• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: 'GREAT OCCASIONS IN OTHER LANDS '—XII

Mrs. NOEL BAKER : ' Greeco '
GREECE is another of those Balkan countries that are so rich in picturesque customs and ceremonies. Mrs. Noel Baker is well qualified to talk about Greece : she owns estates in that country, and has spent a great part of her life there. She is a friend of Dr. Nansen, the great Norwegian scientist and explorer. Her husband, Mr. Philip Noel Baker , was M.P. for Coventry, and Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Foreign Secretary in the last Government. After the War, when Nansen, as High Commissioner for Refugees to the League of Nations, was arranging for the establishment of Russian, Greek, and Armenian refugees, Mr. Noel Baker was associated with his work in the direction of bringing Greek exiles in Asia Minor back to Greece.

Contributors

Unknown: Mrs. Noel Baker
Unknown: Mrs. Noel Baker
Unknown: Mr. Philip Noel Baker
Unknown: Mr. Noel Baker

: A Light Classical Concert

MOLLY MITCHELL (Contralto)
The WIGMORE TRIO

Contributors

Contralto: Molly Mitchell

: THE COMMODORE GRAND ORCHESTRA

Directed by JOSEPH MUSCANT
From THE COMMODORE THEATRE, HAMMERSMITH

Contributors

Directed By: Joseph Muscant

: For the Schools

RECEPTION TEST

2.30 WORLD HISTORY
Mr. Norman H. Baynes, F.B.A.: "Empires, Movements, and Nations - Story VI, The Roman Empire and the Triumph of Christianity"

3.0 Interval

3.5 STORIES FOR YOUNGER PUPILS - II
Miss Rhoda Power: "Why the Hoopoe has a Crest" (Arabic)

3.20 Interval

3.25 FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Mademoiselle Camille Viere: French Reading VI, Selections from "An Anthology of French Verse — From Villon to Verlaine" (This book, by Ritchie and Moore, is published by Dew, price 3s. 6d.)

Contributors

Speaker: Norman H. Baynes
Speaker: Rhoda Power
Speaker: Camille Viere

: Moschetto and his Orchestra

From The Dorchester Hotel

: The Children's Hour

A HIGHLAND GATHERING AT HAGGIS HALL
(To celebrate St. Andrew's Day)
Written and Arranged by DEREK McCULLOCH
(Continued overleaf.)

Contributors

Unknown: Haggis Hall
Arranged By: Derek McCulloch

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL News
BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report, and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

BEETHOVEN'S PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by DOROTHY MOGGRIDGE
Sonata in C, Op. 53 (Waldstoin)
Allegro con brio; Introduzione, Adagio molto; Hondo, Allegretto moderato

Contributors

Played By: Dorothy Moggridge

: 'NEW BOOKS'

Miss V. SACKVILLE-WEST

: ' Why does Poverty Continue ? '—IV

Mr. D. H. ROBERTSON (lecturer in Economics, Cambridge University) : ' The Jerkiness of Progress*

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. D. H. Robertson

: Frae a' the Airts

A Programme for St.
Andrew's Night
(FromEdiiiburrjli)

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND
GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: 'War or Peace '-IV

'The New Warfare—III,
Chemical Warfare '
A talk between Capt. J. DAVID -SON-PRATT, D.Sc., F.I.C., and Capt. B. H. LIDDELL HART
THIS is Captain Liddell Hart 's third interview, and is designed to elucidate the prin. ciples and possibilities of chemical warfare. Many will remember the horrors of . poison-gas during the war, when it was only in its infancy. Nowadays, scientific research moves at such it paco that it may soon become the most terrible weapon of the future. Captain J. David -son Pratt. the authority to be interviewed by Captain Liddell Hart , is a mimber of the Chemical Defence Committee of the War Office.

Contributors

Unknown: Capt. J. David
Unknown: Capt. B. H. Liddell Hart
Unknown: Captain Liddell Hart
Unknown: Captain J. David
Interviewed By: Captain Liddell Hart

: Chamber Music

The Pro Arte String Quartet:
ALPHONSE ONNOU (Violin), LAURENT HALLEUX (Violin), GERMAIN PREVOST (Viola),
MARCEL MAAS (Violoncello)
BRUSSELS is very rightly proud of this fine team of artists, each a distinguished solo player and teacher of his instrument. For some years now the personnel has remained unchanged, and constant rehearsal and performance together have made them one of the world's quartets whoso complete sympathy of ideals and understanding of one another produces ensemble playing as nearly perfect as this generation has heard. They have long been welcome visitors to this country, and are almost as confidently at home in London as on the Continent: they have already broadcast on a good many occasions. Their repertoire includes practically all the host music which has ever been composed for the string quartet, though for some years they have devoted much of their time and gifts to the propagation of the newest music. In collaboration with Paul Collaer, they have given, year by year, regular series of concerts in which music of the most advanced schools of all countries has been presented with the advantages which such playing can give it.
BEETHOVEN
Quartet in B Flat, Op. 18, No.6
Allegro; Adagio appassionato; Scherzo; Allegro Grosse Fuge, tantot libre, tantôt recherche (Op. 133)
ORIGINALLY the last movement of the B Flat String Quartet, Op. 130, the Great
Fugue was afterwards published separately as Op. 133 for strings, with the title 'tantôt libre, tantôt recherche,' and as Op. 134, arranged by Beethoven himself for pianoforte (four hands).
The Quartet was first played by ochuppanzigh.
Linke, and other friends of the Master, and though two of the movements were encored, the fugue was damned by everyone - players and hearers alike. When Beethoven, on his death-bed, was told so by some tactful caller, he replied : It will please them one day.' It is even now not by any means universally known and understood. The easiest way to grasp its big design is to think of it as in six divisions, each of which is again divided, with one principal theme binding it together-the counter-subject of the first fugue, which becomes afterwards the subject of the second.
Quartet in F (Op. 135)
Allegretto; Vivace; Lento e tranquillo; Grave, Allegro
The last of Beethoven's quartets is more conventional in its design than its four predecessors, and the opening movement makes use of the classical sonata form without much in the way of modification. It is full of a gracious charm. The slow movement is always counted us one of the most precious gems in all the riches which Beethoven gave us: it is founded chiefly on a song phrase of simple but very eloquent beauty, peaceful and resigned in mood. The last movement has aroused endless discussion, and to this day no one quite understands what. Beethoven meant when he wrote at the head of it, 'Der schwergefasste Entschluss' (the resolve which could be grasped only with difficulty). There are two phrases which sound like question and answer, the first with the words: 'Must it be?' and the other answering very decidedly: 'It must be.'

Contributors

Violin: Laurent Halleux
Viola: Marcel Maas
Unknown: Paul Collaer
Unknown: Allegro Grosse Fuge

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND, from
MONSEIGNEUR

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel