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: Ian Rankin Investigates:Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

BBC4's This Is Scotland strand continues with award-winning crime writer
Ian Rankin investigating The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde , tracing the origin of its creation from Robert Louis Stevenson's nightmare in 1885 back to his childhood. Rankin also examines the role of the city that inspired the tale, Edinburgh.

Contributors

Unknown: Ian Rankin
Unknown: Mr Hyde
Unknown: Robert Louis

: Conan Doyle for the Defence

Examination of two reaHife cases the Sherlock Holmes author handled in his other role as a detective. A vicar's son was sentenced to hard labour for killing horses, despite the evidence against him being circumstantial, while a German Jew was set to hang for the murder of an elderly spinster - which Doyle exposed as a high-profile cover-up. Part of the This Is Scotland strand. See panel.

Contributors

Unknown: Sherlock Holmes

: Murder Rooms: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes

Murder mystery following the fictional exploits of the young Arthur Doyle and his mentor Dr Joseph Bell, who provided the inspiration for Sherlock Holmes, following the duo as they hunt for a serial killer. See panel.

Contributors

Joseph Bell: Ian Richardson
Sir Henry Carlyle: Charles Dance
Arthur Conan Doyle: Robin Laing
Elspeth: Dolly Wells
Lady Sarah Carlyle: Ruth Platt

: Ian Rankin's Hidden Edinburgh

The author revisits locations used in his John Rebus novels, revealing the darker side of Edinburgh - including a police station where Rankin was interviewed about a real murder.

: New Town

: Ian Rankin Investigates

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

To read scans of the Radio Times magazines from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s, you can navigate by issue.

Welcome to BBC Genome

Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

BBC Guidance

This historical record contains material which some might find offensive
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