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: Old English Dishes: V

Miss Florence White ('Mary Evelyn'): 'Flummery'
'Flummery: a name given to various sweet dishes made with milk, flour, eggs, etc.,' is what you will find in modern dictionaries.
This is not, however, the original meaning of the word. In Johnson's Dictionary (1755) it is defined as 'a kind of food made, by coagulation of wheatflour or oatmeal.' It was called 'wash-brew' in the West of England. Flummery allowed to turn sour is the same as the Scotch dish of 'sowans.' Miss White will give recipes for this, the original kind of flummery, and also for solid syllabub. Both are delicious sweets. The use of the word flummery in the eighteenth century to mean flattery or humbug, and in our grandfathers' mouths for any kind of 'silly nonsense,' no doubt dates from the time when any kind of sweet was a frivolous interruption of beef and beer and port and pipes. But flummery is a thoroughly English dish, and Miss White will give recipes for preparing it in the original way.

Contributors

Speaker: Florence White

: EDWARD O'HENRY

At THE ORGAN of TUSSAUD'S CINEMA

: Light Music

LEONARDO Kemp and his PICCADILLY HOTEL
ORCHESTRA
From THE PICCADILLY HOTEL

Contributors

Unknown: Leonardo Kemp

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Nature Study
Mr. ERIC PARKER : Round the Countryside—
111, Autumn Migrants '
2.25 Interval
2.30 Music
Sir WALFORD DAVIES : 'Phrases and Their Rhythms' (2.30 Juniors; 3.0 Seniors)
3.30 Interval
3-35 French
Monsieur E. M. STÉPHAN with Mademoiselle
COUSTENOBLE : ' Early Stages in French '—III
4.0 Interval
4.5 FOR OLDER PUPILS
Mr. GERALD HEARD : The Claims of Science
II, The Heavens : Astronomy '

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Eric Parker
Unknown: Sir Walford Davies
Unknown: Monsieur E. M. Stéphan

: THE TROCADERO ORCHESTRA

Directed by ALFRED VAN DAM
From THE TROCADERO CINEMA, ELEPHANT AND
CASTLE

Contributors

Directed By: Alfred Van

: The Children's Hour

The Children's Hour will revive Lewis Carroll 's ' Alice in Wonderland ' today with ' Down the Rabbit Hole,' arranged as a Dialogue Story
THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET will provide the Incidental Music
(A further Adventure in three weeks' time)

Contributors

Unknown: Lewis Carroll

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

DEBUSSY'S SONGS
Sung by CLAIRE CROIZA (Soprano)

Contributors

Sung By: Claire Croiza

: Vaudeville

ESTELLE BRODY
Light Songs
CHARLES WREFORD and DORA GREGORY
'The Old Age Pension,' by FRED ROME
JOAN STONEHEWER
Saw Solos
WISH WYNNE
Character Studies
JACK PAYNE and his B.B.C.
DANCE ORCHESTRA
WILLIAM STEPHENS
Syncopated Songs
JOAN STONEHEWER
Saw Solos
HARRY TATE and COMPANY in 'How are You ?
ESTELLE BRODY
Light Songs mONIGHT'S newcomer,
ESTELLE BRODY, is ono of the most prominent of our younger film-stars. She was born in Montreal of French-Canadian parentage in 1905. Before she took to the films, she was a dancer and singer. In 'silent' days she starred successfully in Mademoiselle from Armentières, Hindle Wakes , The Glad Eye, The Flight Commander, The Plaything, Kitty, etc. After an interval of stage and cabaret work, Miss Brody is now recruited to the ' talkies -a medium in which her charming singing voice should be a tremendous asset. HARRY TATE demands no introduction. For many years he has delighted vaudeville audiences with his unsteady moustache, in such famous burlesques as Fishing, Motoring, Billiards, In the Office, Selling a Car, and Flying. The richness of his humour and his characteristic voice have made him as successful on the microphone. Since his radio debut, some months ago, Harry Tate has given us Selling a Car, In the Office, and Fishing. WILLIAM STEPHENS , one of C. B. Cochran 's constellation of revue stars, has appeared in several radio revues. He was most recently heard in Archie de Ber's Crikey ! JOAN STONEHEWER , recently referred to by ' The Broadcasters ' as a ' virtuoso of the tool-box,' is a member of that rare band of artists who can make satisfactory music with a saw.

