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Listings

: Play School: Science Day

Today's story: "All Falling Down" by Gene Zion and Margaret Bloy Graham

Contributors

Presenter: Carole Ward
Presenter: Rod Willmott
Author (All Falling Down): Gene Zion
Author (All Falling Down): Margaret Bloy Graham
Pianist: Paule Reade
Designer: Valerie Warrender
Scriptwriter: Pamela Hill
Series Producer: Cynthia Felgate

: Closedown

: Within These Four Walls: 8

Professor Eric Laithwaite visits the Electrical Engineering Gallery at the Science Museum
With Peter Bennet Stone

Contributors

Interviewee: Professor Eric Laithwaite
Interviewer: Peter Bennet Stone
Director: Peter R. Smith
Producer: Brenda Horsfield

: Newsroom

with Peter Woods
Weather

Contributors

Newsreader: Peter Woods

: Europa: India

The World through European Eyes

On the eve of the Indian General Election Europa presents 'India' - the bitter-sweet nation of Asia as seen by European television networks... the beauty, the Poverty and the problems which face the new government in the 70s.
Introduced by Derek Hart

Contributors

Presenter: Derek Hart
Editor: Ronnie Noble

: Review

Introduced by James Mossman

Georgia Brown sings Brecht
'You say that girls may stnp with your permission,
You draw the line dividing art from sin,
First you must solve the problem of starvation,
Then start your talking, thats where we begin'
Some lyrics from The Threepenny Opera, the best known of the Brecht-Weill musicals.
The songs that Brecht wrote with Kurt Weill in the 20s still retain their power and popularity, and Georgia Brown is their foremost British interpreter. For Review she recreates the world of the Berlin cabaret, its mixture of satire and kitsch out of which these songs were born.

Alan Bennett visits Bernard Berenson
Alan Bennett recalls an informal visit to the famous art historian and collector Bernard Berenson on the eve of the Second World War.

(Colour)

Contributors

Presenter/Editor: James Mossman
Singer (Georgia Brown sings Brecht): Georgia Brown
Presenter (Alan Bennett visits Bernard Berenson): Alan Bennett
Producer: Peter Adam
Producer: Tony Staveacre

: Peter Cook: Where Do I Sit?

In which Peter meets and talks to people who are actually alive today.

(Colour)

Contributors

Presenter/Producer: Peter Cook
Designer: Paul Joel
Producer: Ian MacNaughton

: Jude the Obscure: Part 4: To Shaston

by Thomas Hardy
Dramatised in six parts by Harry Green

Sue has lost her place at the Normal College and Phillotson has suggested they should now marry. She decides to consult Jude, who has met Arabella.

Contributors

Author: Thomas Hardy
Dramatised by: Harry Green

: Late Night Line-Up

including
Bernard Braden as Mark Twain on James Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offences
"There are 19 rules governing literary arts in the domain of romantic fiction... Cooper violates 18 of them... It breaks the record."

Contributors

Editor: Rowan Ayers
Mark Twain: Bernard Braden








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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