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Listings

: THE CARLTON HOTEL OCTET

Directed by RENE TAPPONNIER
From the Carlton Hotel

: The Rugby League Challenge Cup Final

Wigan v. Dewsbury
Community Singing
Conducted by A. C. CAIGER and THE BAND OF H.M. WELSH GUARDS
(Bv kind permission of Colonel R. E. K. LEATHAM ,
D.S.O.)
(Under the auspices of the Daily Express)

: A Running Commentary on the Match

Relayed from Wembley Stadium

: A Concert

MILDRED WATSON (Soprano)
THE J. H. SQUIRE CELESTE OCTET

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR :

' 'ERBERT TAKES his FAMILY TO THE TOWER' by C. E. HODGES

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BACH—KLAVIERBÜCHLEIN AND NOTENBUCH
Played by GORDON BRYAN (Pianoforte)

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

RUSSELL OWEN (Tenor)
EFFIE KALISZ (Pianoforte)
THE WIRELESS Military BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
MICHAEL WILLIAM BALFE, though counted as one of our English composers, was really Irish, born in Dublin in 1808. At the early age of six he was playing the violin for his father's dancing classes, and a year later was able to score the dance music for a band. In 1817 he appeared as solo violinst and in the same year made his debut as a composer with a ballad which was afterwards sung by Madame Vestris. After several years of varied experience, which included playing in the orchestra at Drury Lane, travelling abroad and meeting Cherubim, Rossini, and other masters, singing too as an operatic baritone with decided success, he began his career as a writer of English Opera in 1835. For some time he combined his activities in that direction with singing, and among the parts in which he made successful appearances was that of Pagagono, in the first performance of The Magic Flute in English, in March, 1838.
In 1841 he removed to Paris, where several of his works were produced with real success. It was during his stay there that he composed The Bohemian Girl, the most successful of all his operas, and the only one which maintains its hold on public affection today. He came back to England and produced it at Drury Lane Theatre in November, 1843. Fifteen years later it was given in Italian at Her Majesty's with the name La Zingara , and in 1869 the Theatre Lyrique,
Paris, staged it in an enlarged form with several additional numbers by Balfe himself, calling it La Bohemienne.
THIS was the first Ballet which the Imperial
Opera of Moscow commissioned from
Tchaikovsky. He had just finished his Third Symphony, and composed this music in the quiet country house of a married sister, working so happily that the first two acts were finished in a fortnight.
The first performance was not a great success, inadequate performance being more to blame than the music itself. Its tuneful grace and charm soon won their way to popularity, and in the form of a Suite the music has ever since held a place of its own in the affections of Tchaikovsky's admirers.
In the Ballet, the Swan is a beautiful maiden who has been enchanted by a wicked magician and who is in the end rescued by her faithful Knight. There are six movements in the Suite, called respectively :-
(1) Scene; (2) Waltz; (3) Dance of the Swans; (4) Scene; (5) Hungarian Dance; (6) Scene

: Mr. GERALD BARRY : ' The Week in London '

THIS talk inaugurates a new series designed to provide an opportunity for the discussion of events of topical interest at home, as distinct from Mr. Bartlett's commentaries on events abroad. As editor of the Saturday Review, Mr. Gerald Barry is in an excellent position to place events before listeners in an intimate and attractive manner. Listeners will remember Mr. Barry's recent debut before the microphone, when, with Sir William Bull , lie debated in a most lively fashion the question of the Channel Tunnel.

: Vaudeville

CLAPHAM and DWYER
(In Another Spot of Bother)
SID PHILLIPS
(The celebrated Saxophonist from the ' Cafe de
Paris ') \
STAINLESS STEPHEN (Comedian)
YVONNE and ALEXIS BROTHERS (In Harmony)
JACK PAYNE and the B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA and A VARIETY ITEM from
THE PALLADIUM








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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