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Listings

: New Fashions in Furs

A display with mannequins arranged by H. E. Plaister and G. Kenward-Eggar.

Today viewers will see half-a-dozen mannequins who have been specially chosen for the television camera. They will display furs from London and Paris that will be worn in the spring and winter. The coronation that will take place in May, has had a considerable influence on fur fashions the extent of which will be shown in this programme.
Harold Plaister and G. R. Kenward-Eggar are two authorities on women's fashions. They were once very successful track and road racing motorists who broke records all over Europe and America; their first meeting was at well over a hundred miles an hour on the Byfleet banking at Brooklands.
'Sound' broadcast listeners know them for their "Strange to Relate" series, and viewers for their fortnightly programme of television mannequin parades.

Contributors

Arranged by: H. E. Plaister
Arranged by: G. Kenward-Eggar

: Masks and Mimes

by H. D. C. Pepler.
"Death and the Maiden", to music by Schubert
"Lord Ronald", to traditional music
"My Lady Poltagrue", to music by Frederick Page
"The Briery Bush", to traditional music
"St. George and the Dragon", to music by Frederick Page

Contributors

Writer: H. D. C. Pepler
Presentation: Stephen Thomas

: Geraldo and his Orchestra

(by permission of the Savoy Hotel, Ltd.)

As a youth Geraldo learnt to play the piano while he was touring Europe, and his first job on the stage was as a relief pianist. Until 1930 he directed small orchestras of his own in England and on the Continent. His Gaucho Tango Band appeared at the Savoy Hotel in August 1930, and as a result of his broadcasts and stage appearances he became known as 'The Tango King'. Afterwards he formed a combined straight, dance, and tango orchestra at the Savoy Hotel, where he still plays.

Contributors

Musicians: Geraldo and his Orchestra

: New Fashions in Furs

A display with mannequins arranged by H. E. Plaister and G. Kenward-Eggar.

Contributors

Arranged by: H. E. Plaister
Arranged by: G. Kenward-Eggar

: Masks and Mimes

(Details as at 3.10)

: Cook's Night Out

Marcel Boulestin will demonstrate before the camera the making of the first of five dishes, each of which can be prepared as a separate dish, while the whole together make an excellent five-course dinner. In his first talk, M. Boulestin will demonstrate the cooking of an omelette.

Contributors

Cook/Presenter: Marcel Boulestin

: Cabaret: Eric Wild and his Tea-Timers

with Anne Lenner.

Eric Wild's Tea-Timers are an unusual combination consisting of a xylophone played by Gilbert Webster, bass by Fred Underhay, guitar Eric Robinson, saxophone Ken Bray, trombone Bill Tesky, and cornet by Eric Wild. It specialises in the soft, rhythmic style of playing. All these players are members of the BBC Television Orchestra.
Nearly three years ago, Carroll Gibbons heard this evening's vocalist, petite Anne Lenner, singing in a night club. Soon afterwards she signed a long-term contract to appear with him at the Savoy. She made her television début on January 2, with a band that was assembled and conducted by Val Rosing. Her first stage appearance was at the age of thirteen, when she was one of the Babes in The Babes in the Wood. Before joining Carroll Gibbons she made a big name for herself in cabaret and revue. Her sister, Judy Shirley, took part in "Cabaret Cartoons", which was televised on Monday, January 18.

Contributors

Cornet/bandleader: Eric Wild
Xylophonist: Gilbert Webster
Bass: Fred Underhay
Guitarist: Eric Robinson
Saxophonist: Ken Bray
Trombonist: Bill Tesky
Singer: Anne Lenner








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