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Listings

: A CONCERT

in the Studio
HELEN GOUGH (Violin)
MURIEL MICHELL (Contralto) LEONARD ISAACS (Pianoforte)

: Midday Concert

THE CITY OF BIRMINGHAM
ORCHESTRA
Conducted by ADRIAN BOULT
Relayed from the Town Hall, Birmingham

2.0 2.25 (Daventry only)
Experimental Transmission of Still Pictures by the Fultograph Process

: Evensong

From Westminster Abbey

: A Concert

SIDONIE WASSERMAN (Pianoforte)
THE CARLTON MASON SEXTET

: THE CHILDREN'S HOUR:

' In THE SHADOW OF THE GUILLO
TINE'
A Play of the French Revolution specially written for broadcasting by C. E. HODGES

: Lenten Eldoress

The Rev. ERIC SOUTHAM:'Teach us to pray—III. When ye pray say, ''Thy Kingdom come. Thy Will be done on earth as it is in Heaven."'
S.B. from Bournemouth

: THE FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC

BEETHOVEN-VARIATIONS FOB PIANOFORTE
Played by V. HELY-HUTCHINSON

: Professor H. G. DALWAY TURNBULL:' India —VI, Today and Tomorrow '

IN his final talk Mr. Tumbull discusses the results of British rule in India, with such admitted advantages as peace, security, material progress, and increase of population. He explains what is meant by tho experiment of Dyarchy and the ideal of Swaraj, whose prophet is Gandhi. He discusses the question whether parliamentary government is suitable or possible for India, with its semi-independent native states and its special martial races, and he concludes with a brief survey of tho probl3ms facing the Simon Commission.

: Vaudeville

MURIEL GEORGE and ERNEST BUTCHER
(In Folk-Songs and Duets)
JULIAN ROSE (Our Hebrew Friend)
GWEN FARRAR and BILLY MAYERL (in Comedy
Numbers)
CHARLES HIGGINS (the New Comedian)
SARAH SARONY
(Songs at the Piano)
JACK PAYNE and The B.B.C. DANCE ORCHESTRA

: National Lecture 1-' Poetry'

by THE POET LAUREATE
ROBERT BRIDGES, D.LITT.
Relayed from Magdalen College, Oxford

: The Wireless Singers

Conducted by STANFORD ROBINSON
A GLEE is not necessarily the merry piece which its namo might suggest; there can be mournful Glees as well as cheerful ones. The name has an Anglo-Saxon origin which means simply music, and any piece in at least three parts for voices without accompaniment can be called a Glee. It differs chiefly from the Madrigal in this way, that it is usually built up of short phrases which are so far complete in themselves that each finishes with a Cadence before the next begins. In a Madrigal the effect is more continujus, one part beginning a new phrase before another reaches its close, the phrases overlapping. (First Performance)
THE word Ballet is now almost exclusively associated with dancing, but is really the same in origin as Ballad, and the original Ballet was, to all intents and pur. poses, a form of Madrigal. It is thought that the early dances were accompanied by singing as well as playing, and that the association of the term with dancing arises in that way.
MADRIGAL, Palaemon and his
Sylvia Francis Pilkington (1624)
T ITERALLY, a Madrigal means no more than any secular piece for two or more voices, and in its simplest form is one of the oldest kinds of music as we know it now. In the Middle Ages the music was very closely knit with the poetry, and the literature of Madrigals ia a subject which has involved many learned discussions. The composition and the singing of Madrigals flourished in England as early as the thirteenth century, reaching its flower in the Elizabethan age. The Madrigals of Byrd Morley , Wcelkes, Wilbye, Gibbons and many others are still often heard, although the happy custom of singing Madrigals when friends mot together has almost banished from modern usages. But the way in which the Madrigal made itself a real part of our national life is ono small piece of musical history of which England may be justly proud.
A CANZONET was originally a small Canzona. another form of Madrigal. At the end of the sixteenth and in the seventeenth centuries the name was chiefly used for short aongs set for four voices, and in 1597 Morley published a collection of Canzonets to which that description applies. The word was later used for many different forms of song.
THIS old piece, dating right back to the i- thirteenth century, is one of the most interesting specimens of the music of the Middle Ages. It is the oldest known Canon-that is, a piece in which the voices imitate each other, singing the same phrases one after another, and in many other ways it is the starting point of our present-day music.








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This site contains the BBC listings information which the BBC printed in Radio Times between 1923 and 2009. You can search the site for BBC programmes, people, dates and Radio Times editions.

We hope it helps you find information about that long forgotten BBC programme, research a particular person or browse your own involvement with the BBC.

Through the listings, you will also be able to use the Genome search function to find thousands of radio and TV programmes that are already available to view or listen to on the BBC website.

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This internal version of Genome, which includes all the magazine covers, images and articles as well as the programme listings from the Radio Times, is different to the version of BBC Genome that is available externally/to the public. It is only available inside the BBC network.

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