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Listings

: ' GRANDMOTHERS' TALES '—II

Miss M. SIDGwicK: Buried Treasure '

: A Sonata Recital

SECCHI SANNA (Violin)
FREDERICK BONTOFT (Pianoforte)

Contributors

Pianoforte: Frederick Bontoft

: Organ Recital

by WALTER VALE

: A RECITAL OF GRAMOPHONE RECORDS

By CHRISTOPHER STONE

Contributors

Unknown: Christopher Stone

: For THE SCHOOLS

RECEPTION TEST

: Rural Science

Mr. C. E. HUDSON : 'The School Garden-IV,
The Winter Pruning of Fruit Trees '

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. C. E. Hudson

: ' LIFE AND WORK IN THE BRITISH ISLES '—VII

Mr. JOHN THOMAS : 'The Potter and the Potteries'

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. John Thomas

: Concert to Schools

THE B.B.C. STUDIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Conducted by VICTOR HELY HUTCHINSON
The Concert introduced by Sir WALFORD DAVIES

Contributors

Conducted By: Victor Hely Hutchinson
Introduced By: Sir Walford Davies

: MOSCHETTO AND HIS ORCHESTRA

From the DORCHESTER HOTEL

: The Children's Hour

Various Songs by STUART HIBBERD
The Story of ' Five Cocks a-Crowing '
(Molly McIntosh )
At approximately 5.35 p.m., ' Here and There,' Summary of the Week's News, by STEPHEN KING-HALL

Contributors

Songs By: Stuart Hibberd
Unknown: Molly McIntosh
Unknown: Stephen King-Hall

: The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

SCHUMANN PIANOFORTE MUSIC
Played by FRANK MANNHEIMER
Bunte Blatter , Op. 99
Praeludium, Marsch, Abondmusik, Scherzo Geschwindmarsch

Contributors

Played By: Frank Mannheimer
Played By: Bunte Blatter

: ' THE CINEMA'

Mr. FRANCIS BIRRELL

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Francis Birrell

: ' LEARNING TO LIVE ' —VI

Professor J. DovER WILSON , Litt.D. (Professor of Education in the University of London): Looking Forward '

Contributors

Unknown: Professor J. Dover Wilson

: A Recital

by MAGGIE TEYTE (Soprano)
JOHN HUNT (Pianoforte)
Maggie Teyte was only fifteen, when she went to Paris to study with Joan do Reszke, and only eighteen when she scored her first great triumph as 'Melisande' in Debussy's opera. A year later she made hep first appearance in England at the Queen's Hall, and followed up her success by brilliant performances in Beecham's Opera seasons in such parts as Cheruhino. Marguerite, Antonia (Tales of Hoffmann), and again' as Melisande. The United States were not long in claiming a share of her gifts, and for many years she has been as popular there as in the rest of the world. Equally successful as a concert singer and as an operatic artist, she is indeed one of whom England and her native town of Wolverhampton are rightly very proud.
John Hunt was one of London's Blue Coat boys. After leaving Christ's Hospital, he was a private pupil of Isador Epstein for two years, and then, for the next throe years, hold a Royal Academy scholarship. Two further years of study followed, with Arthur Schnabel in Berlin. His first appearance in a recital there last December was a remarkable success for so young an artist. He has only recently given his first recitals in London, winning high opinions here too.

Contributors

Soprano: Maggie Teyte
Pianoforte: John Hunt

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: Concert Version of the Comic Opera

The Emerald Isle
By ARTHUR SULLIVAN and EDWARD GERMAN
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
THE B.B.C. LIGHT ORCHESTRA
Conducted by JOSEPH LEWIS
THE older Savoyards, as the Gilbert and Sullivan enthusiasts carne to be called, can look back happily to The Rose of Persia, producod at the Savoy at the end of 1899. It was given so warm a welcome that it seemed as though a new era of success was beginning in the scene of so many long runs. Its libretto was by Basil
Hood. and he and Sullivan were collaborators in The Emerald Isle, which was to be the next opera in the series. Sullivan died before his share of the task was much more than sketched out. Ho had completed the first two numbers, and left tho melodies of ten others, including the Finale, Act I. These were orchestrated, and nine new numbers were added by, German ; it was ho, too, who made this concert version.
The opera was produced in April, 1901, and from the very outset it has always been difficult for any but an export, to say which of the music is Sullivan's and which is
German's. It is all full of that delightfully happy melody which made tho Gilbert and ' Sullivan, and afterwards the German, operas the best things, of their kind which the world possessos, and the music fits the text so closely as to form that completely satisfying unity which even Grand Opera only rarely achieves. In keeping with the setting of the tale, most of the music has a fresh Irish flavour, and the orchestral numbers include more than one merry jig.
The story is made up of that kind of whimsical nonsense for which the adjective ' Gilbertian ' had to be coined. Gilbert himself never invented any more absurd way of cutting a Gordian knot, and the solution at the very end of the opera of an apparently insoluble problem is as unexpected as it is mirth-compelling. But the tale unfolds itself so clearly that it would spoil the effect for any listeners who do not know it, to give the story away in advance.

Contributors

Unknown: Arthur Sullivan
Conducted By: Joseph Lewis
Lady Rosie Pippin: Mary Hamlin (soprano)
Molly O'Grady: Doris Owens (contralto)
Tereuco O'Brien: Edward Reach (tenor)
Pat Murphy: Stanley Riley (bass)

: DANCE MUSIC

THE NEW SAVOY HOTEL ORPHEANS, from the SAVOY
HOTEL








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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