• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: REGINALD FOORT

At THE ORGAN of THE REGAL, MARBLE ARCH

: THE NORTHERN STUDIO ORCHESTRA

Directed by JOHN BRIDGE
(From North Regional)

Contributors

Directed By: John Bridge

: A Sonata Recital

OTTOLINE FORSHAW (Violin)
WINIFRED BURY (Pianoforte)
One of the foremost violinists of Franco in the first part of the eighteenth century, who had a big influence on his own and following generations by grafting something of Italian grace and dignity on the French manner, Jean Baptiste Senaille was a real Parisian. His father was one of the famous 'twenty-four violins of the King,' and after winning successes and distinction in Italy, where he outshone the native artists on their own ground, he settled in his native city as a member of Louis XV's band.
ALFRED MOFFAT, whose name appears often on programmes as arranger of old music, has done a good deal more than the word 'arranged' at all adequately describes. It is not too much to say that he has re-discovered a whole school of mediaeval music which, until he unearthed it, had been neglected, and practically lost, for generations.

Contributors

Violin: Ottoline Forshaw
Pianoforte: Winifred Bury
Arranger: Alfred Moffat

: EVENSONG

From WESTMINSTER ABBEY

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox

: THE GROSVENOR HOUSE ORCHESTRA

Directed by JOSEPH MEEUS
From GROSVENOR HOUSE, PARK LANE

Contributors

Directed By: Joseph Meeus

: The Children's Hour

Xylophone and Vibraphone Solos by RUDY
STARITA
The Story of Good Resolutions and Sam (
Arthur Davenport )

Contributors

Unknown: Arthur Davenport

: 'The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchango Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

STRAUSS SONGS
Sung by LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto) and JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)

Contributors

Sung By: Linda Seymour
Tenor: John Armstrong

: THE WEEKLY BULLETIN OF SPECIAL NOTICES

TN this period, each Thursday, there will be broadcast the various notices of general application which, though not strictly news of the day, have hitherto been included in the General News Bulletin.
Tho B.B.C. does not broadcast private notices or publicity for matters not of national importance, but an exception has for some time past been made in favour of the Annual Reunions of the larger Service units, particularly in cases where old comrades cannot otherwise be communicated with owing to the absence of addresses. These Reunion, notices will now bo given in this period, together with the various general notices connected with Government and other Public Services, such as Postal Arrangements. Civil Service examinations, and Regulations which are of concern to the general public.
Postal, Traffic, and other similar notices of purely local application will continue to bo included in the various Regional and Local News Bulletins.

: 'Does Industry give Science a Chance ? '

A D:scuss;on between Professor AnNor.n PLANT (Sir Ernest Cassel Professor of Commerce, University of London) and Professor H. Levy (Professor of Mathematics, Imperial College of Science and Technology)

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Ernest Cassel
Unknown: H. Levy

: An Orchestral Concert

VICTOR HELY-HUTCHINSON (Pianoforte)
THE B.B.C. LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
(First Performance)
' THE crags of mastery over musical instruments,' of which
Kenneth Grahanie writes so feelingly in The Golden Age, are no longer so steep as once they were. Climbers, young climbers especially, owe much to Alec Rowley for the greater ease with which the peaks of mastery may now bo reached : he has devoted a big share of his enthusiasm to writing pianoforte music which is tuneful and easy to enjoy, and at the same time well laid out to guide tho steps of youth safely and as easily as may be up the long ascent to Parnassus. A distinguished pianist and organist himself, ho is, too, a composer of charm and originality, as no B.B.C. listener can need to be reminded who heard the broadcasts of his Fantasy, The Princess who lost a Tune. Country Idylls, and other fresh and breezy orchestral music, as well as many shorter pieces and songs, have borne their share, too, in making him the popular composer he is-popular without ever lowering his own high standard of what music ought to be. Down Channel is a new work which is having its first performance this evening ; it is one for which there need be no hesitation in prophesying a happy career in broadcast and other programmes.
VICTOR HELY-HUTCHINSON is already well known to listeners in the threefold capacity of pianist, composer, and conductor. Several of his own pieces have already boen heard in broadcast programmes, and he is steadily winning an ever surer place for himself among the most gifted young British musicians. He was quite a small boy, not yet nine years old, when his musical studies began in earnest, under the guidance of Donald Francis Tovey , one of the most enlightened and inspiring of teachers. Eton, Oxford (he was Lewis Nettleship Memorial Scholar at Balliol), and the Royal College of Music (Adrian Boult and Gustav Hoist), all had a hand in making him the thoroughly sound craftsman he is, though without shackling his own sturdy originality. He nearly became a South African after his student days; from 1922 till 1925 he was on the staff of the South African College of Music'in Cape Town. The Old Country brought him back, how-over, and since then he has lived in London. This piece, composed in 1929, has for sub-titlo Cum grano salis' (With a grain of salt), and the composer tells us that it ' is an attempt to reflect the spirit of today in music. Its general character may be deduced from the sub-title, and the idiom is to some extent reminiscent of the most conservative type of modern music — jazz. Tho work is scored for pianoforte and orchestra, and is written in a kind of looso Rondo form.'
ORCHESTRA
Slav Dance .................... Chabrier
Overture, A calm Sea and a prosperous -
Voyage .................... Mendelssohn
, at 9.0

