• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: A Light Classical Concert

JOAN VINCENT (Soprano)
THE VERA PARKER CROOK TRIO

Contributors

Soprano: Joan Vincent

: THE COMMODORE GRAND ORCHESTRA

Directed by JOSEPH MUSCANT
From THE COMMODORE THEATRE, HAMMERSMITH

Contributors

Directed By: Joseph Muscant

: MOSCHETTO and his ORCHESTRA

From THE DORCHESTER HOTEL

: The Children's Hour

(From Midland Regional)
' The Whispering of the Years, a Yuletide
Fantasy,' by NORMAN Timmis.
Prologue, 1931
Christmas, 1867 Christmas, 1890
The Wartime Christmas, 1916 The Wireless Christmas, 1931

Contributors

Unknown: Norman Timmis.

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

STRAUSS SONGS
Sung by LINDA SEYMOUR (Contralto) and JOHN ARMSTRONG (Tenor)
THOUGH Richard Strauss is best known to the general public by his Symphonic Poems and Operas, he has written also a very great number of songs, which some people count among his greatest achievements.
Many of them were introduced to the British public, as some whose memories go back far enough may recall, in the programmes of the Strauss Festival, given in London, at the old St. James' Hall in 1903. when they were sung with great charm by the composer's wife, at that time a well-known operatic singer, Pauline De Ahna.
In style and character, Strauss' songs cover a wide range. Some are deeply felt and expressive, such as Traum durch die Dammerung (the most famous of them all), Ruhe meine Seele, and many more of the highest beauty. Others are passionate and brilliant, electrifying in their ardour and glow, such as Heimliche Aufforderung and Caeilie. Yet others, of which the Steinklopfers Lied is a typical example, deal with the less pleasant aspect of life in a manner appropriately grim and harsh ; while others again, such as the lovely Morgen and the delicious Muttertäudeleiare idyllic in their simplicity and charm.
Strauss has himself explained, in a highly interesting letter, his methods of composition. ' For some time,' lie wrote, ' I will have no impulso to compose at all. Then oneovening I will be turning the leaves of a volume of poetry and a poem will strike my eye. I read it through ; it agrees with the mood I am in ; and at once the appropriate music is fitted to it. I am in a musical frame of mind, and all I want is the right poetic vessel into which to pour my ideas. If good luck throws this in my way, a satisfactory song results.' But if, he added, the poem was not the right one, or he was not in the mood, then things worked out very differently and, hard as he might try, the result was never satisfactory.
But this is, of course, the way with all composers. It is only a pity that a larger proportion of Strauss' finest songs are not more regularly sung in England, where the tendency is to ring the changes perpetually on only a few of the best known; listeners will be glad to make acquaintance with some of the less familiar songs which Linda, Seymour and John Armstrong are introducing as the Foundations of Music this week.

Contributors

Sung By: Linda Seymour
Tenor: John Armstrong
Unknown: Richard Strauss
Singer: Pauline De Ahna.
Singer: John Armstrong

: ' NEW BOOKS '

Miss V. SACKVILLE-WEST

: Vaudeville

THE HULBERT BROTHERS
JACK HULBERT and CLAUDE HULBERT
MARIO DE PIETRO
Mandolin and Banjo Solos
WINNIE MELVILLE and DEREK OLDHAM
The Popular Musical Comedy Stars
LAWRENCE BROUGH and OLGA ESME
' Choosing an Instrument'
ARTHUR PRINCE and 'JIM'
THE ORCHESTRA, under the direction of S. KNEALE KELLEY , will play during the programme

Contributors

Unknown: Hulbert Brothers
Unknown: Jack Hulbert
Unknown: Claude Hulbert
Unknown: Mario de Pietro
Unknown: Derek Oldham
Unknown: Olga Esme
Unknown: S. Kneale Kelley

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND
GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: Chamber Music

TATIANA MAKUSHINA (Soprano)
THE KUTCHER STRING QUARTET:
SAMUEL KUTCHER ( Violin), FREDERICK GRINKE (Violin), RAYMOND JEREMY (Viola), DOUGLAS CAM-
ERON (Violoncello)
IT is not easy to describe in words, as a listener recently asked the B.B.C. to do, what is
. meant by 'Romantic' music. To anyone who listens attentively, Schumann's music itself answers the question much better than words could do, and nowhere more convincingly than in the string quartets. They are full, even fuller than most of Schumann's music, of those poetic qualities for which no better term could easily be found than Romantic,' and they had a good deal to do with enhancing his reputation when they appeared in 1842, as practically his first essay in writing chamber music. They were clearly composed under genuine impulse; all three were written within a month, and the last two movements of the third occupied Schumann only one day each. They are dedicated to Mendelssohn, and the Leipzig world of music took them up with enthusiasm.
DEBUSSY'S one String Quartet is an early work, and is almost the only chamber music ho wrote until his last years. While he was writing the quartet he was already busy with the opera Pelleas and Melisande, though it was not completed until long afterwards ; it was at that period, too, that his enthusiasm for the poet Mallarme, who inspired The Faun's After. noon, had a big share in developing the turn of mind which his music reflects so very much better than any words could describe. The quartet is pervaded throughout by that vague and shadowy atmosphere of beauty which Debussy knew better than anyone else how to achieve in mere tones. He himself once declared that in it he had said all he had to say in that form, but there are many of his admirers who feel quite sure that if he had given us others, or even one other, in his later years, it might have been even richer in those qualities of poetic beauty of which he was master. There are four movements, which all follow the classical models more faithfully than on a first hearing they seem to do. The use of the whole tone scale, and an inclination towards old church modes, are the two chief features which were novel when the quartet first appeared, though everybody knows how familiar Debussy afterwards made them.

Contributors

Violin: Samuel Kutcher
Violin: Frederick Grinke
Violin: Raymond Jeremy

: DANCE MUSIC

HENRY HALL'S GLENEAGLES HOTEL BAND, from THE ADELPHI HOTEL,
LIVERPOOL








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel