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: ' OLD ENGLISH DISHES '—II

Miss FLORENCE WHITE ('Mary Evelyn ) : ' Cheesecakes or Darioles'
Housewives' News
THE most astonishing I thing about cheesecakes to the layman is that they contain no cheese. Originally, they were made with curds, and were introduced from the East. They are, for example, mentioned in ' The Arabian Nights.' ' Darioles' first meant ' maids of honour' (derived from the French dames royales), the name still given to cheesecakes at Richmond ; then they came to mean in France a kind of meat-pie, ' small pasty, filled with flesh, herbs, and spices, mingled and minced together,' the word is translated in Cotgrave's French Dictionary (1611); and in England the same as custards or crustades, which up to 1600 were open pies of meat or fruit covered with thickened broth or milk, and spiced. Now it is all simpler; meat-pies are meat-pies or sausage-rolls, or Melton-Mowbrays, and 'darioles,' in modern French, just cheese. cakes. Darioles, at all events, have a distinguished history ; according to Malory, they were great delicacies at the court of King Arthur, and Scott, who knew his stuff about the Middle Ages, mentions them in Ouentin Durward. ' Miss White has receipts dating back to 1391, so doubtless a million tea-tables will go suddenly mediæval this afternoon.

Contributors

Unknown: Mary Evelyn
Unknown: Ouentin Durward.

: EDWARD O'HENRY

At THE ORGAN of TUSSAUD'S CINEMA.

: Light Music

LEONARDO KEMP and his PICCADILLY HOTEL
ORCHESTRA
From THE PlCCADILLY HOTEL

Contributors

Unknown: Leonardo Kemp

: Experimental Transmission

for the Radio I
Research Board by the Fultograph Process

: A Sonata

SONIA MOLDAWSKY (Violin)
ESTHER FISHER (Pianoforte)
UPON Gabriel Faure , who died in 1924, in his eightieth year, a great many official distinctions were conferred, including the rare one of a ' National Homage ' at the Sorbonne in 1922, when he was elected to the highest class in the Legion of Honour. Considering that he produced a great quantity (over 120 works) of charming music, eclectic and urbane, typical of the best qualities in French music of his day, it is somewhat surprising that comparatively little of it is commonly played in England. The First Violin Sonata, written in 1876, is in the usual four movements, the exceedingly lively scherzo coming second, ' and the slow movement third.

Contributors

Pianoforte: Esther Fisher
Unknown: Gabriel Faure

: THE TROCADERO ORCHESTRA

Directed by ALFRED VAN DAM
From THE TROCADERO CINEMA, ELEPHANT
AND CASTLE

Contributors

Directed By: Alfred Van

: The Children's Hour

Lady TREE, the Children and the Professor entertain

: 'The First News'

WEATHER FORECAST, First GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN; London Stock Exchange Report and Bulletin for Farmers

: The Foundations of Music

SCHUMANN'S SONGS
Sung by EVELYN ARDEN and GEORGE PARKER

Contributors

Sung By: Evelyn Arden
Sung By: George Parker

: ' HOUSING '—V

Mr. H. H. HUMPHRIES : 'Municipal Housing
Schemes'
MR. H. H. HUMPHRIES is City Engineer and Surveyor of Birmingham, and has put through several very progressive
Municipal Housing Schemes there. He has no equal as an expert on Municipal Property Management and Housing problems. Birmingham makes a practice of buying estates and developing them; probably no other Corporation owns so much property. Mr. Humphries is thus well qualified to speak of Municipal Housing
Schemes, and he has the additional advantage' for -this talk of being able to explain technical matters to lay audiences simply and clearly.

Contributors

Unknown: Mr. H. H. Humphries
Unknown: Mr. H. H. Humphries

: Promenade Concert

Relayed from THE QUEEN'S HALL (Sole Lessess, Messrs. Chappell and Co., Ltd.)
THE B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
(Principal Violin, CHARLES WOODHOUSE)
Conducted by Sir HENRY WOOD
MARGOT HINNENBERG-LEFEBRE
(Soprano) ..
ROY HENDERSON (Baritone)
CYRIL SCOTT (Pianoforte)
ALBAN BERG was horn in Vienna in 1885. As a student he came under the influence of Sehonberg, who taught him to walk in the ways of modernity. But Berg soon showed he could run faster than his master, and lost no time in developing advanced theories of his own. His most important work is the opera Wozzeck, a type of music-drama different from any yet conceived. In it he has exploited his main innovation, the pitched spoken word in the place of the lyric treatment usual in opera. To judge by its extravagant reception abroad, he has made a success of his invention. The songs to be heard tonight will give some idea of the means by which Berg gets his remarkable effects in Wozzeck, an opera which we are not very likely to hear in London. For one thing, it is far too new; for another, far too morbid. In any case, it is said that a singer takes a year, at least, to learn the music, and that is longer by nearly a year than is usually allowed an opera singer in England.
CYRIL SCOTT is one of those versatile people who win distinction in more than one field.
He is a composer, a poet, and an author of note on philosophic subjects. Bora in Cheshiro in 1879, he was a student at Frankfurt, where more than one other young Englishman who has since stepped into the front rank of composers was with him. At the end of his student career, he lived for a time in Liverpool; teaching and playing, and his first important orchestral piece, the Heroic Suite, was played there as well as at Manchester, with Riehter conducting. So*on afterwards, his Pelleas and Melisande was given at Frankfurt. Other works of his have figured at Sir Henry Wood 's concerts and elsewhere ; Sir Thomas Beecham has interested himself in more than one of them, and as far afield as Vienna,' his chamber music and at least one orchestral piece have been played. Although many of his smaller works, especially songs and pianoforte pieces, are long ago well-established favourites, not only here, but abroad, such bigger pieces as this Concerto, published in 1922, are much less well known. He deserves a more important position than his native country accords him for his bigger and more serious works. We are given too few opportunities of hearing them. In some ways less definitely English than that of most of his contemporaries, his music is in every way original and modern without any of the more startling dissonant effects in which the present-day composer inclines to express himself.

Contributors

Conducted By: Sir Henry Wood
Soprano: Margot Hinnenberg-Lefebre
Baritone: Roy Henderson
Pianoforte: Cyril Scott
Unknown: Alban Berg
Unknown: Cyril Scott
Unknown: Sir Henry Wood
Unknown: Sir Thomas Beecham

: ' The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL
NEWS BULLETIN

: DANCE MUSIC

HENRY HALL'S GLENEAGLES HOTEL BAND, from GLENEAGLES HOTEL, PERTHSHIRE








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