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: (Daventry only) WEATHER FORECAST

(For 3.0-4.30 Programmes see page 19.)

: CHURCH CANTATA No. 58 (BACH)

ACH GOTT, WIE MANCHES HERZE-
LEID'
(0 God, how oft with heart oppress'd) (Relayed from the Guildhall School of Music)
Singers
KATE WINTER (Soprano)
WILLIAM BARRAND (Bass)
S. KNEALE KELLEY (Solo Violin)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Oboes, Cor Anglais and Strings)
Followed by CHURCH CANTATA No. 50
(BACH)
(for double chorus)
'NUN 1ST DAS HEIL UND DIE KRAFT' (' Now hath Salvation and Strength ')
THE WIRELESS CHORUS
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
(Trumpets, Tympani, 3 Oboes, Bassoons, Strings)
LESLIE WOODGATE (Organ)
Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON (For the words of these Cantatas see page 40)

: BIBLE READING

PAUL'S LETTERS-IV
Romans viii, 18-ix, 18

: CHILDREN'S SERVICE

conducted by Canon Guy ROGERS
(for Rae Street Council School)
Relayed from ST. MARTIN'S PARISH
CHURCH, BIRMINGHAM
Order of Service
Assembly, 'Lord, behold us with Thy blessing' (405, Songs of Praise)
Hymn, ' As with gladness, Men of Old' (57, Songs of Praise) Prayers
Lesson (read by a Scholar of the School)
Carols: In the Bleak mid Winter;
Lullay, Lullay
Address
Hymn, ' Brightest and best of the Sons of the morning ' (59, Songs of Praise)
Vesper, ' God that madest Earth and Heaven ' (31, Songs of Praise)
Benediction
(For 4.30 fo 6.15 Programmes see page 17)

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

RISPAH GOODACRE (Contralto)
ANDREW CLAYTON (Tenor)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL

: A Religious Service

From the Studio
Conducted by Mr. H. MARTYN Gooch, General Secretary of the World's Evangelical Alliance (British Organization)
THE UNIVERSAL WEEK OF PRAYER
(WORLD'S EVANGELICAL ALLIANCE)
Hymn, ' 'The Church's one Foundation ' (A. and M No. 215, w. I, 2, 5)
The Hallowing Introduction The Thanksgiving
A Prayer from Scripture
Psalm 96, Cantate Domino Lesson, St. John xvii, 1-26
Hymn, 'Crown Him with many Crowns' (A. and M. No. 304)
Address by Dr. W. Y. FULLERTON
Hymn, The Saviour of the World ' (The words of this hymn are on page 18)
The Blessing
(For 8.45-10.30 Programmes see page 17.)

: The Week's Good Cause

An Appeal on behalf of THE BRITISH HOME FOR
'DEAF AND DUMB WOMEN by the Chairman,
Lady COOPER, O.B.E.
THE British Home for Deaf and Dumb women is both a training home for deaf women and girls and a permanent home for deaf women who, by reason of age or some physical defect, such as partial blindness, are unable to support themselves. It receives applicants of sixteen years of age and upwards.
Those who are sent for training usually remain three years, during which time they arc trained in housework, laundry-work and dress-making. They also attend classes to extend, or maintain, their education as, owing to various causes, they have often been unable to profit by the present day facilities for the education of the deaf and dumb.
Donations should be addressed to the Secretary, The British Home for [address removed]

: 'The News'

WEATHER FORECAST, GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN;
Local News; (Daventry only) Shipping Forecast

: A Concert

Relayed from THE PAVILION, BOURNEMOUTH
S.B. from Bournemouth
BERNARD Ross (Baritone)
THE BOURNEMOUTH MUNICIPAL ORCHESTRA
Conducted by Sir DAN GODFREY
.(Solo Violins, BERTRAM LEWIS and BYRON BROOKE )
BERLIOZ had a very poor opinion of his fellow countryman Herold, the composer of Zampa. He accused him of having no style of his own, combining in his music something borrowed from France, Germany, and Italy, to produce what Berlioz called 'merely Parisian music.' And of this opera he said, 'the banging of the big drum at the end is so continuous and furious that one is tempted to take to one's heels.' The world at large does not share that uncomplimentary verdict, and the Overture, with its vigour and energy, has always been popular, lending itself to performance in many different forms.
THIS work of Mendelssohn's, more than any other-presents him to us as a veritable ' Peter Pan ' of music, who definitely refused to grow up. It had its birth in the garden of the house in Berlin to which the family had just moved in Mendelssohn's seventeenth year, the same garden in which so much fine music was afterwards finely played. And though the work of a mere boy. it is in every way which matters masterly music. But it is its grace and charm, its clear freshness of open spaces, with something of the wann glamour of summer nights, the mischief of Puck, and the boisterous mirth of the Clowns' Dance, which the listener recognizes, rather than the skill with which the work is built.
LEONCAVALLO'S one-act Opera is a play within a play, and there is an audience on the stage besides the one 'in front.' Instead of the customary Overture, there is a prologue sung by the Clown of the Strolling Players. In his clown's costume, with white cap and painted face, he thrusts the curtains apart and comes before the footlights to explain to the audience that, for once in a way, the story they are about to follow on the stage is no invented one, but a real tragedy which the composer himself once witnessed. The Clown tells his hearers not to think of the players as merely puppets. 'Ours are human hearts beating with passion; we are but men like you,' he sings, closing his exhortation with the words, 'Ring up the curtain.' It is so effective a piece of vocal music that its universal popularity with baritone singers is easy to understand.

March, ' The Crown of Chivalry' - Fletcher
Overture, 'Zampa' - Hérold
Serenata - Toselli
Selection, ' A Midsummer Night's Dream ' - Mendelssohn
BERNARD Ross Aria, Prologue, ' I Pagliacci ' - Leoncavallo
ORCHESTRA Gavotte, 'Mignon ' - Ambroise Thomas
Praeludium - Järnefelt
Fantasie Duologue for Organ and Orchestra - Boellmann (At the Organ, PHILIP DORE)
Tone Poem, ' Finlandia' - Sibelius

: Epilogue

'LORD, WHAT IS MAN ?'
'FEAR'








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