• Show TV Channels

    Hide TV Channels

    TV
  • Show Radio Channels

    Hide Radio Channels

    Radio
  • Show Years

    Hide Years

    Year
  • Issues

Close group

Close group

Day Navigation

Listings

: The Child's World: II: What Are Good Manners?

A Discussion between Two Mothers
In this, the second of the 'Child's World' series of talks, the all-important problem of teaching children manners will be debated between two mothers. The last generation believed that children should be 'seen and not heard,' that to 'spare the rod' was to 'spoil the child,' and other inflexible maxims of that kind. Modern psychologists, however, do not regard the problem as being quite as simple as that. Children are, consequently, allowed nowadays to behave much more naturally than they used to do. This discussion between an 'advanced' mother and a sympathetic champion of more conventional views, should straighten out 'knots' in the minds of many puzzled parents.

: REGINALD FOORT

At THE ORGAN of THE REGAL, MARBLE
ARCH

: EVENSONG

From WESTMINSTER ABBEY

: Light Music

THE CROSVENOR HOUSE ORCHESTRA
Directed by Joseph MEEUS
From GROSVENOR HOUSE, PARK LANE

Contributors

Directed By: Joseph Meeus

: The Children's Hour

Songs from ' Now we aro Six ' (A. A. Milna), set. to music by H. FRASER-SIMSON , and sung by DALE SMITH
'Kanga and Baby Roo come to the Forest' from 'Winnie the Pooh' (.4. A. Milne )

Contributors

Music By: H. Fraser-Simson
Sung By: Dale Smith
Unknown: A. Milne

: ' The First News '

WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN ; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

SCHUMANN'S SONGS
Sung by EVELYN ARDEN and GEORGE PARKER

Contributors

Sung By: Evelyn Arden
Sung By: George Parker

: Housing: VI

Dr. Raymond Unwin: 'A Plan for Housing'
This is the last of the series of housing talks, and forms a summary and unification of the various aspects discussed in the series. Dr. Raymond Unwin is an architect and a leading authority on town-planning; he laid out New Earswick, York, and the first garden city at Letchworth. He has been connected with Government Housing and Town-Planning since before the War, and is now Chief Advisor to the Greater London Regional Town-Planning Committee. He collaborated with Mr. Thomas Adams in the 'Plan for London' supplement of The Listener in the summer.

Contributors

Unknown: Dr. Raymond Unwin
Unknown: Dr. Raymond Unwin
Unknown: Mr. Thomas Adams

: Mr. J. A. FRASER ROBERTS, B.Sc., F.R.S.E. : 'Some Biological Effects of Toleration'

MR. FRASER ROBERTS is a brilliant young biologist who has been working for some time with Professor Crew, of Edinburgh. The latter is the pioneer of a new branch of biology; he has discovered many queer facts in the realm of animal genetics and heredity. Mr. Fraser Roberts is n specialist in human heredity, and must have some interesting things to tell us about ourselves.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Fraser Roberts
Unknown: Mr. Fraser Roberts

: Promenade Concert

Relayed from The QUEEN'S HALL
(Sole Lessees, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
DELIUS
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
(Principal Violin, CHARLES
WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
DORA LABBETTE (Soprano)
ORREA PERNEL (Violin)
KATHARINE GOODSON (Pianoforte)
ORCHESTRA
A Dance Rhapsody (No. i)
MAKING its first appearance at the Festival at Hereford in 1909, when its composer was forty-six, the first Dance Rhapsody has always been, and deservedly so, among the most popular of Delius' purely orchestral works. There is a short introduction, in which we are given a foretaste of some of the tunes which are to be used in building it up. The oboe, the flute, and the horns, in turn, liave the chief shares in the statement of the themes. There follows a section in quicker tempo, where a new tune is heard, on the lower strings and bassoons, while soon afterwards the violins, playing in octaves, give us still another now theme. These are all worked out at some length, with constantly varied interest, and then we hear again the dance tune which the oboe played at first, now on the flute and clarinet. The music rises to a climax and then makes way for a slow section. The theme of this is again the first tune, now played by first violin alone, with accompaniment from the other strings. But the bustling mood of the first part returns, and the Rhapsody comes to an end with great strength and vigour.
DORA LABBETTE and Orchestra
Whither ?
Twilight Fancies Sweet Venevil
ORREA PERNEL and Orchestra
Violin Concerto fTUIERE would seem to be that -L about a violin concerto which either too seriously taxes the resources of a composer or completely exhausts his inspiration. So many of the groat ones, having dutifully given to the world one work of this kind, do not repeat the effort. Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky, Elgar, and Delius all have but one concerto for violin and orchestra to their credit, and there must obviously be some significance in the fact. Each of them must well have known that the virtuoso's, no less than the public's, appetite grows with what it feeds upon. Listeners can now judge for themselves whether this creative reticence is not as regrettable with Dolius as with any of the others.
ORCHESTRA
A Song of Summer
(First performance)
THIS most recent work of Delius, which is to have its first -performance tonight, was composed in 1929-30. There is the poignant fact about it, that the recording of the composition on paper was made necessarily by dictation. It is scored for full orchestra. The work opens in a mood of contemplation, characteristic of the composer. In a sustained background of strings little snatches of melody in the woodwinds weave themselves into the harmonic texture of the early mood, about which a solo violin plays wistfully a tune which heralds a theme which is presently to assume supreme importance. The music broadens out into a strenuous passage for the full orchestra, whioh leads into one of quieter beauty. Further development merges into the appearance of a long-withheld theme which, growing in intensity, finds its climax in rich harmonies in the brass, to end serenely in the strings.
KATHARINE GOODSON and Orchestra
Pianoforte Concerto
DELIUS was thirty before his first work was given to the public, and after eleven more years only twu others had seen the light. Thin concerto is work number three in order of appearance. Composed in 1897, it lay for seven years
.. on the shelf, waiting for a first performance, or, more truthfully, waiting for Delius himself to lift the ban of his own remorseless criticism. which, in effect, was not definitely lifted until after a full and Second revision in 1907. It is characterist ic of such men as Delius, Vaughan Williams , and a regrettably few others to realize that music, like wine, is all the better for being matured in . the wood before it is bottled for consumption.
ORCHESTRA
An English Rhapsody, Brigg Fair

Contributors

Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Soprano: Dora Labbette
Pianoforte: Katharine Goodson
Unknown: Orrea Pernel
Unknown: Katharine Goodson
Unknown: Vaughan Williams

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND
GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: 'LIVING DANGEROUSLY'—IV

A Discussion between
Mr.S.P.B.MAIS and Mr. HOLT MARVELL

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. Holt Marvell

: THE GERSHOM PARKINGTON QUINTET

Selection of Guy D'Hardelot's Songs

: DANCE MUSIC

JACK PAYNE and his B.B.C. DANCE
ORCHESTRA

Contributors

Unknown: Jack Payne








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
Continue Cancel