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: OLD ENGLISH DISHES —III'

Miss Florence WHITE (' Mary Evelyn ') : ' Oxford Sausages '
SAUSAGES must be about the earliest cooked food on record. They are mentioned in the first cookery book, Athenaeus' Dinner-table Philosophers (A.D. 228), and there was a Greek play called the Orya (The Sausage) produced in 500 B.C. Thus, sausages have given laughs to comedy audiences for 2,500 years. They are more popular than ever ; there are over 150 varieties, and in America nearly , a thousand million pounds are
- made every year. But if we are to believe Prof. Saintsbury , has probably the best palate in England, sausages are sadly on the decline. He has not, he says, tasted a sausage worthy of the tradition since the early 'eighties, and in particular he laments the complete decease of ' that admirable variety, the Oxford sausage, much herbed, skinless, and moulded into sausage-shape only just before cooking.' Let us hope that Miss White's talk will encourage a resurrection of this delicacy.

Contributors

Unknown: Mary Evelyn
Unknown: Prof. Saintsbury

: EDWARD O'HENRY

At THE ORGAN OF TUSSAUD'S CINEMA

: Light Music

LEONARDO KEMP and his PICCADILLY HOTEL
ORCHESTRA
From THE PICCADILLY HOTEL

Contributors

Unknown: Leonardo Kemp

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Nature Study
Mr. ERIC PARKER : Round the Countryside-
I, A Stubble-field ' mODAY the Tuesday series begin. For older pupils Mr. Gerald Heard gives the first of his fortnightly talks on ' The Claims of Science.' He is well known to adult listeners for his talks on ' This Surprising World.' On the other Tuesdays unfinished debates' will be held, in which two speakers will open the debate on each side; broadcasting will then cease, and the listeners will continue the debate or discuss the speeches. This is a now experiment. M. Stephen will conduct his course on the Early Stages in French on a different system, the first fifteen minutes of cach lesson being more especially for younger, the last ten minutes for older, pupils. Sir Watford Davies will continue his music lessons, for junior and for senior pupils. Mr. Eric Parker 's Nature Study course for junior pupils has now been planned over a period of three years, each year of which, however, is complete in itself. Today he starts on a tour ' Round the Countryside.'

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Eric Parker
Unknown: Mr. Gerald Heard
Unknown: M. Stephen
Unknown: Sir Watford Davies
Unknown: Mr. Eric Parker

: Music

Sir WALFORD DAVIES : 'How a Tune is formed,' (2.30, Juniors
—3.0, Seniors)

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Walford Davies

: French

Monsieur E. M. STÉPHAN with Mademoiselle COUSTENOBLE :
'Early Stages in French '—I

Contributors

Unknown: Monsieur E. M. Stéphan

: FOR OLDER PUPILS:

Mr GERALD HEARD : The Claims of Science—I,
Introductory. The object we wish to study '

Contributors

Unknown: Mr Gerald Heard

: The Trocadero Orchestra

Directed by Alfred van Dam
From The Trocadero Cinema, Elephant and Castle

Contributors

Directed By: Alfred van Dam

: The Children's Hour

' Frightfnlness at the Theatre Royal '
(S. G. Hulme Beaman )
Another Toytown Adventure
With Incidental Music by THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET

Contributors

Unknown: G. Hulme Beaman

: ' The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

BEETHOVEN'S PIANOFORTE SONATAS
Played by EDWARD ISAACS
Sonata in A Flat, Op. 26
Andante con variazioni; Scherzo ; Marcia funebre ; Allegro

Contributors

Played By: Edward Isaacs

: Mr. DESMOND MACCARTHY: 'The Spirit of Modern Literature: An Introduction to the Series'

MR. DESMOND MacCARTHY is one of the most popular and regular' talkers' over the wireless. He has now broadcast literary criticims and book reviews almost every fortnight since 1925. Formerly dramatic and literary critic, he is Editor of that enterprising monthly, Life and Letters, now in its fourth year of existence. He will introduce the series of talks on ' Literature and Art,' which forms part of the Changing World symposium. These talks will review modern developments in literature, drama, the Press, and art. Mr. MacCarthy will survey the whole series of twenty-four talks, the first, and literary, part of which will be opened next week by Mr. Harold Nicolson.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Desmond MacCarthy
Unknown: Mr. Harold Nicolson.

: Promenade Concert

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL (Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
Russian Composers
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by SIR HENRY WOOD
HAROLD WILLIAMS (Baritone)
SOLOMON (Pianoforte)
COMPOSER of the most successful piece of music that ever came out of Russia, by virtue of which the man in the street knows not only his name, but how to pronounce it, Rachmaninov has written far finer music than the noise made by that tin for so long tied to his tail. As early as 1899, before the curse was laid upon him, he came to England and distinguished himself as composer, conductor, and pianist at a Philharmonic concert. Since then ho has toured the world as a pianist of great distinction, composed a deal of music of a lithe and graceful beauty, of an unashamed health and sanity, in an artistic age that pretends to find small virtue in these qualities. This concerto is Rachmaninov at his best. He now lives in the United
States, amongst a people to whom he has expressed himself as grateful, for no sooner had he landed than the Americans, having the interests of American culture at heart, shamelessly jazzed the notorious prelude, and lifted the curse from its unhappy author.
ALEXANDRE MOSSOLOV , though he is only thirty-one, has already made a name in Russia, for even in that land of shattering artistic revolutions, he has found a method of revolting which is all his own. This work, composed in 1928, is in the form of an overture, and its programme is simply the steady rhythm of a factory working at full pressure; though behind the mere picture there is conveyed the sense of awe and exaltation which cannot fail to possess the man of imagination confronted with the powerful weapons of attack and defence man has set up under the very nose of antagonistic nature.

Contributors

Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Baritone: Harold Williams
Unknown: Alexandre Mossolov

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS
Bulletin

: ' MOSAIC '—I

IT seems possible-to judge from the violent criticism of past broadcasts of poetry-readings-that wireless is not a suitable medium for poetry, or at least that some other form of presentation might be more successful. Apart from any question of the destruction of the intimate quality of poetry or of the difficulty of finding suitable readers, it is doubtful whether fifteen or twenty minutes of continuous poetry are likely to appeal to any but confirmed lovers of poetry. It has, therefore, been decided to try a new variation in the form in which poetry is broadcast. 'Mosaic' —the title of which is suggested by Marvell's definition of music as ' mosaic of the air'—is an experiment in which music and poetry are to be combined to express and interpret various moods. Lyric poems or short excerpts, linked by a unity of subject or feeling, will bo blended with pieces of music of simi]ar emotional appeal into a single whole.

: DANCE MUSIC

Roy Fox and his BAND, from
MONSEIGNEUR

Contributors

Unknown: Roy Fox








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

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