Contributors

Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Unknown: Kenneth Grahanie
Unknown: Alec Rowley
Unknown: Victor Hely-Hutchinson
Unknown: Donald Francis Tovey
Music: Adrian Boult

: 'The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN

: Vaudeville

LULI VON HOHENBERG
A Selection of Light Ballads
DORIS GILMORE and CHARLES BUCK
MASTER in ' Economy,' by DORIS GILMORE and WALTER FITZGERALD
IRIS ASHLEY
Light Songs, with WILLIAM WALKER at the Piano
'HUR! HUR!'
A Film Fan's Delirium, by FRANK WELLS
With a cast of seven thousand; during the course of which five horses will be killed within full view of the audience.
JACK PAYNE and his B.B.C. DANCE
ORCHESTRA

Contributors

Unknown: Doris Gilmore
Unknown: Charles Buck
Unknown: Doris Gilmore
Unknown: Walter Fitzgerald
Unknown: William Walker
Unknown: Frank Wells
Unknown: Jack Payne

: JACK PAYNE

and his
B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: Account Rendered

January 1st - December 31st, 1931
An impression of some of the Year's events as reflected in the National Programmes of the British Broadcasting Corporation
(Some of these events have been recorded by the Blattnerphone-Stille System, and are being reproduced in the programme by this means)

: Epilogue

Westminster Abbey
Midnight-Big Ben

: JACK PAYNE

and his
B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: Grand Good Night

The inventor and broadcaster of this popular feature of the New Year's Eve programmes writes: 'The Grand Good Night is an institution of some seven years' standing-ancient, therefore, as broadcasting goes. This year it will be spoken in the very tiny hours after midnight on December 31, and will be,as in the past few years, a Grand New Year, or a welcome into 1932. It has grown from small beginnings. In the old, heroic days of 1924 and 1925, I used sometimes to volunteer to do the announcing on Sunday nights in order to give the regular announcers a rest. Then I remember that, taking the cue from Arthur Burrows , one used to slip in a verse or two of poetry at the end of the Sunday programme. Then one night, listening rather inattentively to a long orchestral piece, I began to scribble greetings to various classes of mankind on the back of an old envelope. Out of this grew on the one hand the first Grand Good Night, and on the other hand the Epilogue and Mr. Appleton's Silent Fellowship.
' The first real Grand Good Night was given at Christmas in 1926; by "real," I mean the first fully prepared one which attempted to gather all sorts and conditions of listeners in one great inclusive greeting. It happens that I have a considerable acquaintance with the various trades and industries of the country, and the various occupations contained in them. For example, I could give a fair account of the work of a puddler, or of the chainmaker of Cradley Heath. But every year it seemed that almost as many classes of mankind were forgotten as those who wore remembered. The B.B.C. received some delightful letters from people who had been remembered contrary to their expectation, but also some very grave reproaches from people who had been forgotten.
We simply cannot mention all the trades and occupations of mankind, and this year we are not going to try to do so. We shall mention some as typical, and then give an all embracing greeting to the families of listeners who may still be awake.
'The polyglot greetings with which the Grand Now Year closes will also be cut down a little, not that we do not wish to greet everyone if possible in his own tongue, but there are limits. This year I mean to stick to German and French, and to throw in for fun a little Esperanto for all the rest of the world, including the Japanese.

Contributors

Unknown: Arthur Burrows
Unknown: Cradley Heath.








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel