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Listings

: Play School

Birds that waddle, birds that fly,
On a farm or in the sky
Today's story: 'A Goose Called Fred' by Joan Watson.

Contributors

Presenter: Miranda Connell
Presenter: Rick Jones
Author of Story: Joan Watson

: Closedown

: Open University

: Interval

: Man in his Place: Boom Town

The Coventry car-worker regards himself as the aristocrat of labour and his wages are the envy of the whole British work force. What sort of place is Coventry to live in?

Contributors

Producer: Peter Jarvis

: Newsroom

With Keith Graves.
Reporting the world tonight with the BBC's reporters and correspondents at home and abroad.
Weather

Contributors

Newsreader: Keith Graves

: Man Alive: The Right Time to Die

A weekly programme which focuses on people and the situations which shape their lives.
Reporters Jeremy James, Jeanne La Chard, Denis Tuohy, Desmond Wilcox and Harold Williamson
We can keep people alive these days longer than ever before. Advances in medicine enable us to prolong the existence of old people for years, even those who are infirm, incontinent and incapacitated. New techniques enable doctors to hold on to badly injured patients where previously death would have been a certainty.
But how many times should doctors cure - only to prolong a dwindling existence? And should it be doctors who have to decide? There are those who demand what is known as voluntary euthanasia, claim the right to decide when they, or their loved ones, shall die. Some doctors agree with them. Most doctors will admit that huge doses of pain-killing drugs, used in cases of terminal disease, can have the effect of 'shortening life.' But is that just another phrase for 'killing the patient'? Do any of us have the right to decide when it is time to die?

Contributors

Producer: David Filkin
Editor: Desmond Wilcox
Editor: Bill Morton

: A Song for St David

Starring Stuart Burrows, Pendyrus Male Choir chorus master Glynne Jones and featuring Delyth Hopkins.

A few of Wales's finest voices in a Gala Concert for St David 's Day from the New Theatre, Cardiff with the BBC Welsh Orchestra leader Colin Staveley conducted by Meredith Davies.

Contributors

Singer: Stuart Burrows
Singers: Pendyrus Male Choir
Chorus Master: Glynne Jones
Singer: Delyth Hopkins
Orchestra Leader: Colin Staveley
Conductor: Meredith Davies
Associate Producer: J. Alwyn Jones
Producer: Geraint Stanley Jones

: Vintage Hollywood: Trouble in Paradise

Starring Miriam Hopkins, Kay Francis, Herbert Marshall
with Charlie Ruggles, Edward Everett Horton.

Crime brings together Lily and Gaston, two international crooks, and they fall in love. Their future seems assured when Gaston becomes secretary to a rich widow. But the widow is young and beautiful, and Gaston easily tempted.

Trouble in Paradise has been called the most perfect of Ernst Lubitsch's Hollywood films. A sparklingly witty screenplay with perfectly matched performances from the principals all add up to one of the gayest and most daring of sophisticated comedies made in Hollywood in the 30s.
(This Week's Films: page 9)

Contributors

Director: Ernst Lubitsch
Lily: Miriam Hopkins
Marianne: Kay Francis
Gaston: Herbert Marshall
The Major: Charlie Ruggles
Frangois Edward: Everett Horton
Giron: C. Aubrey Smith
Jacques, the butler: Robert Greig
A Russian: Leonid Kinskey

: Look, Stranger: Mother Thames OBE

'I could have gone to the devil very, very easily .when I was young. I had quite the wrong impulses.'
But at 77, Mrs Dorathea Woodward-Fisher has gladdened many a heart; and to everyone on the river she is known affectionately as 'Mother Thames.'
(...the most lovely things...: p 11)

Contributors

Subject: Mrs Dorathea Wood
Producer: Bridget Winter








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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