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Listings

: EDWARD O'HENRY

At THE ORGAN of TUSSAUD's CINEMA

: THE TROCADERO ORCHESTRA

Directed by ALFRED VAN DAM
From THE TROCADERO CINEMA, ELEPHANT AND
CASTLE

Contributors

Directed By: Alfred Van

: The Children's Hour

Professor Wuuklo demonstrates a Dragon

: 'The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL News
BULLETIN: London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

STRAUSS SONGS
Sung by LINDA SEYMOUR (Colltralto) and JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)

Contributors

Sung By: Linda Seymour
Tenor: John Armstrong

: Mr. H.S. Ede: What we look for in French Painting

The practice adopted in previous years, of giving talks introductory to the great Burlington House exhibitions of foreign art, has been continued this year. Last week Mr. Roger Fry described, from a critical point of view, the particular characteristics of French painting, and Mr. Wilenski gave an account of the art in relation to the lives of some of the painters. To-night, Mr. H.S. Ede gives some idea of the particular qualities to be looked for when you visit the exhibition at Burlington House. This talk will be particularly valuable, for although art is international in most respects, there is a peculiar character in the art of each nation. French art, for. example, is extremely different from Persian, Italian, Dutch or Flemish art, which have formed the subjects of the last four exhibitions. Mr. Ede, who is Assistant at the Tate Gallery, broadcast recently in the 'Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise' series on 'A Room to Live in.'

Contributors

Speaker: H.S. Ede

: An Organ Recital

by JOHN CONNELL
(Directer of Music, City of Johannesburg)
Relayed from ST. MARGARET'S, WESTMINSTER
JOHN CONNELL , one of the British musicians on whom South Africa has laid compelling hands, organist of the Town Hall, Johannesburg, for a good many years, is visiting the home country for the second time, in the course of an autumn tour which has taken him as far afield as the United States. On how many organs he has played in the course of such an extended journey it would be rash to guess. But one thing can be confidently said, that no two of them are alike. That is one of the handicaps under which an organist labours, one with which his colleagues of lesser instruments cannot fully sympathize. They, even the pianist, if he is wealthy enough, or backed by a kindly enough firm of pianoforte makers, may take their own accustomed instruments with them, and find them change only as climate and the capricious temper from which musical instruments suffer, make them do. But the organist has to adapt himself, and often with the scantiest opportunities for doing that, to much more serious differences, wherever he goes, in the actual lay-out and arrangement of his complicated instrument : never will ho find stops and other contrivances ready to his hand in quite the same way as they were on the organ on which he last played, nor do any two instruments answer his fingers and his feet with a like responsiveness. That organists overcome that big handicap with such apparent ease is an achievement which the players of humbler instruments salute wholeheartedly-when they remember it.

Contributors

Unknown: John Connell
Unknown: John Connell

: ' Eric: or, Little by Little'

A Tale of Roslyn School
By DEAN FARRAR
Adapted for broadcasting by M. H. ALLEN
Presented by E. J. KING BULL
The Play produced by PETER CRESWELL
FREDERICK WILLIAM FARRAR was born in 1831. He was educated at King William's College, Castletown, Isle of Man, a school whose external surroundings are reproduced in ' 'Eric: or, Little by Little ' ; then at King's College, London, and at Trinity College, Cambridge. He became a schoolmaster, first at Marlborough, then at Harrow : then returned to Marlborough as headmaster in 1871. In the next year he became Chaplain-in-Ordinary to the Queen, and later, Canon of Westminster and Rector of St. Margaret's, Westminster. ' Eric : or, Little by Little ' was his first book, and was published in 1858. The opening sentence of the preface which he wrote for it, thirty-one years later, is quoted at the bottom of the page. He goes on to say: I am deeply thankful to know-from testimony public and private, anonymous and acknowledged-that this object has ... been fulfilled.... I trust that the book may continue to live so long-and so long only-as it may prove to be a source of moral benefit to those who read it.' It continues to live, and to be despatched, with coloured plates and decorated cover, each Christmas, by pious aunts to their nephews : but is the author's modest hope fulfilled ? It is difficult to believe. Nothing ' dates ' so rapidly as a school story, and every year the emotions and sufferings of Eric and his friends, wicked or pure, raise a larger laugh from young and old alike. Fascinated by these drink-sodden, smoke-pickled, gambling school-boys, we cannot pay attention to the moral.

Contributors

Broadcasting By: M. H. Allen
Presented By: E. J. King
Produced By: Peter Creswell
Unknown: Frederick William Farrar

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: Songs from the Shows

No. 5—Old Favourites Presented by JOHN WATT
THE B.B.C. THEATRE ORCHESTRA
Conductor, LESLIE WOODGATE

Contributors

Presented By: John Watt
Conductor: Leslie Woodgate

: DANCE MUSIC

AMBROSE'S BLUE LYRES, from THE DORCHESTER
HOTEL








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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