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: An Orchestral Concert

(From North Regional)
THE NORTHERN STUDIO ORCHESTRA
Directed by JOHN BRIDGE
MEIRION MORRIS (Bass-Baritone)

Contributors

Directed By: John Bridge
Bass-Baritone: Meirion Morris

: Organ Recital

by Dr. HAROLD RHODES
From COVENTRY CATHEDRAL
Relayed from BIRMINGHAM

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. Harold Rhodes

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

RECEPTION TEST
2.30 Biology and Hygiene
Professor WINIFRED CULLIS , C.B.E.: ' Your
Body Every Day—II, The Blood and its Oxygen Supply under Difficulties'
2.55 Interval
3.0 English Literature
Mr. S. P. B. MAIS: Some Books I like—II, The
Wind in the Willows '

Contributors

Unknown: Professor Winifred Cullis

: THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL ORCHESTRA

Conductor, Sir DAN GODFREY
TOM BROMLEY (Pianoforte)
Relayed from THE PAVILION, BOURNEMOUTH
(Cor Anglais Solo, F. G. LAYFIELD LAYFIELD)
A LARGE share of Sibelius' music is concerned A with the folklore of his native Finland, and in more than one piece he deals with parts of the great epic of his own land—the Kalevala.
Tuonela is the Hades of the old Finnish mythology and all round it there runs a deep and swift-flowing river of dread black water. On it, the swan keeps majestic guard and sings.
To prove himself worthy of his bride,
Lem minkainen , one of the old Finnish heroes, was set the task, among other tests of skill and daring, of shooting the swan, and Sibelius' music seta forth the tale with all the vivid power which ho has at command. An English horn solo at the beginning of the work is the swan itself, and the big sonorous climax to which the music works up is the culmination of the tale, after which it sinks again to quietude.

Contributors

Conductor: Sir Dan Godfrey
Pianoforte: Tom Bromley
Unknown: F. G. Layfield
Unknown: Lem Minkainen

: REGINALD NEW

At THE ORGAN of THE BEAUFORT CINEMA
Relayed from WASHWOOD HEATH, BIRMINGHAM

: The Children's Hour

The first of ' The Adventures of Chatterer, the Red Squirrel,' from the book of that title
(Thornton W. Burgess )
Various Songs by STUART HIBBERD
Casablanca and Rabat-more personal experiences, written and told by DEREK McCULLOCH

Contributors

Unknown: Thornton W. Burgess
Songs By: Stuart Hibberd
Told By: Derek McCulloch

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

BEETHOVEN'S PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by DOROTHY MOGGRIDGE
Sonata in D Minor, Op. 31
Largo, Allegro ; Adagio ; Allegretto

Contributors

Played By: Dorothy Moggridge

: ' PLAYS AND THE THEATRE '

Mr. JAMES AGATE

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. James Agate

: 'THE COUNTRYSIDE'

Mr. FRANK PREWETT

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Frank Prewett

: ' What is Man ? '—IV

Dr. JOHN BAKER (University Demonstrator in Zoology, University Museum, Oxford) : ' The Evolution of Mind '

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. John Baker

: B.B.C. Symphony Concert-VII

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL, LONDON (Sole, Lessees, Messrs. Chappell andCo., Ltd.)
MYRA HESS
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Leader, ARTHUR CATTERALL )
Conducted by Sir LANDON RONALD
APART from the interest which Goethe's poetry had for Beethoven, the figure of ' Egmont himself in the play made the same kind of appeal to his sympathies as Coriolanus and other heroes, and, though the music to the play was commissioned for Vienna, Beethoven told a friend that ho had composed it out of love for the story. He composed not only the overture, but four entr'actes, the two songs which Clarchen sings in the course of the play, a beautiful little piece which is played at the moment of her death on the stage, when the candle which stands beside her flickers out as she draws her last breath, a melodrama which accompanies Egmont's dream, and a Symphony of Victory which comes immediately after his farewell speech upon the scaffold. The music is on a splendid plane, and it is a thousand pities that in this country we have so few chances of hearing any of it except the overture. It, to be sure, is likely to hold its place for always as among the noblest things Beethoven gave us. It is a real overture to the play, forming a concise epitome of the story, and at the same time standing securely on its own feet as music.
ONE of the artists of world-wide renown of whom London is very justly proud, Myra Hess was born there, carried out all her musical training at its great schools, and made her debut at its Queen's Hall. She was then only seventeen, but her masterly playing of the Beethoven Concerto in G, with the Beecham orchestra, won immediate success, and she very quickly took her place among the foremost pianists of our time. All over Europe and on the other fide of the Atlantic, where she has made repeated concert tours in Canada and in the States, she is acclaimed as an artist of very wide attainmments. Her repertoire embraces practically everytliing that is worth while in the literature of her . instrument, from Scarlatti's Sonatas, Bach's 48, and Beethoven, to Schumann, Brahms, and the moderns, and in all of these her musicianly insight is as obvious as her brilliant and easy technique. Young composers, especially of England, owe her a great deal too, for the generous way in which she has so often brought out new and unknown music.
THIS is one of several big works mentioned
-L in a letter of Beethoven's, dated in December 1800, as having been composed that year. The first six String Quartets, a String Qnintet, the Horn Sonata and the B Flat Pianoforte Sonata (Opus 22) all belong to 1800, proving the immense energy and industry with which ho was working.
The C Minor Concerto was not played in public until three years later-on April 5, 1803, in the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven took the solo part himself, and tho programme included besides, the Second Symphony, and the cantata ' The Mount of Olives.' The Concerto, by all accounts, in spite of difficulties at rehearsal, made a better impression than the Symphony. Modelled pretty closely on Mozart's pattern, it begins none the less to reveal something of the Beethoven of the splendid middle period.

Contributors

Unknown: Myra Hess
Leader: Arthur Catterall
Conducted By: Sir Landon Ronald
Unknown: Myra Hess

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
Bulletin

: Symphony Concert

(Continued)
Sergei Vassilievich Rachmaninov was only nine when he entered the Conservatoire of St. Petersburg as a pianoforte student. Three years later he was transferred to Moscow, leaving it as the winner of the Gold Medal for Composition. He was among the most brilliant pupils, both as composer and as pianist, which that famous school has turned out, and his training was associated with several members of the Russian school whose names are best known to us in this country. Immediately after leaving the Conservatoire he embarked on a long concert tour, appearing in all the chief towns in Europe with immediate success. He made his first appearance in England at a Philharmonic Concert in London, in 1899, in the three-fold role of pianist, conductor, and composer. For a time he was orchestral conductor at the Imperial Theatre in Moscow, resigning that post in 1906 to go and live in Dresden ; the symphony to be played this evening was composed there. Since the Russian revolution, however, he has spent much of his time in the United States.

This is the second of his two symphonies; it is dedicated to his former master for composition, Taneiev.
Modelled pretty closely on the old classic forms, it is none the less definitely modem in expression. There are four movements, the first beginning with a slow introduction which hints at the themes of the big Allegro to which it leads. The second corresponds to the traditional scherzo and trio, the third is a finely melodious slow movement, and the last alternates between robust vigour and a more serene mood. It is interrupted once by a reminder of the slow movement.

Tickets can be obtained from [address removed]
(Prices 2s. to 12s., including Entertainments Tax)

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND from MONSEIGNEUR

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox








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