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: (Daventry only) 'Economical "Balanced Ration " Recipes'

THIS concludes the present series of talks on special diets with some economical ' balanced ration ' recipes, dealing particularly with menus which provide a high caloric value at a low cost.

: A SONATA RECITAL

AMINA LUCCHESI (Violin)
MARGERY CUNNINGHAM

: ORGAN RECITAL

by LEONARD H. WARNER
From St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate

Sonata in C Sharp Minor Allegro Appassionata; Andante - Harwood
Passacaglia in C Minor - Bach
Siciliana - Hollins
Entree Pontificale - Boss-i

: LUNCH-TIME MUSIC

MOSCHETTO and Itis ORCHESTRA
From the May Fair Hotel

: Broadcast to Schools;

Dr. B. A. KEEN : 'The Why and Wherefore of Farming (Course III): The Farmer's Year-What happens in the Autumn'

: FRANK WESTFIELD'S ORCHESTRA

From the Prince of Wales Playhouse,
Lewisham

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

Invitations have been sent to ' THE FAMILY' to gather round the microphone at 5.15 p.m.

: Mr. CHARLES W. J. UNWIN: In the Garden—IV, How to Grow Dahlias '

MR. CHARLES W. J. UNWIN concludes his series of four specialized talks on gardening matters with some advice on the growing of Dahlias. The modern cult of the Dahlia has resulted in developments so surprising that it is hard to recognize in some of the shaggy species that ornament our gardens the trim, formal flower that was their 'ancestor.' In response to a considerable demand, raisers have concentrated on producing types which are free-flowering, which carry their blooms well above the foliage on long, stiff stems, and which have special value as interior decoration.

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

SONGS OF SCHUMANN
Sung by JOHN THORNE (Baritone)
Op. 83. No. 3, Der Einsiedler (The Hermit)
Op. 139, No. 7, Ballade
Op. 89, No. 4, Abschied vom Walde (Farewell to the Wood)
Op. 95. No. 2, An den Mond (To the Moon)
Op. 96, No. 4, Gesungen (Sung)
Op. 89, No. 5, Ins Freio (Into the Open)

: Professor F. A. E. CREW: 'Why do we Die?' S.B. from Edinburgh

THE inevitable coming of the ' great leveller ' is taken for granted ; yet why, apart from disease. accident, and suchlike unnatural events, do we die ? Professor Crew, who will deal with the problem from a biological point of xiew, is
Director of the Animal Breeding Research Depart ment in the University of Edinburgh and Pro fessor of Animal Genetics. He is, apart from his aeademie work. widely known for his biological monographs and manuals.

: A MILITARY BAND CONCERT

HELEN HENSCHEL (Soprano)
Livio MANNUCCI (Violoncello)
THE WIRELESS MILITARY BAND
Conducted by B. WALTON O'DONNELL
DOIELDIEU was so modest about his own work that. if the story- be true. lie used to take the completed sections of his early Opera, The Caliph of Bagdad, to the Conservatoire in Paris where he was a professor, to ask his pupils for their verdict on the music. If they did not like it, he referred it to the great Mehul. Ho need have been in no doubt about the attractive qualities of his work ; nearly all his light-hearted and melodious operas won immediate success, and many of them held the stage for generations after his own day.

: 'St. Joan'

by GEORGE BERNARD SHAW
The Second Part
Commencing with Scene Four, a Tent in the English Camp








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

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