Contributors

Unknown: Estelle Brody
Unknown: Charles Wreford
Unknown: Dora Gregory
Unknown: Jack Payne
Unknown: Harry Tate
Unknown: Estelle Brody
Unknown: Hindle Wakes
Unknown: Harry Tate
Unknown: Harry Tate
Unknown: William Stephens
Unknown: C. B. Cochran
Unknown: Joan Stonehewer

: The Hon. Harold NICOLSON, C.M.G. : ' The New Spirit in Literature-II, The Reading Habit'

MR. HAROLD NICOLSON , in his second talk on Modern Literature, is going to discourse on the advantages of the reading habit as compared with other hobbies. Too few people realize that reading, like other hobbies, demands a considerable amount of effort, if one is to get the best out of it. One may waste a great deal of time reading the wrong books, or reading good books in the wrong way. Mr. Nicolson will outline a few general principles or rules for reading ; by following these, such errors may he avoided. The aim of this course is to help listeners to got full intellectual value from modern books, and some sort of ' technique ' of reading is the first step towards this.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Harold Nicolson

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: 'La Bohème '

(Puccini)
Act II
A Street in the Latin Quarter
Relayed from THE ROYAL OPERA House,
COVENT GARDEN
Cast of Characters:
Conductor, JOHN BARBIROLLI
ONE of the most deliciously melodious of all operas, La Boheme made Puccini's reputation when it was produced in 1896. The story is founded on scenes from Henri Miirger 's well-known novel, over the harsh poignancy of which Puccini has thrown a veil of tender lyricism.
Act I has shown us the four students, with scarcely a sou between them, making the best of life in the attic which is their common home. At the conclusion of the Act all have gone off to a cafe except Rudolph, who follows after them with his newly-found friend, Mimi, a pretty little sempstress living in the same house.
Act II is outside a cafe in the Latin Quarter of Paris. The scene is a gay one. The four students and Mimi are presently joined by Musetta, an old love of Marcel's, and her elderly admirer. The sprightly Musetta. bored by the older man, sends him off on an idle errand, and joins Marcel and the others. A military band passes through. All follow it down the street, leaving Musetta's abandoned beau to pay the bill on his'return to the cafe. *
Act MIT. A year has passed since Act II.
Despite their. love for each other, Rudolph and Mimi cannot keep from incessant bitter quarelling, and they have parted. The scene is outside an inn in winter. Mimi, who is ravaged with consumption, has come to see Marcel with a farewell message to Rudolph. However, Rudolph, coming out of the inn. sees her, and tries to win her back, but Mimi, realizing it would be useless, persists in bidding him farewell. The final quartet of this act, which coinbines the lyrical tenderness of Mimi's duet with Rudolph, and a bickering match between Marcel and Musetta, is almost without equal anywhere in opera for the skilfulness of the writing and its sheer beauty.

Contributors

Conductor: John Barbirolli
Unknown: Henri Miirger
Mimi: Joan Cross
Musetta: Nora Gruhn
Rudolph: Ben Williams
Marcel: Arthur Fear
Colline: Philip Bertram
Schaunard: William Michael
Alcindoro: Octave Dua
Pampignol: Percy Harris
Gendarme: Martin Quinn

: 'La Bohème '

(Continued)
Act III
The Toll Gate

: DANCE MUSIC

BERTINI'S DANCE BAND, relayed from THE TOWER BALLROOM,
BLACKPOOL








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