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: ' OLD ENGLISH DISHES '—VI

Miss FLORENCE WHITE ('Mary Evelyn ')
'Frumenty'
THE tale of how Miss White, deter. mined to find out what frumenty is, followed clue after clue and finally tracked it down, is as exciting as a detective story. It is a very ancient dish, eatenin England in prehistoric times. It was (like Darioles) mentioned in Malory's 'Morte d'Arthur,' as' frumentee noble ' : it appears to have been eaten only with venison in the fifteenth century. It is made of hulled wheat boiled, not with milk, as the large Oxford Dictionary says, but also-and first-with water. It makes an excellent breakfast dish—much better than modern ' cereals '
-and the foundation for a delicious sweet. Miss White will give- recipes that show what a simple and cheap dish it is to prepare. This is the last of her six talks. Next week begins a series of favourite dishes of various nations.

Contributors

Unknown: Mary Evelyn

: EDWARD O'HENRY

At The ORGAN of TUSSAUD'S CINEMA

: Light Music

LEONARDO Kemp and his PICCADILLY HOTEL
ORCHESTRA
From THE PICCADILLY HOTEL

Contributors

Unknown: Leonardo Kemp

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Nature Study Mr.
ERIC PARKER : Round the Countryside-
IV, Rats and Volos '
THERE are two kinds of rat in England : one is much less pleasant than the other.
The black rat is the original British kind. The brown rat, which is larger, fiercer, and has shorter ears and tail, is an invader which comes originally from Central Asia, and is driving out practically all the black rats. There are brown rats all over the world, and everywhere they are spreading and exterminating the smaller kinds. But black rats like travelling in ships : so that they have got to some places that brown rats have not yet reached. Brown rats are absolute villains : they are nasty and dirty, fierce and cunning, and they carry plague. Voles (' water-rats ' and ' field-mice are harmless in comparison ; but they do a great deal of damage to crops. Curiously, there are none in Ireland, although they exist everywhere else between England and China.

Contributors

Unknown: Eric Parker

: Music

Sir WALFORD DAVIES : The A A B A
Pattern (2.30 Juniors; 3.0 Seniors)

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Walford Davies

: French

Monsieur
E. M. ST ÉPHAN : Early Stages in French—IV

Contributors

Unknown: E. M. St Éphan :

: FOR OLDER PUPILS

Unfinished Debate : ' That the Reading of Detective Stories is a Waste of Time'
Proposed by The Rev. H...N. ASMAN Opposed by Mr. R. F. CHOLMELEY

Contributors

Unknown: N. Asman
Unknown: Mr. R. F. Cholmeley

: THE TROCADERO ORCHESTRA

Directed by ALFRED VAN DAM
From THE TROCADERO CINEMA,
ELEPHANT AND CASTLE

Contributors

Directed By: Alfred Van

: The Children's Hour

A Toytown Dialogue Story (S. G. Hulme Beaman ) : 'Golf' (Toytown Rules), in which the Mayor and Mr. Growser, play 19 holes with Larry and Dennis very much to the Fore '
The whole Programme supported by THE
GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET

Contributors

Unknown: G. Hulme Beaman

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST. FIRST
GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers
, at 6.30

: The Foundations of Music

SPANISH PIANOFORTE MUSIC
Played by NIEDZIELSKI

: French Talk

Monsieur E. M. STÉPHAN
*

: The Wireless Military Band

Conductor, B. WALTON O'DONNELL
WINIFRED BURY (Pianoforte)

Contributors

Conductor: B. Walton O'Donnell
Pianoforte: Winifred Bury

: 'THE NEW SPIRIT IN LITERATURE '—III

The Hon. HAROLD NICOLSON :
C.M.G.; Changes in the Reading Public'
THIS week Mr. Harold Nieolson will describe the changes that have taken place in the reading public since the patronage system of the eighteenth century. Education, the popular Press, and wireless are developing the reading public more rapidly than ever today. Besides this increase in the size of the reading public, there is a difference in its angle of taste': books which supply information—books on science, biographies-are becoming more and more popular. Mr. Nicolson will discuss these changes in taste moro fully next week, and in the two following talks he will explain the effect of these two factors on modem authors.

Contributors

Unknown: Harold Nicolson
Unknown: Mr. Harold Nieolson

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND
GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: Peep-Bo-hemia

A Flight of Fancy on Wings of Song

: ' MOSAIC '—III

The Age of the Troubadours
" Of how, through Woman-Worship, knaves compound
With honoure; Kings rcck not of their domaine ;
Proud Pontiffs sigh; and War-men world renownd,
Toe win one Woman, all things else disdaine : Since Melicent doth in herselfe coutayne
All this world's riches that may fasre be found.'

: DANCE MUSIC

MAURICE WINNICK and his BAND from the 1 PICCADILLY HOTEL

Contributors

Unknown: Maurice Winnick








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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