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Listings

: A Concert

FRANCES ALLSOM (Soprano)
WILLIAM BIGGS (Tenor)
WILFRID PARRY (Pianoforte)

: ORGAN MUSIC

Played by REGINALD FOORT
Relayed from the Regent
Cinema, Bournemouth
S.B.from Bournemouth

: FOR THE SCHOOLS

Mr. A. LLOYD JAMES—' Speech and Language '

: EVENSONG

FROM WESTMINSTER ABBEY

: Mr. J. W. ROBERTSON SCOTT

: ' Our Great Grand-fathers' Countryside V, How the Preachers and Teachers Lived'

: A Concert

ANNIE PIMBLOTT (Contralto) PERCY GARSIDE (Baritone)
The GERSHOM PARKINGTON
QUINTET

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR

.' Christopher Robin and Winniethe-Pooh, Piglet and Eeyore, and Kanga and Roo '
More Songs from ' When Wo Were Very Young' (A. A. Milne), set to music by H. Fraser -
Simsori and sung by DALE SMITH
' Piglet does a Very Grand Thir
House at Pooh Corner ' (A.
' Sneezles,' The Emperor's Rhyi given,' from ' Now We are Six '

: ' The First News'

; WEATHER FORECAST, FIRST GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

MUSIC for WIND INSTRUMENTS

: Mr. A. V. JUDGES

: 'Life and Labour in England from Elizabeth to Anne-VI, Prices, Money and Credit'
CONCLUDING his miniature history of Life and Labour in Early England, Mr. Judges lays before us the developments that led up to the ultimate foundation of the Bank of England. The discoveries of the Renaissance, especially in South
America, had opened up new mines of precious metals. In the exploitation of these, Europe grew used to having more money and its trade developed ; but with the development of trade, prices rose. Then began those banking experiments whose successes and failures are among the most interesting pages of monetary history. From this general aspect Mr. Judges will narrow down the view to England's share in all this. leading up to the final establishment of the Bank of England itself.

: A Brass Band Concert

S.B. from Manchester
THE BESSES 0' TH' BARN BAND
Conducted by FRED. ROYLE
IN spite of his foreign-sounding name, Alfred Cellier was a real Londoner, who spent most of his life there. As a small boy he was a chorister at the Chapel Royal, St. James', and at the age of eighteen already became organist of All Saints', Blackheath. But for many years he was chiefly occupied with the theatre, conducting and composing, and in 1886, at the age of forty-two, scored the greatest success of his career with Dorothy. It ran continuously in one theatre for the whole autumn until near the end of December; transferred then to another, it had again an exceptionally long run. It is still quite often sung by amateur operatic societies, and parts of it are frequently heard in concerts; its popularity is fully merited by its own real charm and melodiousness.

: ' The Second News '

WEATHER FORECAST, SECOND GENERAL NEWS BULLETIN; Local News (Daventry only) Shipping
Forecast

: Speeches

Following the Annual Banquet organized by The United Associations of Great Britain and France
Relayed from the Hyde Park
Hotel

: A Butterworth Programme

SINCLAIR LOGAN (Baritone)
THE WIRELESS ORCHESTRA
Conducted by STANFORD
ROBINSON
Rhapsody, ' A Shropshire Lad '
ALTHOUGH Butterworth was only thirty when he was killed in action in 1916, be had already made his own mark on English music. Strongly national in idiom, his music owes something to his enthusiasm for Folk-song and dance, but a happy fertility of invention was his, too.
This Rhapsody was intended first as an epilogue to his own Song Cycles on A. E. Housman's poems ; it was played for the first time under the late Arthur Nikisch at the Leeds Festival in 1913. It begins with a soft theme which is heard first on muted violas and then on clarinets, and along with part of the main theme of the section which follows, this provides the material for an introduction: The principal tune of the main section which succeeds is abroad flowing melody in two phases, to the second of which reference has been made above. It is given out with sonorous strength and full accompaniment. It includes, as most listeners will remember, a quotation from one of the songs—' Loveliest of trees, the cherry ... wearing white for Eastertide.' There is a further theme of tranquil character given to the strings, and it, with the first subject, is freely used in a development of varied interest and resource. Harp and wood-winds, in particular, are employed with fine effect, and there is a beautiful passage for solo violin. At the close, the music returns to the meditative spirit of the opening; the work is rounded off by a sad little melody for the flute.

: SINCLAIR LOGAN and Small Orchestra

Song Cycle, Love blows where the wind blows '
In the year that's come and gone Life in her creaking shoes
Fill a glass with golden wine On the way to Kew
10.30 ORCHESTRA
Idyll for Small Orchestra, ' The Banks of Green
Willow'

: DANCE MUSIC

JACK PAYNE and his B.B.C. DANCE
ORCHESTRA
RONALD GOURLEY (Entertainer)








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