nurse and is now her maid ... ETHEL LODGE
Tony, who lives in (and on) hope ... PETER
HADDON
Produced by PETER CRESWELL

Contributors

Music By: Peter Creswell
Unknown: Tony Lowry
Unknown: Douglas Brownsmith
Unknown: Vivien Lambelet
Unknown: Ethel Lodge
Produced By: Peter Creswell

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN

: Mendelssohn Programme

JAN VAN DER GUCHT (Tenor)
MARY HAMLIN (Soprano)
ROSALIND ROWSELL (Soprano)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
THE B.B.C. ORCHESTRA
(Section D)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
Symphony No. 4 in A (The Italian)
Allegro vivace ; Andante ; Con moto moderato ; SaltareUo
IN his letters from Italy Mendelssohn referred more than once to this Symphony, which ho felt sure was to be among the brightest and most joyous of all his music.
The first movement is certainly full of exhilaration and the first main tune is heard at the outset with real animation ; the second theme, appearing after some development of the first, is no less buoyant
For some reason which no one knows, the second movement is always called ' The Pilgrims' March.' -.The first part. of the movement is certainly serene and almost grave as compared with the vivacity of the other three, and the introductory bars have been spoken of as ' a call to prayer.' In the second part of the movement clarinets have a fine theme and the movement ends with a return to the first subject.
The customary Scherzo movement is here rather liko a Minuet, in moderate time, with a gracious tune played by tho strings. In the middle (' Trio ') section there is a strong phrase played by horns and bassoons, to which violins, and afterwards flutes, reply.
The last movement is in Tarantelle rhythm. hurrying along at strenuous speed. There are three themes, all played by the strings, all in the same Saltarello measure, and though, towards the end, there is a. more meditative tune played by woodwinds, it is the energy and good spirits of the dance rhythm which mainly prevail. CHORUS
Part Songs:
On the Sea
Early Spring Departure Hunting Song
ORCHESTRA
Nocturne and Scherzo (A Midsummer
Night's Dream)
JAN VAN DER GUCHT, MARY HAMLIN ,
ROSALIND ROWSELL , Chorus and Orchestra
Psalm 95; Come, let us sing
Y 1838, his thirtieth year, Mendelssohn was in constant demand both at home and abroad. His regular task was conducting the Gowandhaus Concerts in Leipzig, playing pianoforte, too, when occasion demanded, and under his guidance the standard of performance was. steadily reaching a higher pitch of excellence than over. He conducted the Lower Rhine Festival that year, and made the occasion memorable by insisting on the inclusion of a Bach Cantata, practically unknown then to Bach's fellowcountrymon. It was in 1838, also, that his eldest son was bom, and that he presented his young wife (they had been married only a year) to his own family in Berlin. The amazing thing is that ho had any time for composition at all, and yet that spring and summer he produced much fine music, of which this psalm is only one example. It has always been a favourite piece of his sacred music, and at least two parts of it—For His is the Sea and 0 come, let us worship—are often sung separately.

Contributors

Soprano: Mary Hamlin
Soprano: Rosalind Rowsell
Conducted By: Stanford Robinson
Unknown: Mary Hamlin
Unknown: Rosalind Rowsell

: DANCE MUSIC

THE SAVOY HOTEL ORPHEANS, from THE
SAVOY HOTEL








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