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Listings

: The Countrywoman's Day: II

Dr. Stella Chrchill, 'How to Deal with Minor Ailments'

: A Ballad Concert

HILDA BLAKE (Soprano)
ROBERT BERESFORD (Baritone)

: Organ Music

Played by EDWARD O'HENRY
Relayed from TUSSAUD'S CINEMA

: LIGHT MUSIC

LEONARDO KEMP and his PICCADILLY
HOTEL ORCHESTRA
From THE PICCADILLY HOTEL

: A Ballad Concert

ESTHER COLEMAN (Contralto)
WILLIAM HESELTINE (Tenor)
JOYCE ANSELL (Pianoforte)

: Light Music

Fred Kitchen and The Brixton Astoria Orchestra
With Pattman at the Organ
Relayed from The Brixton Astoria

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

' Allegro ' (Handel) and other Violin
Solos, played by DAVID WISE
'The Woodpigeons '—another Mortimer Batten story
'The Happy Zoo '—a Zoo Talk by LESLIE G. MAINLAND

: Readings from the Victorian Poets

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

: ' The First News '

; WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS
BULLETIN

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BRAHMS' VIOLIN SONATAS
Played by MARJORIE HAYWARD (Violin) and O'CONNOR MORRIS (Pianoforte)

: ' Looking Backwards'—I—Sir ALFRED YARROW

THE world moves so rapidly these days that yester day is almost ' history ' before to-day is born.
With the increasing tempo of life it becomes more and more difficult to keep our perspective with regard to the generations immediately passed.
It comes with a shock for us to hear our grand-fathers, in reminiscent mood, tell of days to which, for instance, all the thousand and one amenities derived from electricity were unknown. Yet few things are more delightful than hearing of such days from the lips of those who were vividly alive in them : a sense of the continuity of life comes to us and a realisation that to-day, for all its immediate and pressing attractiveness, is only a single link in a chain stretching back. wards as well as forwards.
Sir Alfred Yarrow , who is opening this series of talks in which we are going to look back through the eyes of men and women who were very much alive in days quite different from our own, is himself eighty-eight years of age. His work as a ship - builder has made his name' famous all over the world, his merchant steamers, river steamers, and other kinds of craft being found in every sea.

: Edward German Programme

MAVIS BENNETT (Soprano)
STUART ROBERTSON (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
ORCHESTRA
Overture, The Rival Poets'
STUART ROBERTSON and Chorus
The Yeomen of England (' Merrie England ')
THE setting of Merrie England is indeed merry, a land and an age when the sun shone and summer was truly summer. And the music is no less eloquent than the tale of the fresh, open air and smiling countryside. When it appeared in 1902, it was hailed with joy as a worthy successor to the long line of Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas ; it is in every way worthy to take its place beside them.
MAVIS BENNETT
She had a Letter from her Love ('Merrie
England')
STUART ROBERTSON and Chorus
King Neptune (' Merrie England') MAVIS BENNETT
Who shall say that Love is cruel ? (' Merrie
England')
ORCHESTRA
Valse Gracieuse
CHORUS
Part Song:
My Bonnie Lass she smileth
Quartet:
Four Jolly Sailormen (' A Princess of Kensington')
MAVIS BENNETT
Twin Butterflies (' A Princess of Kensington ')
STUART ROBERTSON and CHORUS
The Song of the Devonshire Men (' The Emerald Islo ')
AFTER the success of The Rose of Persia, produced at the Savoy at tho end of 1899, Sullivan and Hood, his librettist for that work, embarked together on The Emerald Isle. Sullivan, however, died before his share of the task was much more than sketched out, and the music was completed by Sir Edward German ; the opera was produced in April, 1901.
Save for the expert, it is difficult to say which of the music is Sullivan's and which is German's. It is all full of that delightfully happy melody which made the Gilbert and Sullivan, and afterwards the German operas, the best things of their kind which the world possesses, and the music fits the text so closely as to form that completely satisfying unity which even grand opera only rarely achieves.
ORCHESTRA
Three Dances (' Henry VIII ')
MAVIS BENNETT and Chorus
Hey derry down (' Tom Jones ')
CHORUS
Here's a Paradox for Lovers ('
Tom Jones ')
Finale, Act I (' Tom Jones ')

: 'The Second News'

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN ; Local News (Daventry only) ; Shipping Forecast and Fat Stock Prices

: Professor WINIFRED CULLIS :

' The New Programme of Talks'

: Vaudeville

WILL HAY (The Schoolmaster Comedian)
TOMMY HANDLEY (Comedian) Mr. FLOTSAM and Mr. JETSAM MABEL CONSTANDUROS and MICHAEL HOGAN in 'THE WHALE' by Mabel Constanduros and Michael Hogan
JACK PAYNE and his B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA and a relay from the COLISEUM

: DANCE MUSIC

JACK HYLTON 'S AMBASSADOR CLUB BAND
Directed by RAY STARITA , from the AMBASSADOR
CLUB.

: JACK HARRIS' GROSVENOR HOUSE BAND

From GROSVENOR HOUSE, PARK LANE








About this project

This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

There are more than 5 million programme listings in Genome. This is a historical record of the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today.

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Genome is a digitised version of the Radio Times from 1923 to 2009 and is made available for internal research purposes only. You will need to obtain the relevant third party permissions for any use, including use in programmes, online etc.

This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

Your use of this version of Genome is covered by the BBC Acceptable Use of Information Systems Policy and these terms.

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