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Listings

: A Concert

VICTORIA MAITLAND (Contralto)
HECTOR HALL (Tenor)
DOROTHY TRESEDER (Pianoforte)

: Organ Recital

by WALTER VALE
From ALL SAINTS', MARGARET STREET

: A RECITAL OF GRAMOPHONE RECORDS

By CHRISTOPHER STONE

Contributors

Unknown: Christopher Stone

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

RECEPTION TEST
2.30 Rural Science
Sir JOHN RUSSELL , F.R.S. : 'How Science came into Farming-VI, Germs and Plants'
2.55 Interval

Contributors

Unknown: Sir John Russell

: ' Life and Work in the British Isles '—XII

Mr. HAMLET ROBERTS : Snowdon Slates '

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Hamlet Roberts

: FRIDAY AFTERNOON STORY

Mr. FRANK RoscoE

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Frank Roscoe

: DRAMATIC READING

Scenes from
' The Christmas Carol'
(Charles Dickens ) :

Contributors

Unknown: Charles Dickens

: FOR,SCHOOLS

Specially selected Gramophone Records

: MOSCHETTO and his ORCHESTRA

From THE DORCHESTER HOTEL

: The Children's Hour

Songs and Imitations by RONALD GOURLEY
The Second Adventure of ' Chatterer the Rod
Squirrel' (Thornton Burgess )
At 5.35 p.m., approximately, a Summary of tho
Week's News, by STEPHEN KING-HALL

Contributors

Unknown: Ronald Gourley
Unknown: Thornton Burgess
Unknown: Stephen King-Hall

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report, and Bulletin for Farmers

: WELSH INTERLUDE

(From Cardiff)
Professor IFOR WILLIAMS
Welsh Place Names
WELSH place names can throw a good deal of light on the history of the country. Somu of them are really the names of Celtic or pre-Celtic tribes, who once lived in the regions now called after them. Occasionally, a place name is the only available testimony to the presence of a certain tribe in a particular district. Professor Williams will give some examples of such place names and show their connection with thejpast. He will also discuss old Welsh words which have disappeared from modern literature, but which survive here and there as place names.

: Mr. ERNEST NEWMAN

THE B.B.C. MUSIC CRITIC

: ' Learning to Live '-XI

Professor JOHN MACMURRAY (Grote Professor of the Philosophy of Mind and Logic, University of London) : 'Is a Democratic Culture possible ? '
WE are now awake to the difficulties of meeting tho two great modern demands which are made upon education. But wo must remember that, even if those difficulties are satisfactorily surmounted, education has not yet begun to perform its most important function—its only true function—which is to train free men to live freely. We have, therefore, to turn in the last two talks to the question of culture, and of education for culture. Two main problems face us. Can culture bo democratic, and, if so, what kind of culture must it bo ? We shall find that the question is bound up with the quantity and quality of leisure that our industrial democracy can provide, and with the kind of use that can be made of it. for living a truly human life. The second problem is the subject of the last talk. next Friday.

Contributors

Unknown: Professor John MacMurray

: 'Carmen'

(Bizet)
Performed by THE COVENT GARDEN OPERA
COMPANY
Relayed from
THE PRINCE OF WALES THEATRE,
BERMINGHAM
Act II: the Inn of Lillas Pastia
Cast in order of appearance :
Conductor, ROBERT AINSWORTH
THE inn is on the outskirts of Seville, a haunt of the smugglers to whose band
Carmen belongs. It isevening. and revelry is the mood of all there—soldiers, gipsies, and townsfolk. Soon they are joined by Escamillo, bull fighter and idol of Seville; they toast him, and in response ho sings his Toreador song. He and Carmen are obviously fascinated by one another. The inn is closed for the night, but Carmen still expects Jose, the handsome soldier whom she had beguiled into freeing her a month before ; she was under arrest in his charge, for having stabbed a follow cigarette maker. His voice is heard, and she admits him, dancing for him as she had promised she would do if he came to seek her there. Tiumpettones, blending with the music of her dance, sound his recall to barracks, and Carmen taunts him with his devotion to duty rather than to her. His reply is the Flower Song. Taking from his breast the bloom which once she threw him, he tells her how he languished in prison for her sake—his punishment for letting her escape— dreaming always of her witchery. A knocking on the gate breaks in on the end of his song, and his officer enters ; he, too, is enslaved by Carmen's charm. He orders Jose off, and in a moment of mad jealousy the soldier draws his sword ; the clash of weapons brings tho smugglers in a rush, to disarm and make captives of them both, officer and trooper.

Contributors

Conductor: Robert Ainsworth
Carmen: Enid Cruickshank
Frasquita: Doris Lemon
Mercedes: Frances Frost
Zuniga: Philip Bertram
Escamillo: Arthur Fear
Dancairo: William Michael
Remendado: Roy Devereux
Don José: Francis Russell

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: THE WAY OF THE WORLD '

Mr. VERNON BARTLETT

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Vernon Bartlett

: Shakespeare's Tragedy of 'Julius Caesar'

Adapted for Broadcasting by BARBARA
BURNHAM
The Incidental Music by ROBERT CHIGNELL
Played by THE B.B.C. THEATRE ORCHESTRA
Conducted by LESLIE WOODGATE
Lucius' Song composed by H. M. CECIL Sung by LESLEY DUDLEY , with harp accompaniment by SIDONIE GOOSSENS
The Play produced by PETER CRESWELL

Contributors

Music By: Robert Chignell
Conducted By: Leslie Woodgate
Composed By: H. M. Cecil
Sung By: Lesley Dudley
Unknown: Sidonie Goossens
Produced By: Peter Creswell

: DANCE MUSIC

THE SAVOY HOTEL ORPHEANS, from THE
SAVOY HOTEL








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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